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KeithAug

Nautical Adventures.

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John

 

Yes it was a rental - the charterer was managing the boat on behalf of the owner. As explained earlier it was built to a class standard for racing. Unfortunately the repair reinforcement increased its weight and made it uncompetitive. The owner was very cross.

 

We had insurance but lost our deposit.

 

Another moral - never rent out your pride and joy.

 

I once sailed on a maxi call Drum (owned by Simon Le Bon of Duran Duran). It too had a keel problem - it fell off leaving it floating up side down with Mr Le Bon and 5 others inside). It was a long time after the keel incident that I had my trip and no celebs were present.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-35811828

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I understand the problem with the keel, even at steerage you weren't taking on water, and damaged as bad as it was couldn't it have just broken off, then you would be like Duran & Duran??? :Whew:

 

Bet the Dock master stood you no refreshments.

 

Funny have you thought about power instead of sail methinks it may be safer and healthier for you and your crew. 

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John

 

I once hired a small power boat on Lake Powell. Had it for a day and motored about 100 miles. Had to refuel twice at a cost of about $300. It seemed to be quite an expensive hobby when compared with sailing. A yachts fuel costs are usually about $90 for the week.

 

The keel on our yacht seemed to be quite well attached despite the hull damage. Two of us were mechanical engineers and our assessment was that it would be ok. However that reminds me of another nautical story where my best engineering efforts ended in a farcical outcome!!!!! More later.

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Keith,

 

Yes fuel is more expensive, the wind is free when its blowing, power will get you there when becalmed, also you have no keel to ground you or rip the bottom out of your boat, or do a Duran Duran oopsy daisy, also explore the shallows where sail won't go. I know your response we have a dingy, yes but from your posted stories and pub outings   :cheers: :cheers:  :cheers:      y'all do not fair well or use good judgement when landing on the beach another oopsy daisy.   :o

 

Bring on another there all really great, well written, and entertaining. 

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Nautical Adventures # 5

Surf & Turf

1980 Post Hurricane Frederick no bridge to mainland 1979 to 1983

Phone rings 2am Dauphin Island Fire Department we need you and Sybile (wife an ACLS paramedic me just an EMT) to go to the Holiday Inn a man has fallen off the 2nd story balcony (no particulars)

We arrive and find the victim laying on the ground bleeding from a head wound Sybile tries to assess he is extremely inebriated, a woman bending over him trying to force pills down his throat (his wife) she is in the same condition:champagne-popping-smiley-emotic both are cursing and combative with each other. This is in the area of the lounge we have a crowd of drunks egging them on and yelling advice to Sybile and I. While I am attempting some kind of crowd control and separating wife from hubby a gentleman nudges Sybile while she is attempting to put a collar on his neck and stabilize his head and says its okay I am a doctor he is also inebriated.:champagne-2: Sybile moves to the side the doctor grabs the guys head and twists it left and right and says he’s okay. We stare at each other in horror hoping he has not paralyzed this guy. Asked him what kind of doctor he is he replies drunkenly I am a veterinarian,:wacko: I shove him out of the way Sybile continues aiding the victim thank God 2 more EMTS arrive with backboard straps etc. I can now take care of the crowd and advise them in not so gentle terms go back in the lounge or all will spend the night in jail, thankfully all complied (we had no jail).

Back to wife and hubby Sybile and the EMTS stabilized the victim and placed him in the rescue vehicle wife is continuously interfering, still trying to give him pills, I snatched the bottle out of her hand (Xanax) and not so kindly shoved her to the side and threatened to put her in restraints hubby screaming the ----- is trying to kill me, she pushed me off the balcony (witnesses at the scene had confirmed this).

