Modeler12

Tips for photographing your models

86 posts in this topic

Jack:

I know the ASA-ISO is the same thing - but back then it was ASA only.  I remember the switch too - many of the older working pros really thought it was as bad as taking metric vs inches.  But it was a case of get with the times.

Yeah, the digital insert is a neat idea.  Even with a single adaptation it would be expensive but with the many cameras it would need to be adapted to work with it would be very costly.  Hasselblad digital backs were very expensive and primitive by today's standards. 

I was just sort of wishing the old F1 stuff could still be used because I have 2 F1's, an A1, an AE1 and 18 Canon lenses from 14mm to 400mm that are completely useless now.  Can't even sell them for anything making it worthwhile to go to the effort.  At least I was able to sell the RB67 for some decent $$.

Kurt

Hi Jack and Kurt,

 

It sounds like we have the same situation except instead of 2 F1s I only have one, but I do also have an Ftb on the other end of the spectrum. I also have a very large number of lenses including a few "L" series and a LOT of accessories like focusing screens, motor drives, etc.. I have been fairly bitter towards Canon, because unlike Nikon, the lenses could not be used on any of the new DSLRs.

 

Jack, if you can provide any more information on this digital cartridge development I would love to hear about it. If it's real, it's some of the best news I've heard in quite a while.

 

Best,

John

 

PS. We met at NRG late on Friday afternoon speaking with EdT. J.

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John, yes, I remember you from NRG Mystic.   The only info I have is the short blurb on one of the network NEWS channels a short while back. I have not had any access to photo magazines in a great while - just stopped buying them - so I have not followed up on it.

 

I bought my current Pentax K50 DSLR mainly because the price was a steal but more importantly it accepts all the K-mounts from their film cameras.  I also have two smaller pocket size Canon digital point-shoot (had one of them in my hand or pocket when we met).

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Chuck you may not like this, but I have to add one more comment about editing.

I just hate it when I see pictures that were taken and shown with the horizon scanted.

This is in Alaska and I probably looked at the ship's post while taking this instead of the horizon.

post-246-0-70906400-1446773874.jpg   post-246-0-41482600-1446773893_thumb.jpg

 

The same thing you see above will happen with a lot of my shots.
If I did not do anything, vertical posts become slanted or water would run out off the water tanks in my cross section.

Any program can correct this.

 

 

 

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Just like the 33 1/3 records, the millennials are getting into film photography too. I sold an old F1 that have issues and a bunch of old manual focus lenses on eBay for decent money - and by decent I mean it was better than having the camera and lenses collecting dust in the house.

 

I did a quick Google search for Digital cartridges for film cameras and got some interesting results.

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Here's an interesting piece of trivia (maybe) - I was watching a documentary on PBS (probably NOVA) some months back on the (United States) National Archives and how they preserve everything.  They said that for all of the digital movies produced today the National Archives re-records them onto film and archives the film as well as the digital copy.  It seems that film has an archival life of 100 years but digital is still unproven. Apparently the digital image(s) degrade on the CD/DVD over time but just how long a time is subject to debate.

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I just bought a new (to me) point and shoot camera that according to various reviews, has excellent macro capability. From the past experience of trying to do various scale model photos, the macro features seemed to be an important factor. At this time, I am still reading through the manual and playing with the camera a bit to get comfortable with it.

I read about the need to use the "A" setting, but I still don't know about setting a depth of field, or what it does to help photos. Will need to refer to my manual for that feature if it has one. I do have the option for the "A" setting.

Last, I am considering a build of a light box to photograph my models. I found this YouTube video on what this guy did to build his own. Mine would need to be larger to accommodate my models, but I wondered if any of you had an opinion or a difference of opinion with the video on making a light box. I don't want to go through the trouble of building one only to find out I either didn't need it or it doesn't do what I wanted it to do, which is to give an uncluttered background for my models, and to give good lighting.

 

 

Thanks for your reply...

