Jump to content
EdT

Modeling the Extreme Clipper Young America 1853

Recommended Posts

Hi Ed,

 

The full name of the book is An Outline of Shipbuilding, Theoretical and Practical by Theodore D. Wilson. If you Google the full title the first entry is the scanned image of the book. My browser does not provide an exact web address but the above should work.

 

The availability of this book is a result of Google's project to scan and post rare books online. It is fortunate for ship modelers that one of the two university libraries picked was the one at the University of Michigan because Michigan has had for the past 130 years a Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering department, hence a good collection of old shipbuilding manuals.

 

If you decide to order this book, I got the hard bound version published by Michigan. Michigan did a nice job of publishing the book BUT it is missing a couple of pages-the last page contains masting rules for warships boats and three Plates presumably showing the lines of a sloop of war. Neither of these omissions would prevent me from buying this book again. There are also paper backed versions but if printed from the same scan would omit the same material.

 

Roger

Canute likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed,

Question about pin (iron pin) locations.  Some of the pin locations in the 5th futtocks of the last few forward square frames actually exceed the outer edge of the opposite face,  (starting about P).  I wouldn't imagine a shipwright would place the 1" iron bars that close to an outer edge.  Should they be more closely centered ?  Also, some of the pin holes are located very close to the end of some futtocks. Many are closer than the thickness of the futtock.  Are those really scale locations?

 

While I'm here, Pattern Ra has all the segments marked Rf.

 

Just about finished with all the square frames.  Can't wait to get to something different.

Bob

Edited by Capt.Bob
mtaylor likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Roger and Bob, thanks for the additional information on the book.  I will pursue it further.  We are indeed indebted to Google for their work in scanning and putting online many historical technical works of interest to model builders.  As I write this I am wading through several on 19th century rigging.  

 

Bob, it is true that on some frames the at both ends of the square framed sections where there is maximum frame bevel.  In fact,you should find that the point where the bolts approach either the inner or outer edges of the frames is the point where the cant frames begin, allowing bolts to be driven "normal" - i.e. at right angles to the face of the frame - while not penetrating the outer or inner edges.  Although bolts in these last square half frames are very close to one edge, due to the bevel, they go through the central section of the piece and usually emerge at the opposite (inner or outer) edge on the mating frame.  

 

If this sounds confusing, it is.  The alternatives are to either start the cant frames much closer to midship or to drive bolts at an angle.  The first would weaken the hull significantly.  The latter choice is less clear.  Some sources indicate that bolts were always - or at least preferred to be - driven normal.  However, I found some pictorial evidence (and posted the picture earlier ) of bolt holes being driven at an angle.  This was taken in the early 20th century and a pneumatic drill was being used.  I kept all the bolts normal because I concluded this was the practice at the time (1850's).  Also, and very important to the model, normal holes were essential in the pin-indexed process I adopted for fabricating frames.

 

Keep in mind that these bolts were mainly used to keep the frames connected for erection.  The real strength that held these together came later when the inboard and outboard planking was secured by either structural bolts and or treenails.  At this point I believe the iron bolts through the frames became superfluous.

 

On the frame patterns the holes were placed very carefully on these beveled sections and I found in building the model that none broke through the edges, but as you say, at the ends of the square framed areas, they get very close.

 

I will add the typo you noted on frame Ra to the list.

 

Ed

Capt.Bob, Canute and mtaylor like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed,

I'm getting ready to reside the futtocks on A thru U and ran into a curiosity.  On frame Ua the siding of the lower futtocks is marked 12" instead of 14" and labeled "Lower Futtock" instead of "1st Futtock".  Also, the 3rd and 5th futtocks are marked 10" and 9" respectively as opposes to 12" and 10".  This makes Ua unique.  Are the siding references accurate?

 

Bob

mtaylor likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Bob,

 

The siding references are correct.  Webb reduced weight at the ends of the hull by increasing frame separation and reducing the size of framing timbers at the ends of the hull.  On the patterns I reduced the sidings from frame U forward and from Frame 19 aft.   The exact locations of these transitions could be argued, but this was the basis I used for the patterns.  The forward reductions could have actually been started a few frames aft, but I eventually settled on U.  You will also note that half and cant frames are similarly reduced in siding.  The changes in frame separation are noted on the shipway plan drawing.

 

Webb was a bit more innovative than most other builders in designing to resist hogging of the hull.  Whereas more typical designs utilized additional wood mass (sister or multi tiered keelsons for example) to provide strength, Webb reduced structural weight at the ends by reducing timber sizes.  It is said that by this method about 25 tons could be removed, thus reducing the stress that caused deflection in these areas of decreased buoyancy caused narrowness of the clipper hulls.  Not that Webb skimped on timber as with the huge keelson and heavy ceiling members - also the iron strapping.  He originated the use of iron strapping on American ships with Challenge in 1851.  I  believe this was discussed in Chapter 1.

 

I take the terms lower futtocks and first futtocks to be synonymous, but consistent usage would have been better. 