Cannot get a C.G helicopter (before life flight) weather bad severe high winds rain. We arrive at patrol boat wife attempted to inject a substance into the I.V. Sybile started, I grabbed it (found out later in the rest of the story she was an RN, damn where is she keeping all these pills and syringes I confiscated her purse. She’s screaming it’s just a sedative.:omg:

We load him, wife, Sybile, and 2 EMTS in the boat. We called for an ambulance to meet us at Cedar Point. The trip took an hour and a half due to the weather, which normally would be a twenty minute trip. There still screaming at each other. We finally arrive, transfer him and wife to ambulance crew and offer to ride with them explaining the difficult problems with both of them. They declined by insulting us and stating they were the professionals, okay (we told you so). Halfway back to the Island we heard them screaming for assistance to any Deputy in the area, we have two subjects out of control we cannot continue transport without assistance. ;)I had advised Mobile P.D. may be a possible murder attempt and have a detective proceed to the hospital.

As Paul Harvey says the rest of the story. I returned and obtained statements from witnesses that actually saw wife push hubby over the balcony. They could hear the argument in the lounge and came outside to see what was going on. As I stated earlier the pills were Xanax, the syringe was Demerol, all was turned in to Mobile P. D. with witness statements the following morning.

They resided in Mississippi where my brother in law lived at the time; he knew them she was a staff RN at the hospital where he worked. Not long after this she was arrested in Mississippi for attempted murder was eventually convicted and went to Jail.

I have no idea how folks like this find the Island there has to be a magnet buried somewhere. If I ever find it I’ll dig it up and dump it 30 miles offshore.

I shortened this one there was so much more but as they say only for those with the need to know.

 

 

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A week sailing with the Boy Scouts, with two kittens and an adult cat on board. Including a "Man Overboard" incident when one of the Scouts dropped his hat in the water! Wouldn't wait for me to get the boat hook, and my boarding ladder had been left ashore.

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You are a better man than I John.

I would have had the wife in cuffs and possibly used her as bait in trolling for Crocks on the way to the ambulance meet, and handed what was left over to the local PD!

 

Kind of strange that she would be charged in Mississippi for a crime committed in Alabama though.  

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Lou,

 

I wasn't clear on that  she  tried to kill him months later in Mississippi, I found this out later from my brother in law that worked at the same hospital she was a nurse at. These folks were pretty prominent and were involved in a bitter divorce. I had relayed the story to him earlier and asked him if he knew them since they lived in the same area. Nothing out of Alabama husband did not want to pursue, I had bagged, tagged, dated, timed and signed all and sent with ambulance attendants on follow up with MPD it disappeared at the hospital so MPD dumped did not pursue it. The Demerol was a controlled substance she probably lifted from the hospital planning this ahead of time. We were just glad they were gone. Worked out good for him he ended up with everything. They probably sobered up at the hospital and were lovey-dovey just a good old domestic.

 

I could not place restraints on her in the boat if something happened she fell and injured herself or her husband pushed her overboard be my bottom.


 

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Different times & places I guess.

In my day you didn't need to have the husband make a complaint in the commission of a felony. I always took attempted homicide as relatively serious. 

 

We were NEVER allowed to transport a combative, suicidal, or any prisoner WITHOUT handcuffing them first! Too dangerous to my precious hide and anyone else involved. There were even a couple of times that I had to do feet as well, (Women in both cases).

 

Yes most times they do sober up and play kissy kissy until the next time but by then they are the problem of the DAs office not mine! Domestic issues and druggies are in my opinion one of the bigger wastes of enforcement time, (And dangerous) If people can't get along without violence they should not be provided with constant protection from each other when they constantly get back together, and the street drug abuse we see today that they keep calling "an Epidemic" on TV is a direct result of trying to "Help" by not only providing assistance in their addiction but in creating a non critical atmosphere where they no longer feel a need to dump the behavior because it really " Isn't their fault." If they had to really face the results of their chosen lifestyle it would be pretty much self correcting. May sound kind of heartless but you can not help someone who has no interest in getting help. Those who are interested will almost always make it sooner or later. Darwin may have had the right idea all along.

 

 

Time to get off my box and go back into the corner where I belong.