Craig

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I was about to do a long input regarding photographing, ....... when the Admiral of mine said "No, don't do it -  You will get way to the photo terms, and nobody will understand you" - this based on my longtime experience in the Photo field.

All I can say from this point, experiment with the "A" setting and you will see the time will change accordingly.

The temperature of light is also important as this can change the color of material,  depending on your light source material can show out differently than what you have on you ship. 

Lighting is another area, don't use a single source direct light as this create shadows. Many lights should be used for an overall picture while a specific point light will highlight what you want to show, again some depth of field can create amazing pictures.

A box shown in video of Craig above is not necessary, but can be helpful especially if you use a small regular digital compact camera.

Sorry, for getting into depth and my Admiral just saw what I wrote...........  I have to stop.

Any questions, please pm me.

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Last, I am considering a build of a light box to photograph my models. I found this YouTube video.

 

Hi Craig,

 

I was going to do a Part 2 of my macro thread on building a light box and got to the point of getting a decent sized box and opaque paper etc but went no further.  There are a lot of good you-tube vids where they build better square boxes to eliminate edges etc so there is a larger surface for a smoother transition hiding the change from horizontal to vertical.

 

I say check a few more videos and go for it.  I would also do a top light also for completely shadow free lighting.  With regards to lighting, 3 flashes remotely triggered would be best but due to expense I was going to go with desk lamps.

 

The white balance can either be customised in the camera, or tweeked in a software program like Light room.  Alternatively get 3 bulbs of the same colour temperature (usually tells you on the box and set the camera to this.  I checked the specs of your camera and apparently also has good auto white balance so 3 bulbs the same colour temperature should work well.  White balance tweeking only really needs to be done if several colour temperatures and source types are competing with each other.  Auto usually works best in most cases.

 

I have never really been fussed with WB as it is one of the easiest things to change in post to get right.

 

Be interested in seeing your light box if you get round to making one as mine has stalled.  I don't think they are for compacts only, primarily they are for good alround well lit subjects without shadows and will lend themselves perfectly for photoing modelling bits and pieces.  A box for a whole model ship might start getting a bit unwieldy though!

 

Cheers

Slog

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Good Morning Slog

 

Yes, there are many YouTube examples of light boxes. Another one that was interesting and simple was made from PVC tubing and fittings, and used fabric as both variable option backgrounds (colors) and white diffusers. In his example, he used some cheap, simple, adjustable, clamp-on lamps from Home Depot with fluorescent bulbs.

Once I settle in on a design for one and build it, will make a post to show what it looks like and let you know if it works well.

 

Craig 

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 In his example, he used some cheap, simple, adjustable, clamp-on lamps from Home Depot with fluorescent bulbs.

 

 

Craig,

 

Lighting is where I have stalled with doing my box.  I have found small cheap lights but the lux is pretty poor so didn't get them.  At the local hardware store found cheap powerful halogen work lights and bought 3.  They are plenty bright enough but the heat they pump out was tremendous and I was worried about them being close to the tissue type paper so didn't progress any further.  In fact 2 are still in their boxes un-assembled.

 

I can't find larger 'normal' lights for the price I am willing to pay.

 

I went to local office supply store and bought several large sheets of heavy weight paper in different colours so I could tape them to the front and back of the box to get a large flat surface to put the subject on and have a large radius bend to make the transition invisible.

 

 

Cheers

Slog

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Slog

 

What about LED lights. Are they sufficient, I wonder? There are some incredibly bright LED lights available these days and they give off very little heat. I have a little LED flashlight that's NiMh powered, and it casts a beam of light like nothing else I've ever seen. Will easily light a target 200 meters away.

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A tip for my fellow modelers about lighting: go to the URL link below.

 

In this site's search box, enter something simple like "LED lighting." There will be 1,717 options for LED lighting for photography - in a very wide price range. LED lights are now standard for most professional photographers; high output, color balanced, small, portable - and increasingly, more affordable.

