iiihmb

Brig Favoriten, J. A. Køhler & Co.

I have an ancestor that was Captain of the Brig Favoriten built 1848 at Kjerringholmen, Stavanger, Norway by Ploug & Sundt 

 

I'm new to modeling, working on the Pickle right now. Any ideas where I could find more in formation on this ship? 

 

would love to try building it. My only source of info is:http://www.norwayheritage.com/p_ship.asp?sh=favor 

Any help appreciate.

Herb Blair

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One might see if Ploug & Sund is still in existence in Stavanger. There might be drawings of her in the archives.

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Have you searched for any sister ships that might be helpful?

 

Richard

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Have you searched for any sister ships that might be helpful?

 

Richard

This is probably a dumb question but I have not idea how to search for sister ships.

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the ship yard is listed as 1848 at Kjerringholmen, Stavanger, Norway by Ploug & Sundt  Ifound it described as a small ship yard. No longer in business and that the Favoritten was the largesr ship it ever built.

So sister ships are unlikely.

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Hans Rasmussen ship captain Favoritten    

Hello, Thank you for the link! I had not come across it before. I recently found an article on the wreck of "Favoriten" in a book written for divers. While 11 men died (including Captain Rasmussen and his son, Rasmus), there were 6 survivors (including the Captain's wife and daughter, Serine, an officer and 3 mates). The officer told the story to the Stavanger newspaper and it is repeated in the article along with the following "description and history." From "Skibsforlis i Bergensleden Fra Bømlahuk til Holmengrå" by Erik Bakkevig, 2005, published in Haugesund. Any translation errors are mine. Description/History The brig was home based in Stavanger and was owned by the trading house, J. A. Kohler & Co. "Favoriten" was built of wood at the Kjerringholm shipyard in Stavanger in 1848 under the leadership of master shipbuilder, Peter Gjesdal. The ship's capacity was 187 kl, about 383 net registered tons. The ship was commissioned by the renowned merchant J. A. Kohler in Stavanger and was one of the city's largest. To the tune of "Sons of Norway" the ship slid into the water on March 17th 1848. The incident was something of an event in the city and is featured in the book "Stavanger Maritime History." Many onlookers had turned up both on land and in hundreds of small boats outside the yard. The ship was praised for its light and elegant construction and excellent sailing characteristics. It was said the company spared no expense. The ship's first master was captain J. S. Westergaard and the crew consisted of 13 men besides him. The ship's maiden voyage was to the Mediterranean bringing a load of salt on the return trip. In May 1849, the brig sailed from Stavanger to New York with 187 emigrants and also made a similar trip the next year with 225 passengers. In July 1852, the ship had an accident sailing from Stavanger to Stockholm with a load of herring. For an unknown reason she ran aground at Hå rocks and had to return to Stavanger with a large leak. Two years later, "Favoriten" was traveling from Stockholm to South America. The captain was H. Henriksen and on this trip he and 3 other crew members died of yellow fever. The master papers were then given to J. J. G. Kielland. Later masters were Peter Kaurin, A. Svendsen and Hans Rasmussen. "Favoriten" was a good long distance ship. She traveled to China, Australia, East India, North and South America as well as the Black Sea. She was their hometown pride and one of the most famous Stavanger ships in the mid 1800's. Carolyn

I found this source through https://www.sjohistorie.no/enwhich listed the captains of the Favoriten. My Great great grandfather was Henrik Henricksen. Searching other captains on Ancestry.com led me to the above relative of Captain Hans Rasmussen who kindly provided me with the above additional information. This is turning into more of a history lesson so please forgive me if it is considered inappropriate here. Waiting to hear from  The Norwegian Maritime Museum  for possible plans.

Herb Blair

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Herb

 

Looks like you've probably eliminated any "sisters".

 

But you're having some success with the genealogy searching, and I for one find your "history lessons" interesting so please keep us posted on your findings.

 

Richard

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Have discovered that the ship net tonnage was 381 with a draft of 13 feet and "deadweight of 189,5 coml" Don't know what that means. Anyone want to guesstimate the length based on those numbers?

Favoriten - 1851.jpg

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56 minutes ago, iiihmb said:

Have discovered that the ship net tonnage was 381 with a draft of 13 feet and "deadweight of 189,5 coml" Don't know what that means. Anyone want to guesstimate the length based on those numbers?

Favoriten - 1851.jpg

 

Unfortunately, would need at a minimum the beam to estimate the length, as tunnage (you list as net tonnage) was derived from the principal dimensions.  In general, the British method during the period (1848) is described in Murray, Andrew, and Augustin Francis B. Creuze. 1861. The Theory and Practice of Ship-Building. With Portions of the Treatise on Naval Architecture [from the Encyclopaedia Britannica] by A.F.B. Creuze. Steam-Ships by R. Murray. available from https://books.google.com/books?id=50ADAAAAQAAJ   on page 158.  Earlier methods used the beam (B) as the primary dimension, subtracting 3/5B from the length between perpendiculars to derive the length of keel for tonnage.  The depth in hold was then 1/2B.  Unfortunately, not really useful for determining the actual dimensions.  I am not sure what the Swedish methods of the time were, but they were probably quite different (note that in the late 18th century, Chapman offered a summary of the current method in Society for the improvement of naval architecture London. 1792. Some Account of the Institution, Plan, and Present State, of the Society for the Improvement of Naval Architecture: With the Premiums Offered by the Society, List of Members, and the Rules and Orders of the Society. To Which Are Annexed Some Papers on Subjects of Naval Architecture Received by the Committee. http://archive.org/details/someaccountinst00unkngoog. Starting on page 48.  One Swedish Common Last was roughly equivalent to 2 English Tons (see page 270 in

Stevens, Robert White. 1863. On the Stowage of Ships and Their Cargoes. 3rd ed. Рипол Классик. https://books.google.com/books?id=znwBAAAAQAAJ
Hope this helps a little bit!
 
 

 

 

 

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Wayne,

I hope this is something of a start to help you.

Here is a history link about the ship.

Sorry for the repetition, I tried to remove my posting without luck.

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