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rwiederrich

Great Republic by rwiederrich - four masted extreme clipper - 1853

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Well...I have been planning this build for over a year.  Unlike my practice..I will not be  modifying a Revell CS hull....but will be building a scratch POB model of the Great Republic from a couple of sources.  Namely the McCann plan and those supplemented by the plans provided by Arthur H Clark, and drawings from Crothers, manuscripts and first hand wood etchings of the vessel.

 

Unlike many contemporary replications...I will be following the descriptions of her rig by Duncan McLean and Richard McKay.

 

Today I began by copying and cutting out the frame drawings and separating them into for and aft sections.

 

I hope to get the plywood this weekend and then transfer the template to it and then cut out all the bulkheads.

 

The model will be 3/32"=1'

 

Here is an image of a engraving depicting the rig I will replicate.

 

And an image of the cut templates.

 

Rob

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Thanks guys. Nenad...I've been following your CS build and am pleased by your progress...I only wish I have as much drive.

My Canadian friends are very much appreciated...your support is inspiring.

 

Sailor....I still have plans for that extra CS hull, and again I thank you for your kindness in thinking of me.

 

This new POB build will surely take me to new heights in construction.  I've only built 2 other models using the POB method...and both of those were kit based.  I'm going it alone...therefore I think the initial planking that will be used will be 2" X 1/16" X 30" material, of clear fine grain Fruitless Mulberry.  Gaining the initial hull shape will happen rapidly..permitting me a fine base to apply the second layer of planking.   I paint all my clippers...so grain and color imperfections in the wood are a moot issue.

 

Thanks again.

 

Rob

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For informational purposes it is worth repeating; A strong discrepancy was found on the McCann plan(And I've seen models built from this plan which first alerted me to this issue)

The Doubling for each mast at the Fore/Main/Mizzen mast at the attachment to the Fore/Main/Mizzen topmast is backward. Placing the topmast to the rear of the doubling.

 

The doubling on the GR was exceptionally lengthy, accommodating the Forbes topsail design which slid up and down its length.  Study has revealed the doubling error was most likely not designed, since definitive evidence is clear from first hand account etchings.  Secondly, study of other  reputable builders models can be an aid....such as Greg McKay of New Mexico who's splendid example of the GR mimics the evidence I have uncovered.

 

Second error found, absent on several noted models, along with respected author and historian Crothers have omitted the fifth deck house aft of the mizzen mast...which master model maker Donald McNarry included on his fabulous model of her. It is also mentioned in Richard McKay's book on the subject of McKay's clippers. From what I gather, there were five deck houses in addition to the helm house.

 

Among the masting errors I have noticed....the original description of the GR as described by eye witnesses is that she had a flying jib boom accompanying her jib boom....much in the same manner as McKay built the Lightning.

 

In short, it appears there is much to allow for ample artistic license as far as her sparing and rigging is concerned.  This will permit me satisfaction when she is complete.....knowing that her original build will be less recognizable then the latter. 

 

Rob

Edited by rwiederrich

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interesting Project Rob,

 

that four masted clipper ship must have been one of the largest and beautiful clippers ever built in wood. Encouraged by an article here at MSW I was curious about this ship and looked up the appropriate pages in the heritage Dec. 1935 edition of the Popular Science Magazine. (frame plan on page 95)

 

I wish you a good start with your project, and much fun with digging out, exploring and gathering all you need for that lovely build. Will be following the "rebirth" of this clipper...

 

Nils

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Thanks everyone...tomorrow(I'm at work)...I'll finish gluing the temples down and begin cutting out the dried ones.

 

After much thought..I've decided to cut out bulkhead spacers to be placed between each bulkhead at the proper distance as identified on the scale drawings.  these will provide ample strength and allow each bulkhead to be glued/nailed in proper position.  Making the framing process go quite fast.  I will then draw and cut out the keel and cutwater from the plans and add them to the framing.

 

Not sure what will cut faster the band saw or the scroll saw..... :huh:

 

Not your typical POB designed construction...but I shy away from typical.

 

Rob

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Just a construction note to inform my MSW friends.  I tend to be less concerned about attention to detail..were that the detail is not going to be visibly accessible.  I don't pay attention to the sanding of inside edges of bulkheads...or wiping away internal glue drips.  I do pay attention to proper bulkhead dressing and beveling..so that the planking will not express errors initiated by them.

 

If I were a purist at heart..these details, each in their turn would be a priority.  My goal is a sound structure...with pleasant and correct lines...that I will paint.

Please have patience as I bull my way through this initial construction process.

 

Tomorrow is a new day and I hope to get the remaining bulkheads cut out and the blocking cut and the beginning (at least) of the framing assembly begun.

When I work..I tend to move quickly...when I'm idle....the pond tends to freeze over.

 

Rob

Edited by rwiederrich

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Yeah.....cutting my own bulkheads..initially worried me...because I was relying heavily upon the drawings I collected(that's the thing about research).  Kits these days provide you with such nicely laser-cut parts...projecting from the start a clean foundation from where one can either improve or detract from.

 

I like scratch building because it provides ample levity to go in any direction that your building style or skill leads you.

 

Rob(And we're off)

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I daresay a flying start.... if we overlook the research time.  ;)    Did you go for the bandsaw or the scroll?  

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I daresay a flying start.... if we overlook the research time.  ;)    Did you go for the bandsaw or the scroll?  

Bandsaw......much faster and with a steady hand//good results.

 

Rob

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Looking forward to your progress, Rob.

 

Ed

Thanks Ed.  I changed my mind and decided to go with a firm keel..so I cut out some maple(from a tree I cut down in the yard) into full length..plained it to 1/8" and cut out the recess grooves for each bulkhead....

 

Here are some pics of the forward bulkheads mounted (test fit)

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Done cutting all the rest of the major bulkheads...now I will glue them into place and then cut and install the bulkhead spacers that will  give strength to the framing.

 

No pics right now my battery is dead and is being charged........ :(

 

Rob

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Well....I've cut the pre or false deck and glued the sections on.  It may appear out of sorts but when dry I will trim the edges and ends and sand the curved deck smooth.  I over extend the decking so I can trim it back nice and flush...controlling the contours

 

This sub-deck is needed to give the deck a solid base to be built upon...similarly to the sub planking laid down before the final layer of finished planking is laid.

 

I think I'm done for the day..I spent over 10 hours in the shop today...plus the deck needs to dry.....

 

Thanks for looking in.

 

Rob

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Edited by rwiederrich

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That's beyond impressive for one day's work...   When I first saw the pics before reading I was wondering if you'd changed your mind and were building an aircraft carrier.   :D  :D  :D    Sounds like you have a good plan for this.

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