Jump to content
rwiederrich

Great Republic by rwiederrich - four masted extreme clipper - 1853

Recommended Posts

Thanks Gentlemen.....I'm not the superb builder who adheres to the finest detail that many  here on these pages are capable of attaining , but I still try to simulate the best I can in the scale I'm working in.

 

Rob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 A Little bit of work today finishing up belaying the sheets and downhauls.   The buntlines and clews will be kept out of the way with gater clips.

I tend to add rope coils at the spider and fife rails when the lines are belayed.  All this work gets done under the shrouds and can be troublesome....so I did it now.

IMG_8228.JPG

IMG_8229.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, BANYAN said:

Very neat belaying Rob; looks good!

 

cheers

 

Pat

I utilized a similar method to Ed's...while creating the rolles off the model and then loop securing them to the pin with an extended end of the rope itself.  I will add another lighter rope coil.

 

Thanks Pat for the comment.

 

Rob

Edited by rwiederrich

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, mtaylor said:

Rob, looking good.  Keeping the lines sorted is a problem.  You might try threading a sewing needle to the line, the weight will drop it and keep it under tension.

Thanks for the suggestion Mark.  When I ran the lines while I was building the mast, I identified the lines by forward and aft and port/starboard.  This means all I needed to do was decipher through 3 or 4 lines...and those from twisting around one another.  I would belay a line then follow it back up and make sure it was totally clear. Occasionally I had to unbelay and unfoul the line...but that didn't happen often and wasn't an issue.

All the lines that remain will go through fairleads then down to belay pins on the rail.

Just making sure I have all the padeyes secured on the mast and nothing is forgotten.

 

Again...thanks for the fine suggestion and your comments.

 

Rob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It might cause some to wonder, so I wanted to clear the air on the subject.

 

Why do I use different colored line?

The downhauls are larger diameter line and so I chose to model new and older used line... to keep things different.

It was not uncommon to see different shades of line...as the older line contrast against the newer.

 

Here is an example so no one thinks I've lost my mind.

 

Rob

01215102.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Imagining the enormity of line on a clipper, one would also need to imagine that lines wear out....get replaced.  And so it  seamed logical to attempt to replicate this fact.  It was actually one of the easiest to replicate........the hard part was having the epiphany.

 

Rob

Edited by rwiederrich

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rob, In regards to the sailmaking process,what would be most helpful to me is to know the type of paper you find best,and what you use to mark the seams . If it proves convenient,next time you make a sail could you post a picture of all the components laid out ready for assembly. I can take it from there.              Thanks for your reply.          Gary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be more then happy....Until, I can provide images....I use simple copy paper.....any printer paper you may have.

 

Take a metal 12" ruler and draw the panel lines of the scale you are making.  Panel lines are generally 24" wide.

 

Once the scale is determined...just fill the page with the lines.   Then do the back, making sure you draw over the opposite sides opposing panel line. I've tried pencil and black pens for this...I prefer black ball point pens.

 

Then make a photo copy of the *Master*  copying both sides.  You can increase or decrease the darkness of the copies to help mimic the elusion of the seam.  If the lines are too dark..they may appear un-natural...if too light, they may disappear after painting.

You decide the darkness.

 

Now you have a sheet of paper that has lines on both sides.

 

Measure, draw out and cut out your sail, making sure the head is on the edge of the paper with the panel lines doing up and down.

(One hint)  make the sail slightly taller then it would normally be..you need to compensate for the curl/billow you will induce into the paper and you want the sail to fit nicely. Once secured to the yard when you affix the sheets to the lower yard you will have ample sail to preserve the *Billow*.

 

Next, with a separate piece of copy paper cut strips for the bands(ie...footer, clue and reef)...then simply glue them in place on the sail...not worrying about the edges, because you will cut them off...even with the sail edges when they are dry.  I use white glue...it dries fast and is workable when still pliable(when rolling the sail).