 

 

 

 

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    On the lighter side of adventures was my snorkeling excursion to Molikini ( a small submerged volcanic cinder cone off the coast of Maui) via a catamaran tour boat.  Back at the end of Oct. 94, when I was still walking, (but starting to have alot of difficulty with stairs) my wife and I with our two best friends Chris and Mark took a 2 1/2 week vacation to Maui.  Up to this point in my life I had never been sailing before on a lake much less on the ocean, but Mark and I were really excited about doing some more snorkeling and the trip was not too expensive so off we went.

     I wasn't so impressed with the trip out as it was under power rather than sail and we didn't see much or hear anything over the engine noise, but that would change on the way back.  The snorkeling was great as we encountered just about every kind of marine life except for whales, including a manta ray and several different kinds of sharks! 

    We had been in the water for over an hour when we swam back to our boat to get back on board.  At this point I was somewhat fatigued.  When trying to climb up the rope ladder, I found that I didn't have the strength to climb up. (As whenever I put my feet on the rungs I just ended up pushing the ladder against the hull which was sloping down and away from me.)  

    However, Mark had gotten aboard before me and told the crew of my strength problems with MD.  After a short discussion the crew had an easy solution for the problem.  Two of the crewmen aboard each reached a hand down to me and easily lifted me aboard!  Then everyone had a great lunch served on board just before heading back in.   

    That was when they decided that we should take a vote on weather or not to go back in under sail or power.  The crew said that the wind was just right for sailing the boat back in.  With a unanimous vote it was decided to sail!  The crew even let some of us help raise sail. 

    Once we got going I was a bit surprised at just how quiet it was without all the engine noise.   It was like a hush came over our whole group, as everyone started enjoying a bit of tranquility.  Our boat was cutting through the waves with just the sound of wind and water rushing by.  After sailing for a few more minutes everyone became very excited when we came along one enormous sea turtle swimming alongside our boat.  As we passed him by he was replaced by a small pod of dolphins. They kept pace with us for most of the return trip, with two of them so close we could almost reach out and touch them!  

    Now, the snorkeling was great, but both Mark and I told our wives that the sailing part of our trip was by far the best.   My friend Mark has just passed recently, but our trip to Molikini is one of my favorite memories of him. 

    

 

    

 

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It was not under sail, (At least not for me) but I have had a couple of times that were kind of like that. Something like 30 +- years ago I was taking a friend across the sound on the ferry to see a Museum and visit the USS Missouri that at that time was docked over there. In route the ferry approached three Orca whales that were going almost as fast as the ferry, I believe we were doing about 15 or 16 knots, possibly a little faster. They looked like they were neither frightened by the ferry or straining to keep up the speed they were swimming. I was really impressive when we passed them by from probably sixty or so feet. That was nothing though for two sail boats that were going in the same direction and the whales swam within ten feet of the boats going by at almost double their speed!

 

Years later I was on another ferry going to another point when a mother, yearling, and baby Orca started following the ferry from half way across the sound. They kept pretty much right at the surface and you could almost hear the mother saying, "Look at the big can of humans." They followed us al the way into the port and didn't turn around until the ferry slowed down for the final approach to the landing. I suspect we were somewhere between "Take the kids to the Zoo" day and "School" day.

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Here is a re-run since it is my 48th anniversary

 

Nautical Adventure Anniversary Rerun

Could not locate original post

Anniversary June 12, 1970

Had planned the perfect one year anniversary, I ordered Maine Lobsters I picked up from the Mobile Airport and bought 2 killer steaks filets, with the last of our mad money (money put away for special occasions)

Six months prior I had purchased a used 17 foot wood lap strake Thompson with an antique 50 hp Johnson motor. It had a huge power head and about the smallest foot and prop and burned about 8 gallons an hour a real guzzler.  We love the water and the boat was in rough shape,  she knew I could make the repairs price was right a whopping $ 600.00 we became proud boat owners. I spent several months restoring had to burn off several layers of paint, and varnish, repaired canvas frame, rebuilt windshield frame and installed new glass, painted all did not re-varnish Mahogany since the boat would not be under cover. All turned out great, were ready for launching on our anniversary, plans were to ride around the Island and stay pretty close to home just in case some un-foreseen problem arose.

