ppddry

HMS Pandora 1779 in 3D

104 posts in this topic
On 2013-03-23 at 1:02 PM, Garward said:

Hi, Jingyang! 

 

This HMS "Pandora" in scale 1:48
model russian master Narim Majgeldinov is constructed.
Your 3D model looks perfectly!

Hi Garward! It is a gorgeous model! If I recall correctly this is one of the models that inspired me into undertaking this project :D

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When you're done with the model building, you should look at Substance Painter 2 for the texturing, a model that good deserves a good texturing job and CAD programs simply aren't designed to do that. I've used Substance Painter quite a bit and nothing out there can compete with how easy it is to generate outstanding results.

 

There's a pretty significant learning curve coming from a CAD world as to how high end rendering works today, with low and high poly models with normal maps and ambient occlusion maps and ID maps and curvature maps and how physics-based rendering (PBR) works with the now-standard metal/roughness shaders. And with a model that complex you'd definitely want an automated tool for generating the UVW maps for all the textures like Unwrella or Flatiron (that's the one I use). But the results are well worth it.

 

 

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On 2013-06-14 at 4:29 AM, harvey1847 said:

Absolutly Amazing!

 

Some pictures look like an authentic witchcraft job...

 

Do not understand how you change from 2D to 3D. Can you explain us this a little bit. On other thing, Are you able from the model in 3D to get a full set of plans to make her for real? The question might be pretty obvious but I only work in 2D and I´m not familiar with the 3D stuff.

 

Best wishes Shipwrigt!

 

 

Daniel.

Hi Daniel,

 

Sorry for the VERY late reply ;). The process is as follows: firstly the 2D drawings of the frames are imported on to different reference plans in Solidworks, then draw the boundary of the hull surface with the help of other imported 2D drawing curves, finally use the boundary surface feature in Solidworks to construct the hull surface guided by the curves. As can be seem from the pictures below. And Yes, a set of 2D drawings can be generated from the 3D model.

 

Best regards,

Jingyang

hull3.png

hull2.png

hull1.png

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On 2013-08-05 at 9:42 PM, Experiment said:

Brilliant work,

I have been playing around with the idea of doing a similar project with the same plans. I am hoping to construct a 3D model while also actually building the model for real.

I was wondering which drawing from the book you refered to in order to obtain the inner surface for the frames?  Is this done from the cross sections in the book of the different frames? Or is their an easier way?

 

Thank you so much for the help, and the inspirational work.

best regards,

Experiment

Hi Experiment,

 

Yes, it is done from the cross sections in the book, corrected with the scantlings of the frames listed in The Shipbuilder's Repository. I just sent an reply to your PM.

 

Best regards,

 

Jingyang

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On 2013-08-15 at 2:47 PM, timtom1 said:

totally amazing!

 

Please can we have renders of frames 25,23,21 and 19 on the deadwood so we can see the taper of the deadwood?

 

Thanks

 

Tim

Hi Tim, will the following pictures be of any help?

aft DW 4.png

aft DW 3.png

aft DW 2.png

aft DW 1.png

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On 2017-02-24 at 0:44 PM, Mark P said:

Hi ppddry;

 

Absolutely wonderful draughting work.  The level of detail incorporated is something that would reward many hours of studying your drawings,  and there would still be more to find.

 

One very small point,  given by someone who knows he can never equal what you have done here,  but I hope you would like to know it,  is that the knee of the head tapered forwards,  and was much narrower below the figurehead than where it was bolted to the stem,  which you show correctly.  However,  the standard in the head,  at the top of the knee,  was narrower,  and almost parallel sided,  and did not follow the taper of the timbers below it,  leaving a ledge where the standard sat on the knee.  The leading edge in the upper part of the knee was also rounded over,  quite noticeably at the top,  diminishing to nothing as it went down.

 

If this has been left as a chamfer deliberately,  apologies for raising it before you have finished.

 

All the best,

 

Mark P

 

 

Hi Mark,

 

Thank you very much to pointing out the inaccuracy! The following picture shows the standard as of now. It seems that I need to modify it further. Also, do you mean the two light blue edges should be rounded near the stem post but remain sharp near their front end?

 

Best regards,

Jingyang

head standard.png

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Hi Jingyang;

 

Thank you for your reply.  The level of your draughting skill continues to amaze me.  I am competent with 2D CAD,  but I could never achieve what you make look so straightforward.

 

To answer your queries: 

 

The taper of the standard as compared to the knee of the head below it is now shown correctly above.  However,  the shape of the standard needs to be revised.  It actually curves upward at its forward end,  and is scarphed into a thin,  curving extension piece,  which extends up behind the figurehead.  The upper edges of both the standard and the extension are given a small chamfer.