 

More to follow.

 

Rob

 

 

Edited by rwiederrich

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once the edge bands are glued down..determine the location of the reef points and add them by any means you devise.  Personally I use a fine nylon flat paint brush and I cut the edge even and then cut out the length of simulated reef points.  Collect these for use on other sails. (Modelers note:)  Reef bands can be problematic if using string....trying to keep them straight and such. So I use nylon paint brush bristles.  Once cut into the desired length....there is no issue in picking up a single strand, dipping it into a drop of glue on an end and placing it on the reef band.  Glue dries clear, reef points are straight, even.....done!   Reef points are applied after the sail is painted.

 

I paint my sails AFTER I fix clew points to the sail edge and bottom..using fine twisted wire...secured beneath paper seam patches to hide and secure the clew bands, and AFTER billow forming.

I use simple canned spray paint in several colors to simulate the canvas color I want.  Paint both sides with even and numerous light coats till you achieve the desired color and opacity.  (Note);  Do not over spray...soaking the sail.  You want to achieve an opacity and an even coat...and you do not want to unevenly cover over the panel lines.  when you try it a couple of times you'll see what I mean.

 

To achieve the proper billow...I begin to form the sail head using a 1/4 dowel....rolling the sail around the dowel to form the billow(This can take some time and finesse.  You are actually rolling the dowel along the paper sail..this will cause the sail to billow.  The action is kinda like rolling a cigarette....but not.  If you hold the sail in the palm of your hand and with the other hand roll the 1/4" dowel over the sail(Again....this will take some practice). 

Once proper shape is achieved.......roll the foot edge by means of a metal ball cake decorating tool(Similar to the one I posted earlier).

Take your sail and lay it on a soft cloth and slowly and gently rub the edge with the tool(Back and forth....up and down..in small circles).....this will cause the edge to curl..forming the bottom edge of a billowed sail. (This too takes some practice....do so on a practice sail to gain experience.  (NOTE to modeler).  The ball forming tool used by cake decorators is used to form the edges of fondant edible flowers....it rolls the edge of flower peddles, creating realistic flowers.

It works on paper too, but care must be taken to not over stress the paper and create undesirable ripples.   Practice.

 

I suggest you try these techniques on a plain piece of paper to gain the experience needed before working on the real sail.

Adding buntlines is easily done by wetting the line in glue and gently pressing into desired place beginning from the bottom edge up to the top edge.  I hold the glued line in position then lay it down from bottom to top...avoiding any wrinkles and un-evenness.  (I lay the sail onto a rolled towel to support it and control the sails curve).  Makes application easier.

 

NOTE to modeler;  As the paint is drying, it tends to cause the sail to slightly curl....keep it on a flat surface with support(curled paper towel...you know).  When dry, you will need to easily reform the sail.  It really isn't a big deal, but I wanted to note it.

 

Good luck. 

 

Rob

Edited by rwiederrich

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the technique Rob, at some stage may be useful to collate these into a single document and put them on the database?  Sorry, not trying to create even more work for you, but this is an interesting technique worth preserving.

 

cheers

 

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, BANYAN said:

Thanks for the technique Rob, at some stage may be useful to collate these into a single document and put them on the database?  Sorry, not trying to create even more work for you, but this is an interesting technique worth preserving.

 

cheers

 

Pat

Thanks Pat.  I've always tried to adopt and develop  the easiest way (I think) of producing repetitive parts for my models that are reproducible, as reasonably scale accurate, using common inexpensive materials. 

With a little practice, anyone can make authentic looking sails for their models...without using lacquers, custom molds/forms....etc..

Being a lazy modeler, I'm always looking for anything that can produce the effects I'm looking for as fast as possible.  And since sailing ships are inherently *slow going*....I'm looking to shave off any time spent as I can.   I set the bar high for myself by building my hyper detailed 1/96 Cutty Sark rudder repair diorama in just over 3 months.  Mind you, it was only partially scratch built.

