JerseyCity Frankie

Yawl Dulcibella by JerseyCity Frankie - scale 1:48, 1897 fictional vessel from the novel Riddle of the Sands

71 posts in this topic

The more rounded shackles are ubiquitous everywhere in historic sail and I can't say I have ever seen "d" or flat shackles anywhere outside of maybe stainless steel ones on Marconi rigged modern boat halyards. The oldest shackles I've actually seen and worked with had an elongation and taper to them but they were still all of the rounded shaped variety. I will keep an open mind though and if I see "d" shackles in period photographs I will have to consider them.

mtaylor and thibaultron like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Frankie - 

 

Very nice rigging work, as always.  I just found this log and will be following your progress.

 

If you are contemplating wire shrouds, you should look at "Accu-Flex" beading wire.  It is actual stranded metal wire that comes in a wide selection of diameters, some much finer than you will need, and others larger.  It is soft, flexible and knotable, as much as possible. You can obtain it through Fire Mountain Gems on the net at  

http://www.firemountaingems.com/shop/accu_flex?navsrc=left_AccuFlexBeadingWire&T=T1B  

 

Best of success

 

Dan

 

 

thibaultron and mtaylor like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Frankie;

Just started reading this thread. Great model. I had never heard of this book, now thanks to you, I've downloaded both the book and the audio book. Looking forward to reading/hearing it!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

mtaylor likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Thibaultron. The book Riddle of the Sands is a bit dry for an adventure novel as it was written 100 years ago. I first tried to read it 15 years ago and found it too slow paced but recently when I finally DID give it proper time I really enjoyed it. 

thibaultron and mtaylor like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A served up and seized eyes into my shrouds. The sewing thread I served it with was a light brown and I had assumed I would have stained it darker with diluted acrylic paint. But then I made the whimsical choice to actually use actual tar as in real practice. Has this been done by anyone recently? I can't think of a good reason not to give it a try, I don't think the tar can do anything to hurt the serving and I know it won't effect the wire. And it smells so nice! It'll take a while to dry though.

IMG_0929.JPG

IMG_0930.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read this book years ago and donated my copy to a book sale.  After being inspired by this thread, I bought a new copy to read again.  The movie is worthwhile too- good sailing shots and an interesting Edwardian era German gunboat.

 

Congratulations, Frankie on a fine model.

 

Roger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking ahead to the blocks now that I have a good idea of how many I need and where they will go in the rig. 26 blocks all together. A yacht this size would likely have just a few 11" or 12" blocks for the main sheet and the mainsail halyards, the rest are going to be 8" 10" and a bunch of even smaller ones for the Jigger. As mentioned above somewhere, I dont have many commercially made blocks small enough so I'm moving ahead with one of those crazy schemes I have always had in my head but never had a reason to implement: I'm going to make the blocks out of paper.

Laminated paper.100% rag artist paper. It'll be just like making blocks out of wood, just with no actual wood. I'm unhappy with the way wood behaves under a sertain size, its tendency to split under even a veery sharp xacto blade has ruined countless widgets I was building over the years. Laminated paper always cuts like butter. Paper is available in any color. Varnished or soaked in super glue, i believe it will be durable and long lived. I may be crazy but I'm not crazy enough to build tiny little sheves in these blocks.

IMG_0987.JPG

IgorSky and mtaylor like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An issue I have with literally passing a tiny thread through the hole bored in a tiny block and pretending this looks like a rel block is the way the thread behaves, its never going to have the scale suppleness of a full scale line passing around the sheave of an actual block at full scale. The thread pokes out either side of the block and doesn't bend down to the belaying point or the load very realistically, so I'm gluing the "running rigging" in place so it will enter and leave the block at the angle I want, not the angle the stiffness of the thread allows for. I'm building up a sandwich of layers of laminated paper cut into the lozenge shape of a block. Later I will strop them but I have not got that far yet, here is what I have so far:

IMG_0988.JPG

IMG_0989.JPG

IMG_0991.JPG

IMG_0994.JPG

IMG_0995.JPG

IMG_1004.JPG

IMG_0999.JPG

IgorSky and thibaultron like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a comparison of some commercial blocks with my fake paper blocks. Note the angle of the line entering and leaving the block. Not a fair comparison without the ends being attached to anything but illustrating my point about the built-in stiffness of the thread. The contours of the paper blocks were all achieved with the xacto blade alone.this is certainly labor intensive but on the other hand I only need twenty five blocks. If I was building a larger three masted vessel I'd certainly find a way to live with the commercially available blocks. 

IMG_0998.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A second round of block making, this time I'm trying to make the smallest blocks I can manage. When these are trimmed into a rough lozenge shape, I paint them with Testor enamel,flat Brown paint. I wind up with a wide range of sizes, I make more than I will need so as to be able later to select only the nicer ones for use on the model. All of them have a line running "through" the block and the two legs are made long so as to fit anywhere on the rig. M anticipating trouble later when I will need a different lead on some blocks than I'm providing for on my assembly line but I figure I can do those blocks on a case by case basis. Still no strops on any of these blocks. I'm tempted to make the strops out of three strands of wire twisted to look like rope, then paint these to look like natural fiber line. I imagine this will make stropping eisier? 

IMG_1070.JPG

IMG_1073.JPG

IMG_1074.JPG

IMG_1077.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.