Mama looked real good had hair coifed (word for expensive do we didn’t have the bucks for but looked good) looked forward to a great day on the water, a fantastic dinner, and maybe some late evening aerobics.

Well the unforeseen happened sputter, sputter Oh poo.  Engine stalled Mama said what happened I said we’ll see. I threw out the hook and began to troubleshoot. Fuel line connected, checked gas, checked fuel lines for air, checked for short and wiring, checked plugs all was good would not crank. An hour later Mama says well now what voice still calm but rising a couple of octaves.  Wind was picking up but we were inshore near the seawall that follows the channel.

 I said I’ll throw out the anchor a couple of times and pull us to the seawall, then we can walk it around to the launch (about a 1 ½ miles) she says well just get me to the house (bad moon rising). Well we get to the seawall and walk it around about halfway absolutely no traffic on a week day to get a tow, Mama getting a little hotter I say where almost there. Wind picked up and we could barely keep boat off the seawall I said I am going to get in the water and pull you keep boat off the seawall.  The channel next to seawall is only 4 foot deep boat wakes have pushed sand against the wall. I hop overboard and begin to pull Mama keeps boat off seawall with a boat hook she’s not talking any more, this is a really bad sign. She’s having trouble so I suggest we both need to be in the water I’ll pull you keep stern off, I cannot repeat here what was said as it would even offend the most hardened listener,  being wet tired and peeved she jumped in and we eventually made it to the landing. Her new do was now plastered to her face and she was glowing red and it wasn’t a fever, Just before loading the boat on the trailer I tried the key and the engine fired up (this was a very bad mistake) she just missed my head with the boat hook and she would have made a priest say 10,000 Hail Marys.

Well we returned home, forget dinner, and a couch is a lonely place. Did not see Mama until next morning, she was calm cool and collected I made her favorite breakfast, turned out to be a better day did not mention the word boat.

That night we had the steak and lobster for dinner retired early sans couch.

I left the boat on the trailer for a couple of weeks did not even mention the word boat. Then it was a full moon and the blue crabs would be shedding their shells. (When a crab sheds a shell, before a bigger one takes its place they can’t move and you pole the boat along the shore with a light and small net and scoop them up, and you fry the whole crab after cleaning.) Well Mama has an affinity for soft shell crabs and suggested we launch the boat. With some trepidation we went crabbing, boat worked fine and Mama got her soft shell crabs.

All cool but we never ever set foot again in a boat on our anniversary.

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Great story John

Did you clear the telling of this story with SWMBO?

 

You are supposed to save the "The engine died and I couldn't get her home on time" with the girl looking like she had been dragged through the bushes for the parents, BEFORE you get married! You were over a year late and did it for real so no wonder she was mad!:angry:

 

Happy 48th (And stay dry!)

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2 hours ago, John Allen said:

after the 8 years came the reprogram and remold the hubby

Heck, That program is still running in my house after something like 35 years or more! A far as she is concerned there will always be room for improvement and revision of the husband unit. It's kind of like Windows, automatic updates without notifications every week or so.  

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It is weird how my old brain works. I was looking at the shiny line supplied for rigging with my Cannon Jolle and it reminded me of nylon and polypropylene mooring lines which in turn reminded me of the Wave Dancer tragedy in 2001. On October 8, 2001, the 120-foot luxury live-aboard dive yacht Wave Dancer  carrying members of the Richmond Dive Club, was secured to a concrete dock tied outboard of the Belize Aggressor III, another Dive yacht embarking members of the RDC in southern Belize when Hurricane Iris struck. The category four hurricane, with winds of 140 mph and a storm surge of fourteen feet, ripped the Wave Dancer from its cleats when it’s combination of  nylon and polypropylene mooring lines stressed and failed tossing it like a toy across the lagoon. According to survivors from the time they heard the lines give to the time they were being rolled across the lagoon was less than 14 seconds. Passengers where disoriented and ill prepared by the Captain. When the storm subsided an hour later, 20 of the boat’s 28 occupants were dead. The investigation into the tragedy — the worst in the history of recreational diving — revealed that the boat’s owner and captain had ignored storm warnings, ignored advice from the locals on the crew to return to Belize City and disembark passengers, threatened to fire any crew member who left the boat and needlessly endangered the lives of their passengers and crew. There were so many mistakes made by this Captain that it boggles the brain, like taking a vote from the passengers on what they wanted to do.