 

As recommended I will strive to put together a log for the database so my processes can be preserved for other modelers use.

Thanks for the fine comment and suggestion.

 

I'VE UPDATED THE SAIL MAKING PROCEDURE!

 

Rob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rob,  Thank you for sharing your sail making technique.I have gone back and looked at your pictures of your sails,and along with your descriptions I think I see what you do.,I gather that you have had no problem with the paper wanting to become discolored over time as some acidic papers are prone to do.Perhaps the paint reduces that tendency.I first contemplated using rag bond,but they only sold it by the ream at $35.00,and that put me off,not needing 500 sheets.I think the Morgan is a little too far along to do the sails,now that I think about it,but I have some other projects in mind where it will work just fine.   Thanks again for your help.  Gary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, GMO2 said:

Rob,  Thank you for sharing your sail making technique.I have gone back and looked at your pictures of your sails,and along with your descriptions I think I see what you do.,I gather that you have had no problem with the paper wanting to become discolored over time as some acidic papers are prone to do.Perhaps the paint reduces that tendency.I first contemplated using rag bond,but they only sold it by the ream at $35.00,and that put me off,not needing 500 sheets.I think the Morgan is a little too far along to do the sails,now that I think about it,but I have some other projects in mind where it will work just fine.   Thanks again for your help.  Gary

No problem..it was my complete enjoyment to be a help.  The painted paper has not discolored...but even if it did..it would become more like original sails then discolor through wear and use.

 

Rob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, popeye the sailor said:

you've made some really great progress Rob!   the rigging looks absolutely super :)   in awe and very impressed with your work ;) 

Thanks Popeye..very much.  I've been quite busy making (For my wife), a double(corner) mantle for the living room fire place with recessed lighting to illuminate the brick....so that has kept me away.  I hope to begin the shrouds very soon.

 

Rob

IMG_8245.JPG

Edited by rwiederrich
add image

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From this point.....I will rig the ratlines and add the fairleads.....run the remaining sail control rigging already rigged.

 

Once done, I'll complete the lower topsail and the main course and of course all their rigging.

 

I've not yet decided if I'll rig the backstays or wait until I finish up the main mast run the stays....then the backstays......????

 

All I know...is that I am nearly finished with the main portion of the foremast proper.

 

A new technique, I'm trying out....finish an entire mast, sails and all..before moving onto the next mast.......mmmmm...Oh boy.

 

Rob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The shrouds are looking good Rob.  I used that technique (complete all mast by mast) with my Endeavour and found it worked well - only i worked from aft to forward as I found it gave me better access for rigging some of the stays etc.

 

cheers

 

Pat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, BANYAN said:

The shrouds are looking good Rob.  I used that technique (complete all mast by mast) with my Endeavour and found it worked well - only i worked from aft to forward as I found it gave me better access for rigging some of the stays etc.

 

cheers

 

Pat

Pat...did you add sails as well?  I'm finding this method quite rewarding...since I don't have to work all the tedium on the model.  Just  some tedium.

Working on the bench were I can rotate the mast is wonderful.

 

 

Rob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed.  At this point I can both directions...forward to work on the head rigging and jib stays.....or aft and work on the main mast.

Techniques to reduce the tedium of repetitious work(like adding ratlines, or foot ropes/stirrups) are paying off.  I hope to knock out the ratlines in one sitting...so I can move to rig the lower top sail.

 

I'm pretty excited with this technique...first time I tried it.  Makes mast construction far more easier, when I can build it off the model, with access to all sides so easily.  The experience of having to flip this model around on the bench in my little shops requires moving lots of material and tools and it isn't any fun.

 

Rob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model shipcraft.

The Nautical Research Guild puts on ship modeling seminars, yearly conferences, and juried competitions. We publish books on ship modeling techniques as well as our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, whose pages are full of articles by master ship modelers who show you how they build those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you what details to build.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×