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Jack12477

Willie L. Bennett Skipjack by Jack12477 - FINISHED - Model Shipways - 1:32 Scale

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Soldering in general gives me problems, Carl.  For this I have to construct the oyster dredges, A-frame, side rollers for the dredges and not sure what else of the top of my head.  I have the tools for soldering, just have to perfect the technique. :(

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Actual silver soldering isn't needed.  Try Stay-Brite a silver bearing solder that melts at a much lower temp than silver solder but higher than soft solder.  It can be blackened unlike soft solder and is plenty strong enough for the job.  Parts need to be clean and adjacent joints need to be protected from getting too hot - heat sinks or clay as a heat sink around the previous joint do the job.

Kurt

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If you can get at all the joints the emery paper works fine.  I use heated Sparex in a small croc pot to clean the parts before and after soldering.  Either way, clean the residue off and then wipe with alcohol.  Don't touch the joint area with your bare hands and use a good flux - I like to use a paste flux - as the bits of solder stick to it better than the liquids.  Heat the joint until the solder flows and then back the heat off immediately.  The joint should be good.

 

I have used a Smith Little Torch for several years and it does a great job as the heat can be varied by the size tip used.  I have started to use a resistance soldering unit in the last year and like it a lot.  You can certainly use one of the larger soldering irons with the Stay-Brite but the pencil types probably will not heat the metal enough.

 

Remember to heat the metal, not the solder.  The solder will melt and flow to the heat.  If able heat the back side of the joint with the solder on the face and the solder will flow into the joint.

 

Kurt

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Kurt, the soldering iron I'm using is a Weller brand model WPS18MP Pro Series. Specs say it is equivalent to 60 watt iron and will reach 900 degree F in 35 secs, even tho it's an 18 watt. Is this adequate?

 

Also I have Worthington brand water soluble lead-free paste flux, Worthington brand petroleum based paste flux and Harris brand Stay-Clean liquid flux (came with the Stay-Brite solder package). What is the difference among these flux?

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Jack,

 

This is a pretty little boat with great lines.  I built one some years ago.  It was by first scratch project so I traveled all over the Eastern Shore taking pictures of the Skipjacks still working.  This was in the late 70's.  I think at that time there were 18 still working.  I could not find good plans for the Winder at the time so left that for later and never finished it.  Got to get back on that sometime soon.  Nice job, good luck, and let me know if I can be of any help.  I bought a lot of books and took a lot of pictures during as well as after I finished mine.  This may have been mentioned in an earlier post and if so I apologize but Ben Lankfords book WaterCraft  A Modeler's Handbook had a lot of valuable information in it.

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Jack:

I am not familiar with the paste fluxes you mention but both should work.  The Worthington would be my first pick to try as the Stay-Brite is lead free.  I used the flux that came with the Stay-Brite for years until I ran out and tried some paste flux I had in the shop and liked the way it can be applied in just the right spot w/o running and then the small chips of solder can be placed right onto the flux and it stays in place w/o sliding off.

 

Sounds like the Weller unit should work - the parts aren't very big so should heat up OK.  Give it a try - on scrap pieces.

 

Kurt

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Practice Practice and more Practice, we have all gone through it when we decided to learn. You will get there, just takes time

 

Oh I am getting a lot of practice, Joe.  ;)  Getting an "E" for Effort but an "F" in completion :( :( ;) ;) ;)

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You might want to try silver solder paste. It is available in different melting temperature and the flux and solder are mixed together. I just use Medium. It can be applied to small joints in very small amounts using a toothpick (cocktail stick). One source is Rio Grande

They say it's best used within 6 months of purchase, but I've had mine for over a year and it's still working just fine. I use a butane torch (Blazer GB2001) to heat the metal. There are a few advantages to using silver solder. It can be blackened. You can apply tiny amounts so there's no build-up of extra solder that has to be cleaned off. It's very strong.

