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Julie,  I used both AutoCAD and SolidWorks at work.  I now use AutoCAD only to develop bulkheads and keel for scratch building.  I thought it would be useful to develop a hull in SolidWorks so I could add angled planes to get cant frames and such.  But decided that drawing the 3D ship was more trouble than it was worth for so little return.

 

Bob

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Yambo,

 

Do you have an XP license left? If so, get a second hand PC/Laptop on which you can run XP - maybe add some more memory - install your AutoCAD, and you are good to go ...

If you purchased AutoCAD Lt you can probably go back to mfg. and ask for upgraded 32/64bit install program

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Not really related, but I wanted to be a draftsman out of high school and went to college for 3 years to learn mechanical drafting. After graduation I got a job with a manufacturing company. They just got Autocad, probably version 1. It also came with a Flight Simulator program. At that time, I had never used a computer based drafting program but was very familiar with computers (home computers were just starting to become popular). So I taught the chief draftsman how to use Autocad then stayed late every night so I could try out the flight simulator (I also did a lot of flying with my best friend who is now an airline captain).  Turns out I spent more time on the flight simulator than I did on Autocad.  I haven't drafted in years as my profession changed early in my career.

 

FYI, Flight Simulator was invented by Bruce Artwick who eventually licensed it to Microsoft.  I've owned every version since its inception.

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To run AutoCAD (mine is 2002) on Windows 7, or 8, or 10, you need the Pro version. It will not run on the any of the Home versions. I have run it on my Windows 10 Pro 64, with no problems.

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Just to add more confusion, I recomend the 2016 version of DesignCAD 3D. It runs $70 to $100. There are several sites that offer a $30 discount to the $100 list price.

 

I've used various versions for over a decade, and have been satisfied with it.

 

The 2016 version can input and output files in the SketchUp format. This is a great feature, as only the Pro versions of SketchUp can import AutoCad file formats. Now I can go directly to SketchUp.

 

Don't discount the usefullness of 3D capability. I generaly take my 2D drawings and use the 3D to "build" the model and check that everything lines up. This really comes into it's own when trying to draw from distorted, or partial plans.

 

I have a tutorial on going from 2D to 3D drawings on the forum.  That tutorial is going from 2D DesignCAD to 3D sketchup, should you want to make parts for your models.

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Found an old DVD (2012) with TurboCad Deluxe 2D/3D,

installed it on the laptop using the key license, opened up the program.

Got a question about upgrade clicked yes, now running the Version 19. At no extra cost.

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Ron, when I was working on a 3D AutoCAD build on the electrical installation for a data center, we had 32 bit computers that continually crashed.  I leaned very hard on my boss to get me and my assistant more powerful computers, so the company bought two computers the IT guy said cost $5K each.  The crashes were dramatically reduced but they still happened. 

 

I coordinated with the mechanical contractor at least once a day on that job and told him we had some success reducing crashes.  He and his assistant were experiencing the same thing.  They ended up buying 64 bit machines and crashes became a thing of the past for them.  FWIW, we were both using AutoCAD MEP 2008 but they had to buy the 64 bit version with the new machines.

 

I recently bought a 3D home design program but wasn't happy with how it hung up once I had created most of the interior of our house.  I contacted the company that created the program and they said it was designed to run on a 64 bit machine.  I never upgraded to 64 bit because my AutoCAD program is 32 bit only.      

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On 08/02/2017 at 4:54 PM, Julie Mo said:

Ron, when I was working on a 3D AutoCAD build on the electrical installation for a data center, we had 32 bit computers that continually crashed.  I leaned very hard on my boss to get me and my assistant more powerful computers, so the company bought two computers the IT guy said cost $5K each.  The crashes were dramatically reduced but they still happened. 

 

I coordinated with the mechanical contractor at least once a day on that job and told him we had some success reducing crashes.  He and his assistant were experiencing the same thing.  They ended up buying 64 bit machines and crashes became a thing of the past for them.  FWIW, we were both using AutoCAD MEP 2008 but they had to buy the 64 bit version with the new machines.

 

I recently bought a 3D home design program but wasn't happy with how it hung up once I had created most of the interior of our house.  I contacted the company that created the program and they said it was designed to run on a 64 bit machine.  I never upgraded to 64 bit because my AutoCAD program is 32 bit only.      

You can run a 32bit program on a 64bit machine. It just doesn't use the available resources optimal. You should run a mixed system on a 64bit machine. That way you can use your old, and newer programs. You should take into account that even a lot of so called 64bit programs do not use the possiilities of the machine to the max. Furthermore, if you have a multi core procesor, your memory should be large enough too. Often a mere 8gb is used but that is minimal for a 64bit system. Check what your motherbord and cpu combination can handle.

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I have installed DraftSight after readding this thead. But I cannot launch it. :(

I have tried some solutions but without success. So. I want to ask if anybody has a solution what works. ;)

 

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tabycz

I presume you are running a windows box. Go to Administrative tools|Event viewer

Select Windows Logs|Application

the Column Source is the program. Check if iDraftSight shows up, you can find the problem at Level = Error

 

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FYI, Shapeways, the 3D printing company, shared an email today that lists five popular (and free) 3D drafting programs that you can use to create models suitable for 3D printing.

 

They are:

TinkerCAD

Sketchup (good for creating deck furniture, rigging components, etc. Frames and planking are more difficult)

Sculptris (a free version of Zbrush)

3D Slash (not recommended for ship modeling; too blocky)

Ultimaker's Cura (checks models before 3D printing)

 

And there are always Blender and DELFTship. These are also free, but their learning curves are pretty steep.

 

Terry

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Posted (edited)

Just a helpful tip to get SolidWorks, if you join the EAA (the Experimental Aircraft Association) for their annual membership fee of $20, you can get a free license of SolidWorks student edition.  This is the cheapest way to get a copy other than pirating. 

Edited by rtwpsom2

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Posted (edited)

Maybe it's time to renew my EAA membership. SolidWork is part of the French Dassault Systemes.

EAA annual membership is 40 dollars according to their website.

 

Edited by Nirvana

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