 

Ed

Edited by EdT
mtaylor, Mahuna and Capt.Bob like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed,

Thanks for the confirmation.  I've got too much invested to screw things up now.  Also, the background information is always interesting.

Bob

mtaylor likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ed,

Page 61: Figure 3-39  Should be: Figure 5-39

 

Pattern 29a: The 3rd futtock is sided as 10".  Is this accurate?  Everything else is sided as 11"

 

Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Addendum 3 to Volume I

 

This addendum addresses a number of inconsistencies between sidings shown on frame patterns and sidings specified on the List of Dimensions.  As a general rule, the List of Dimensions should be considered the governing source for dimensional data and should be consulted before sizing any pieces.  For convenience, siding dimensions were shown on the patterns.  Placing dimensional data in more than one place is bad practice and usually results in inconsistencies, as it did with a number frame patterns.  These inconsistencies and a few other minor issues have been corrected and revised patterns are attached.  Patterns not included in the attached need no correction.

 

The sidings for cant and half frames given in the List of Dimensions are generalized.  The specific sizes for each of these frames can be taken correctly from the patterns.

 

In virtually all cases, the corrected sidings differ from those on the original patterns by 1 or sometimes 2 inches (.014” to .028” actual).  In most cases the pattern differences resulted from transitions to the reduced sizes at the ends of the hull, being taken at different stations than specified on the List of Dimensions.  Since decisions on where to place these transitions was somewhat arbitrary, since size differences are small, and considering that most of the upper futtocks will be covered by outer planking, some may consider these corrections somewhat academic.  However, this should not be license for inconsistencies in the information.  I for one, consider precision to be important and regret these errors in the original package.  All the addenda will be included on the CD in the next volume.

 

An updated pattern sheet for the bow timbers is also attached.  The original labeled both sides stbd.

 

Ed

1to72 Bow Timbers Patterns.pdf

2f.pdf

17a.pdf

17f.pdf

18a.pdf

19a.pdf

20a.pdf

21a.pdf

22a.pdf

23a.pdf

24a.pdf

25a.pdf

26a.pdf

27a.pdf

27f.pdf

28a.pdf

Aa.pdf

Af.pdf

Ba.pdf

Bf.pdf

Ca.pdf

Da.pdf

Ea.pdf

Ef.pdf

Fa.pdf

Ff.pdf

Ga.pdf

Gf.pdf

Ha.pdf

Hf.pdf

Ja.pdf

Ra.pdf

Rf.pdf

Sa.pdf

Sf.pdf

Ta.pdf

Tf.pdf

Uf.pdf

Capt.Bob, mtaylor, Mahuna and 1 other like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been considering getting this book so I can model the framework in 1/96th scale for a diorama on a model railroad. But I am thinking it might be too long for what I need. Can you tell me the keel to keel length in 1/96"? I am guessing it is about 30".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hull length is 238',  about 230' at the waterline, keel is about 220'.

 

Ed

mtaylor likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ahhhh this ship would look really good inside a commercial light bulb. The book might would be a great addition to my library. So many projects so little time!

Jeff

mtaylor likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Addendum 4 to Volume I

 

Attached are Forecastle Pattern pdfs that correct the carrick bitt patterns and add dimensional information for these.  The purpose of this modification is to clarify windlass axle bore sizes for both 1:72 and 1:96 scales and to help ensure that the windlass drive gears clear both the deck and the underside of the forecastle breast beam.

 

Also attached is pdf for frame Xa, corrected to add toptimber bolt holes.

1to72 Forecastle Patterns.pdf

1to96 Forecastle Patterns.pdf

Xa.pdf

Edited by EdT
Canute, Capt.Bob, mtaylor and 1 other like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mark

 

Ed has some very good drawings on making the simple screw clamps, flexible screw clamps and planking clamps like you see in his build logs in volume I of his Naiad books on pages 215 through 218.  Just one of many great things to be found in his Naiad books.

 

Allan

druxey, mtaylor, Canute and 2 others like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, Mark, for your response to the book and for interest in building the model.  It has been a great experience for me - both the full-framed 1:72 model and the 1:96 hull.  The subject is certainly a beautiful ship.  If you decide to build one version or the other, please consider a build log on MSW.  You will get a lot of help - and a lot of satisfaction from that.  I know I do.

 

As Allan says, The Naid Frigate, Volume I contains an appendix on toolmaking that includes drawings and text on making three types of clamps, the flexible wood screw calmps, a simpler version of these, and the planking clamps that I have used on both Naiad and YA.  I have been pleased to see a number of modelers on MSW adopting these tools and other fixtures described in that first Naiad book.  Also, in that appendix is a section on making and hardening small chisels that will be very helpful in small hardwood joinery.  I will be most interested if you decide to proceed with YA - or make any of the tools.

 

Than you, Allan and Happy New Year to you - and to everyone at MSW as well.

 

Ed

Canute, trippwj, Jack12477 and 4 others like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×