 

 

I was certified to dive in 1973 and have well over 1000 dives made all over the world and in many conditions. I have dove off the Belize Aggressor III four times and  I have been on a dive boat during a hurricane ( Cayman Aggressor, Hurricane Ike)  with a competent Captain.

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Roger,

 

It never ceased to amaze me over 25 plus years the unprofessional, and careless approach of boat captains in regard to passenger safety. We had a ferry transporting passengers certified by the Coast Guard, 42 feet had 3 sistered ribs that flexed with the seas and the battery cables were held on with vise grips (explosion waiting to happen). That was minor many far worse. They should have arrested that captain and charged him with manslaughter, he was probably working under other documentation or in an area where he could not be prosecuted shameful.

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22 minutes ago, John Allen said:

Roger,

 

It never ceased to amaze me over 25 plus years the unprofessional, and careless approach of boat captains in regard to passenger safety. We had a ferry transporting passengers certified by the Coast Guard, 42 feet had 3 sistered ribs that flexed with the seas and the battery cables were held on with vise grips (explosion waiting to happen). That was minor many far worse. They should have arrested that captain and charged him with manslaughter, he was probably working under other documentation or in an area where he could not be prosecuted shameful.

As I recall this was his first time as Captain. He was found guilty of negligence and not allowed to Captain again in Belize. The second  Captain was also found guilty of negligence and had his Captain License pulled for five years. The second Captain got screwed IMO. He did all he could but was over ridden by the Captain, what else could he do? The worst part is the vast majority of  Five million insurance money went to the charter company to salvage the boat. Almost nothing went to the victims families.

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On 6/13/2018 at 10:49 AM, Jim Rogers said:

I was certified to dive in 1973 and have well over 1000 dives made all over the world and in many conditions.

    While I have never been certified to dive, back in 62 I think it was, I was talked into scuba diving in Lake Mendota, by my friend (?) Ernie .  This could easily be filed under the heading: Things done when young and dumb.  At this point in my life, I didn't even know how to swim! :o Anyways, he had me convinced that you didn't have to know how to swim to scuba dive as you just breathed with the regulator and propelled yourself with the flippers.

    Ernie actually had prior experience scuba diving while on vacations on the Florida coast.  He had his own equipment and brought an extra set used by his brother for me.  At first I was reluctant, as all the equipment was pretty heavy, but after breathing through the equipment with my head submerged I became more relaxed and thought it should be fun. (After all I had watched Lloyd Bridges on Sea Hunt for years, what could possibly go wrong?) :rolleyes:

    The visibility in the waters of Lake Mendota wasn't very good by shore but cleared up somewhat as we went deeper so I enjoyed seeing a lot of fresh water fish close up.  While we didn't have any difficulty during our dive of about 60 minutes, I guess that I was probably just lucky.  Sometimes, when you look back on the things that you did when you were younger, you wonder how you ever lived to be this old! :Whew:

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On 10/31/2018 at 3:30 PM, BETAQDAVE said:

Sometimes, when you look back on the things that you did when you were younger, you wonder how you ever lived to be this old! 

    Speaking of dumb things that I did when I was younger. Back in November of 85, on our second trip to Maui, we were staying in a condo near Napili beach.  It was owned by Larry and his wife Phyllis, a couple of my wife’s hair salon clients, who rented it out to us. Half way through our stay they also came to Maui for Phyllis to go to some condo board meetings for a few days and had rented another friends unit while they were there.

