DocBlake

Independence 1775 by DocBlake - Artesania Latina - 5/16" scale.

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I've seen that reference also, Ken.  No other information on "Independence" exists as far as I know.  But there must have been at least a dozen colonial schooners that we have no record of, maybe more.  Any name might be appropriate!

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I completed two sets of bitts - one for each mast - and the ship's belfry (which also has running rigging belayed to it). I also finished the quarterdeck stairs.  The plans call for a stairway on each side between the gun ports as well as boarding steps on the exterior hull above the wales.  Neither Halifax, Sultana nor Chaleur had this feature, so I'm not adding the boarding stairs to this model, either!   Next are the elm tree pumps, the catheads and the cannons.

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I'm trying to decide what wood to use fashioning the catheads .  My choices are boxwood, Rosewood, swiss pear or the stock walnut.  Here are two photos of the deck furniture set in place.  What do you all think?  I'm leaning rosewood vs. boxwood.

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Thanks, guys.  The bell came with the kit - I just redesigned and rebuilt the belfry.  As to the catheads, since the deck is bowood, I'd like a little more contrast.  The quarterdeck and poop deck railings are going to be rosewood, so maybe having the catheads rose wood is too much.  I'm leaning toward the swiss pear.

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Hello Dave,

 

Deck furniture looks very good contrasting with deck planks!

 

Regards,

Stoyne

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Thanks, Stoyne!

 

I'm looking ahead to masting and rigging.  I'll need to fabricate the masts from scratch.  They are 5/16" diameter at the base and this size is not generally commercially available.  I don't want to use the walnut supplied in the kit because of the big pore/wide open grain.  My choice is down to cherry or swiss pear.  The areas of the mast doublings will be dyed black.  Black spars will definitely be made of swiss pear, natural spars of birch.  Because of the black doublings, I'm leaning toward swiss pear for the masts.  Any opinions?

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You can never go wrong with swiss pear it always looks good, although, I would have a hard time painting or staining it. Mostly because I don't have a huge slab of it in my shop ;)  :P

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With the completion of the elm tree pumps, the deck furniture is complete.  The pumps in the kit were cast metal and awful!  I just received my cannons today.  I bought 6 pewter cannons from the Lumberyard:  Their 1/4" scale 4 pounders are exactly as long as a 3 pounder in 5/16" scale which is what I need .  The carriages are supposed to be swiss pear, but they aren't terribly pink, and the wood itself isn't surfaced the best - kingd of rough.  I may need to make these from scratch.

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I decided to make my masts and sprit out of swiss pear.  They need to be 5/16" in diameter at the base, and tapered.  Obviously there is no commercial source so I'll make my own.  The first step is to drill a 21/64" hole in some mild steel.  Then I cut out mast blanks on the table saw a hair larger that the hole.  I sharpened the tip of the blanks, then chucked them into my 1/2" electric drill.  Using the steel as a drawplate, I pushed the spinning wood through the hole.  The resulting dowels were a bit rough, bu I have at least 1/64 to play with and they clean up easily.  Once they're at 5/16", I'll taper them.  Here's a photo of the blanks and the resulting unsanded dowels.  I also linked to a You Tube video showing the technique.

 

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I like how you opted for the slanted coaming similar to the Armed Sloop/Patrick Henry. Makes for an interesting contrast as does the color contrasts in the wood :)

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After a nice, relaxing vacation, I'm back working in "Independence".  I made the new main mast and foremast out   of swiss pear, tapered them and squared the tops where the doublings are.  The topmasts are made of maple.  The bowsprit is pear and the jib boom is maple also.  Since I plan to dye the masts black between the doublings, the cheeks, trestletrees, crosstrees and bolsters will all be pear, also.  I placed a sailor on the quarterdeck to give a sense of scale.

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Good to hear your holiday was relaxing, nice work Dave. The swiss pear and maple look good together

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Really great job; I enjoy watching your log.

What scale is the sailor?

Cheers.

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 Thanks, guys!

 

Ken:  The sailor is 44mm tall, which is 5'6" in scale height...typical height for a man in the mid to late 18th century.

 

Clare hess chose to stain his masts black between the doublings.  I think it looks good and I've added a photo of the result.  But I also like the look of pear and maple, without any black stain, as my masts appear now.  I've not yet cut the topmasts to length nor made the fids.  what do you all think?  Black stain or natural wood?

 

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The black doublings are a typical treatment and it looks good.

 

Russ

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Its been awhile since I last visited your build. What a beauty she has become. Great work. Well done.

Looks very nicely and neatly rigged.

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I tend to agree, Don.  The ship is "stylized" anyway.  Bulwarks are redheart, not vivid red pain, and the planking below the wales is all holly, and it doesn't follow the waterline.  The detail at the doublings is some of the most interesting on the ship and I think it tends to get lost with the black dye.

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The way I see it Dave, you have gone to all this work "painting with wood" why crap out now and use paint or stain. Carry on, it is looking super!!

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I'm finishing up the masts.  The plans call for boom rests on both the main mast as well as the fore mast.  This is similar to what was found on "Hannah", "Chaleur" and "Gaspee".  "Sultana" and "Halifax" had boom rests on the main mast only, the sails on the fore masts being loose-footed.  As you can see from the pictures, Chaluer's fore mast boom rest was quite a way up the mast compared to  Independence.  The rest is only 3' 8" above the deck on  Independence, while the main is 6' above the deck.  By contrast, Hannah's fore mast boom rest is 5'6" above deck , according to Hahn's plan.  So while it would be okay to have booms on both the main and the fore masts, the boom rest on the fore mast should be raised significantly higher.  I'm leaning toward no boom rest on the foremast, with a loose-footed fore sail.  What do you all think?

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Chaleur      chaleur.jpg

Hannah      hannah.jpg

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On the Chaleur and Hannah, the fore mast boom rest causes the boom to be 'levell' with the main mast boom.  That looks right to me.

On the other hand, a lot of photos of these type boats have a loose-footed sail on the fore mast.  I'd choose between these two options.

Just my 2 cents.

Cheers.

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