 

Search under " Macro and ringlights"- this is a category modeler's should seriously consider, especially with today's large sensors that typically have extreme light sensitivity. For modeler's who own a DSLR I'd recommend a ringlight; no muss, no fuss, not too expensive. Nice, even lighting. Not a steep learning curve either.

 

This source/vendor below is mainly for pros but the definition of "pro" is changing as fast as everything else in the world!

 

www.bhphotovideo.com

 

Ron

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Wow - thanks for that link, Ron. Lots of nice products at what seem to be very reasonable prices.

I am so limited by what I don't know about this subject (photography). Makes me wish I had taken it more seriously many years ago, and studied the subject. Teaching an old dog like me, new tricks, is no small task.  :)

 

Craig

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I have to take studio-grade macro photographs everyday of my professional work as a rare book and illuminated manuscript conservator.   I also produce high-quality facsimilies and museum quality exhibit reproductions which require the highest (50 megapixel and up).   I shoot tethered to a computer and for the most part think much of the advice here is pretty good.  

 

HOWEVER.  I shoot almost all my model work with an iphone.   I simply dont have the time, or inclination to stop what Im doing to setup a small studio to take an in-process shot.   I didnt see anyone talking about this...   Anyhow, my point is this:

 

I love to see the final photography of everyones work, with high detail and plain backdrops and great lighting.   However...as a novice and someone learning from you guys...   Please, more shots of the truly in-process stuff.    The "I just planked my hull" shots are great, all polished its amazing how you got to that point....    but dont forget the value of grabbing a quick less than stellar shot of your clamping, your spiling technique, your sanding stick, your bench, your setup ANYTHING.    Many of us are trying to learn everything we can, often in isolation, with only this forum as a guide.     Now I know many of you are not here to teach, as much as you are here to show your work to other equally accomplished builders, however I will encourage and do appreciate those who are interested in teaching and hope they do not forget that much of what you probably consider mundane steps are things that some of us can benefit a great deal from.     

 

That is all...   use your crappy phone, take crappy photos...    Some us dont care and for very good reasons.   Best to all and thanks to all!!

 

:cheers:

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I agree to some of these points; but would like to add some comments.
 

Taking pictures as I go along is a given for me.
How and what you use to do that is a matter of preference.

Since this work is stationary and don't require lots of movements, I will use my Cannon with tripod and some kind of background to do the 'routine'.
Again I might repeat this if a better view is needed.
 

I don't take pictures when I am torching some metal parts or just when I am ready to try something new. It comes later.

However, my camera (mounted or with tripod handy) is always ready.

Sorry, but my 'crappy phone' just is not good enough for me.

 

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Modeler 12

 

Which Cannon camera are you using?

It's an old Rebel with a 28-135mm Image Stabelizing lens. I also have a smaller and lighter lens but I seldom use that.

Keep in mind that I use this camera around the house.

I have a small Panasonic DMC-ZS20 for travel and other uses.

In fact, I used that to make some videos. Some of those were posted here earlier.

 

 

and:

 

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In a prior post I discussed how to use in camera 'live view' to get pinpoint focus.  Here's another option to shoot using 'live view' that's even better.  

 

Using an android device and an app, you can control your DSLR camera and view 'live view' on a large screen.  These apps work similar to DSLR field monitors (which can cost $400) and range in price from free to $10. 

Instead of trying to explain it, here are a couple of videos that demonstrate using a smart phone or tablet to control your DSLR camera. 

 

Use an android tablet as a live monitor for your DSLR camera

Turn your tablet into a preview / field monitor

 

For more information, google:  "Android DSLR controller Canon / Nikon / your camera brand"

 

 

Also, if you're using a tripod and have older Canon lens, be sure to turn the image stabilization off due to 'Shake Return'.  Canon is slowly fixing this. 

More information can be found here:  http://cpn.canon-europe.com/content/education/technical/image_stabilization_lenses.do

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It's an old Rebel with a 28-135mm Image Stabelizing lens. I also have a smaller and lighter lens but I seldom use that.