    While our wives went shopping, Larry and I decided to do some snorkeling in Napili bay.  Here is a post card view below of it from the south looking north. 

Kapalua_Bay.thumb.JPEG.b70514eeb27b721943c13e4e2ecbbd8f.JPEG

    Larry was a very athletic person and an experienced strong swimmer; I on the other hand was not athletic or experienced (just 3 or 4 snorkeling excursions) but still a good swimmer.  Of course, snorkeling is mostly floating on the surface and in salt water I was quite buoyant, so I felt that I was fairly confident (Maybe a bit too much?) in my capabilities for doing that.

    Looking at the photo above you can see where we entered the water on the south (or bottom of the photo) side of the beach.  We went out about 50 yards to the reef and swam along following the reef to the north and then to the west. 

    After snorkeling for about 20 minutes, I saw Larry deep diving down to the bottom off to my left and I guess that I became too engrossed in sightseeing and lost sight of him after that.  (That was dumb!)  I was swimming along very easily and didn’t realize that it was the current and not my swimming that made it such easy going.

    Anyways, if you look at the photo in the area of the breaking surf way off to the left, you can see just how far I was from the beach before I raised my head above water and realized that I was almost out beyond those rocks :o and thought that I better head back now!  (As I found out later, I was looking at a swim of about 250 yards.) 

    While that seemed a little daunting at first, I quickly discovered that it was going to be a lot harder than I thought.  I started swimming back but a quick look at the area around me revealed that I was making very little progress.   It was then that I realized that the current was trying to take me out to sea and it was stronger than me!  :omg: 

    All I could think about at the time was that panicking now would do me no good at all.  So the first thing I had to do was to force that sense of panic down and try to calm myself enough to figure out what I could do.  The wave action from the wind was pushing me toward the rocks and I found the current was reduced there to the point that I started making some progress.  Thankfully the fact that I could use my snorkel to make breathing easier and flippers to aid my swimming, made my chances of getting back much better.  

    While this gave me some hope, it also made me realize that going up on the rocks wasn’t really good either, as they were volcanic in nature and quite sharp. (Blood in the water is not a good thing with sharks around.)  Not to mention the fact that there were many things best not to touch including many moray eels that resided there and wouldn’t appreciate me sticking a hand or foot in their face! (More blood!)  So, I found myself caught between a rock and a hard place so to speak.

    Now, having to think fast, I came up with a compromise solution to swim close to the rocks, to watch closely, and to very carefully place a hand on them whenever I came too close and push myself away.  The fact that I was making some good progress told me that it was a good plan, although a very long and exhausting one.

    Obviously I made it back, but I was so exhausted when I finally made it to the beach, that I literally crawled up on it and laid there for quite some time catching my breath before I could even sit up.  Larry had come ashore before me and soon came down to meet me with my towel and asked me how things went out there.  I just told him that the snorkeling was great but that I was just a bit tired.

     I guess that I just didn’t want to admit that I had really gotten myself in trouble.  :blush: Besides, if we said anything about it to the admiral she might want to curtail any more of my snorkeling.  While on the one hand it was an incident that I was probably lucky to survive, it was still one of the activities that I liked the most about being on Maui and I didn’t want that.  Oh well, I guess I'll just bite my tongue and mark it up as another close call.  :Whew:(To this day I still haven’t said anything to the admiral about it.)

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It sounds like you were fighting a rip current.  We have a long sand beach here that forms the Western end of Lake Superior.  When conditions are right, usually an East wind, rip currents form.  Over the years there have been several fatalities.  These currents flow in a circular pattern so if you happen to be in an area were the current is flowing out swimming against it just tires you out.  Those that know advise doing just what you did- swim parallel to the beach until you get out of the current’s outward flow.  The city now post warning signs and flags when rip current conditions exist.

 

Roger

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