 

The rounding over I was referring to is to the timber right at the front of the knee of the head,  below the figurehead.  This should be virtually semi-circular.  The cambered cladding piece which you show attached to the forward edge would not have been made so.  Such thin wear pieces are attached lower down,  where the leading edge is a hollow curve. 

 

One last point is that the gammoning slot is cut in the head of the gammoning piece,  which extends well down,  and is the principal timber of the knee of the head.  There would not be a horizontal joint below the gammoning slot,  curving up as it goes forward.  If you can,  take a look at one of the excellent practicums by Ed Tosti or David Antscherl;  or study a build log here looking for a part of the framing plan showing the knee of the head.  They know far more about this than I do,  and have illustrated it very well. 

 

Again,  if you are already aware of this,  and it is just because I am looking at a work still in progress,  please accept my apologies.

 

All the best, 

 

Mark P

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9 hours ago, Mark P said:

Hi Jingyang;

 

Thank you for your reply.  The level of your draughting skill continues to amaze me.  I am competent with 2D CAD,  but I could never achieve what you make look so straightforward.

 

To answer your queries: 

 

The taper of the standard as compared to the knee of the head below it is now shown correctly above.  However,  the shape of the standard needs to be revised.  It actually curves upward at its forward end,  and is scarphed into a thin,  curving extension piece,  which extends up behind the figurehead.  The upper edges of both the standard and the extension are given a small chamfer.

 

The rounding over I was referring to is to the timber right at the front of the knee of the head,  below the figurehead.  This should be virtually semi-circular.  The cambered cladding piece which you show attached to the forward edge would not have been made so.  Such thin wear pieces are attached lower down,  where the leading edge is a hollow curve. 

 

One last point is that the gammoning slot is cut in the head of the gammoning piece,  which extends well down,  and is the principal timber of the knee of the head.  There would not be a horizontal joint below the gammoning slot,  curving up as it goes forward.  If you can,  take a look at one of the excellent practicums by Ed Tosti or David Antscherl;  or study a build log here looking for a part of the framing plan showing the knee of the head.  They know far more about this than I do,  and have illustrated it very well. 

 

Again,  if you are already aware of this,  and it is just because I am looking at a work still in progress,  please accept my apologies.

 

All the best, 

 

Mark P

Hi Mark,

 

Thank you very much for your explanation! I deliberated on this very issue during the build.

 

I read Ed Tosti and David Antscherl's books and was aware of that they shew different configurations for the knee of the head. But since they are of different classes of ships and I did not have the contemporary plans showing the construction of the knee of the head of the Porcupine class of ships, I decided to just follow the plans in the Anatomy of the Ship book. I think I will have to do more research into the contemporary sources before I can further revise this part.

 

As for the rounding at the front of the knee of the head, I have been trying to maximize it while keeping the width at the top of the timber marked as 5 in plan B2/2 in the AOS book the same as the width of the front face of the timber marked as 1 in the same plan.

 

Best regards,

Jingyang

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Hi Jingyang;

 

Research in contemporary sources is certainly the best way to find results,  and is wonderfully interesting at the same time. 

 

Your draughting shows that you already have a deep understanding of Pandora's construction,  and if you have read such good authors' works then you have a good breadth of knowledge also,  and I can add little.

 

From what I have seen,  the construction of the knee of the head was largely the same for all vessels,  it just varied in scale and the number of chocks used.

 

All the best,

 

Mark P

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10 hours ago, Mark P said:

From what I have seen,  the construction of the knee of the head was largely the same for all vessels,  it just varied in scale and the number of chocks used.

Hi Mark,

 

That's a good point! I think I will dig deeper on this. Thank you for pointing it out.

There is another inaccuracy you may notice is that the gammoning loops are not arranged correctly. I tried to draw them in the correct way but the results always look awkward. So I drew them as they are now.

 

Best regards,

Jingyang

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Hi Jingyang;

 

The gammoning slot looks fine to me.  I would round off the upper edge a bit,  though,  where the rope will otherwise lie against a sharp corner;  and the same for the hole for the mainstay collar.

 

I wish you all the best progress in your project.  If you ever need a second opinion on any part,  please feel free to ask.  I cannot say that I will know the answer,  of course!

 

One other source of information,  which you may have already tried,  is Navy Board contracts.  When pressures of wartime needed a large number of vessels to be built,  some of them were built at the yards of merchant ship builders.  Normally there would be a contract drawn up,  very detailed,  specifying the scantlings of nearly all the timbers,  and the number and size of bolts,  to ensure that the builder would adhere to Navy standards of construction. 

 

With best wishes,

 

Mark P

 

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Jingyang,

Your work is beautiful. Could you put up some close ups of the main jeers forward of the mast? I'm curious about what that part looks like. Maybe like the image from inside the great cabin like you put up for Gaetan? I'm trying to visualize what that part will look like once complete. Thanks,

Daniel

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