Keep in mind that I use this camera around the house.

I have a small Panasonic DMC-ZS20 for travel and other uses.

In fact, I used that to make some videos. Some of those were posted here earlier.

 

 

and:

 

 

 

Ahhhh I know this is off topic but just wanted to mentioned that now I know who made these great videos that I found on youtube!!!

 

Thanks for doing that Modeler12 I really enjoy watching them and to be honest I donwloaded them for futures reference.

 

Grtz

 

Ray

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In fact, I used that to make some videos. Some of those were posted here earlier.

 

Hi Jay,

 

I am curious, do you narrate the your actions as you are performing them or film the activity and then narrate afterwards.  I would imagine describing the work as you go could prove quite difficult.

 

 

 

Also, if you're using a tripod be sure to turn the image stabilization off due to 'Shake Return'.

 

This is an interesting point.  When I am using the tripod I often forget to turn off the VR (Nikon's Vibration Reduction) and it doesn't seem to matter with my Nikon lenses, but with the Tamron lense the captured image is quite blurry and takes a few head scratching moments before I realise I haven't turned the VC (Tamrons Vibration Control) off. LOL 

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This is an interesting point.  When I am using the tripod I often forget to turn off the VR (Nikon's Vibration Reduction) and it doesn't seem to matter with my Nikon lenses, but with the Tamron lense the captured image is quite blurry and takes a few head scratching moments before I realise I haven't turned the VC (Tamrons Vibration Control) off. LOL 

 

That's strange.  I don't have any issues with VR on the tripod on any of my Nikon lenses or my Sigma.  I'd never even heard of this before!

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That's strange.  I don't have any issues with VR on the tripod on any of my Nikon lenses or my Sigma.  I'd never even heard of this before!

yeah the Nikons are fine.  Its just the Tamron.  The VC in Tamrons is very 'aggressive'.  Off the Tripod you don't really notice the VR on the Nikons doing its thing but you notice the Tamron 'grabbing' the image and freezing it.  Works great but guessing the method used between VR and VC is different and why the Tamron needs to be switched off when on the tripod.

 

Cheers

Slog

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Brian,

 

"Shake Return" is the name Canon gave to the 'feedback loop' problem in Canon lenses.  Canon is correcting this problem on their "L" lenses with an algorithm that recognizes when the lens is mounted to a tripod.  If your Canon lens has "IS II", it is a newer version and the 'feedback loop' has been fixed.    

Here's the link to Canon and a detailed explanation about "Shake return":  http://cpn.canon-europe.com/content/education/technical/image_stabilization_lenses.do

Tamron lenses also needs the VC turned off.  After reading through numerous Tamron lens instruction manuals, it appears the Tamron VC needs to be turned off due to numerous issues.

 

Also, Slog misquoted me, which lead to the confusion.  Here's my original statement:

Also, if you're using a tripod and have older Canon lens, be sure to turn the image stabilization off due to 'Shake Return'.  Canon is slowly fixing this. 

More information can be found here:  http://cpn.canon-europe.com/content/education/technical/image_stabilization_lenses.do

-vs-

Also, if you're using a tripod be sure to turn the image stabilization off due to 'Shake Return'.

 

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Dee Dee,

 

I generalised your statement to reduce confusion.  

 

Taking your original quote on face value people may get the impression that only older Canon lenses suffer from stabilisation feedback whereas it is common knowledge that you turn off lense stabilisation when fitting a camera to a tripod regardless of the system in use. (DSLRs with lense stabilisation as I don't know how systems with in-body stabilisation is affected) 

 

Nikons VR doesn't seem to care but it is still good practice to turn it off.  Even though my current Nikkors are not effected who's to say others in their line-up will be.

 

In summary turn off the VR, VC, IS etc when putting your camera on a tripod regardless of the lenses you use and you won't go wrong.

 

Cheers

Slog 

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