 

It does take a while to get used to soldering this way, but once you get the hang of it, it's pretty easy. One key is that the parts to be soldered must touch each other and the solder will stick only where the parts actually touch. Silver solder does not fill gaps like regular solder does. The other thing to be careful of is that you can easily melt small brass pieces with the torch. That's where the practice comes in. I recently made some small shackles and on my website I show how I soldered them. In the third image, you can just barely see the solder on the joints before heating with the torch. You can't see the solder at all once they are finished. I don't think I could have done these with an iron.

 

Because silver solder paste comes in different melting temperatures, in theory you can solder one joint with hard, then an adjacent joint with medium or easy without melting the first joint. I say in theory because I've never tried it myself. I suspect that would take even more practice.

 

All of that said, I also use Staybright sometimes. If you're soldering a larger joint, you can cut off small pieces of the Staybright and lay them against the fluxed joint. It melts quickly and flows nicely. I still use a torch in that case. I don't use an iron at all any more. The torch provides instant heat. I also have a resistance soldering unit and there are a few times when I find it useful but I likely wouldn't buy it again if I had it to do over. It's pretty expensive.

 

Cheers -

John

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Thanks, John, I'll take a look at it. Right now I'm using an iron with a tip temperature of 900 F and StayBrite brand solder with an acid-free petroleum based paste flux. My problem might be not having the two pieces in tight contact. Will have to check again.

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Jack:

Practice with two pieces of flat stock with some flux and Stay-Brite.  Set them end to end with one piece overlapping the other - with the flux between the two pieces where they overlap with just a bit of squeeze out at the end of the piece on top and some small bits of the solder atop the flux right at the joint.  Heat the brass where it is two layers thick just a bit back from where it overlaps.  When the brass gets hot enough the flux will melt and shortly after that the solder should flow.  When it flows remove the heat - the job is done at that point and heating it longer will hurt the joint.  Let it cool a bit, use a pliers or tweezer to pick up the part and dip it in water.  You should have a good joint.  Once you see the solder melt and know what to look for you should be good to go.  Remember the solder will flow to the heat.  If the solder balls up you got it hot before the metal.

Hope this helps.

Take care,

Kurt

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Hi Jack

 

My but you sure have come up with a lot of very different ideas in building your Skip Pack they sure do  make your little ship unique that is for sure. It sounds like to me that you are letting your soldering iron become to hot, that can cause you all kinds of trouble. Try cleaning your tip with an old rag , dipping the tip in your flux and then tint the tip with a bit of solder , it should hold the solder and ready to apply to your joint. This takes a bit of practice, work on some scrap pieces for a bit, making sure that they are clean with emery or steal wool and lightly fluxed, have fun, you will get it , it just takes a bit of time,                                                                                         ENJOY.

 

Regards   Lawrence

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you'll succeed Jack........we're all pull'in for ya  ;)      I use a flux too........as well as the core that is in the solder rod.   I use a light electronic's solder.                    technique is half the battle.......all I can add is,   to insure that the joint to be soldered is clean.   I use a Q-tip to dab on a tiny amount of flux......then I heat it to activate the flux.  if the joint is hot enough,  touching it with the solder,  should be enough for it to melt into the joint.  as this is happening,  pull the iron away.....it won't be needed.   a little will go a long way  ;)

 

I use steel wool to clean the tip of my Iron.......followed by what Lawrence does ;)   a clean tip is a happy tip  :D

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Thanks Lawrence & Dennis for the advice and encouragement. Yes, I am slowly starting to get the hang of it. Got the two dredge roller support brackets soldered after several failed attempts :( Now I just have to do some fine tuning before I can install them. Photos will follow in a bit. And thanks to all who hit the Like button.

 

Question: What do you use to clean the brass parts after soldering? Vinegar, soap & water, ???

Edited by Jack12477

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Well, i finally figured out how to solder brass. Not the best results but pretty good for a first time effort.  Haven't decided whether I want to leave them as a dirty worn look brass or paint them black.  (Don't have any Blacken-It solution).  Right now they are just dry fit in place.  This is the port side view. Starboard still needs the vertical roller. Oh and I have to plug the misaligned hole I cut in the channel.

post-13502-0-29130200-1475762586_thumb.jpgpost-13502-0-72948300-1475762586_thumb.jpgpost-13502-0-69088100-1475762585_thumb.jpg

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