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Thanks Druxey; appreciate the feedback.  I think I will have to live the three (and a half) wraps now as i have permanently fitted the platform but I have noted that in my drawings and research notes.

 

It was a great loss losing John, I have a couple of his books and find them very useful.  I found his work on 'trick stopper' anchor release mechanisms in his ‘The Transition from Hemp to Chain Cable Innovations and Innovators’ especially useful.  

 

I think I will have another trawl of the net to see if I can find some additional works by him relating to steering arrangements.

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Thanks for the likes and comments guys.  

 

Thanks Michael, still debating with myself on how best to create and fit a canvas backing to the handrails.  My current thoughts are leading me towards using 'washed' linen drafting paper but I am also intending to use that to make the canvas rolls (rolled hammocks) so there would be little contract.  That said the two cloths (in real life) were probably similar.

 

cheers

 

Pat

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On 8/22/2018 at 10:03 AM, BANYAN said:

My current thoughts are leading me towards using 'washed' linen drafting paper

Can you still get that stuff? I used it for the sails of my Great Harry model way back in the 60's, but I thought it had vanished off the face of the earth.

 

I have to warn you, however, that my sails went all brown and brittle over the decades, but that may have been the mistreatment and neglect after I stuffed the part-demolished model in a cardboard box and left it for about 40 years. (I'd intended to fix it all up, but moved states, changed jobs and repeatedly changed address and got on with other things in life. I still intend to fix it up after the current build and I'll probably do a better job now than I would have then).

 

Steven

Edited by Louie da fly

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Thanks for the head's up Steven.  I can't say it is readily available these days but I have a little bit tucked away.  look forward to seeing the restoration of your Royal Harry.

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Hi all, another small update,  I am being slowed with research at the moment but finding a little time to do a few small things such as making the hammocks for stowing around the funnel as shown in the photo.  I posted a photo of the railings earlier; these are only 11mm high with the hammocks 22mm.

 

1090394053_HammockStowage.jpg.be56ce10c762a5b44efcba90d3914c62.jpg

 

I did these by rolling some washed drafting linen around a styrene rod (.8mm) then cutting them into lengths before attaching the marline hitch lashings.  The rolled linen was soaked with a diluted fabric glue (water) solution and I originally had intentions of removing the rod.  However, even with the stiffening from the solution it proved to keep these straight enough as shown in the photo so I left the rods in-situ.   I have just noted i need to tidy up some of the rod end (to hide them a bit better).

343138450_Hammocksunderconstruction.thumb.JPG.62d816c8543517366a721eeadf64a5c7.JPG1511245610_Hammocksbeinglashed.thumb.JPG.1c16517fcfc86909a57494261607fa36.JPG2134565539_HammocksCompleted.thumb.JPG.83caed3adb0069fd2bdbcdfcff32b1c2.JPG

 

I also did try to add the clews and ring that would have been folded inwards (as shown below) but simply could not achieve it with my clclumsy fingers at this scale 🙂  As these faced in towards the funnel they would not have been seen anyway (well that is my poor excuse.

 

1317484131_HammockLashedcrop.png.e6b5e91647b3ce0a0ef67b519a413b91.png

cheers

 

Pat

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Hi Pat,

They look like they will do the job anyhow Pat.

I was looking at how to roll a taper in the ends. Could you of cut the linen with a triangle each side, then when rolled(with tri's at either side)  would of been thin on the ends ?

 

 

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Thanks for the comments and ideas guys; much appreciated.

 

Carl, thanks - I am reasonably happy with them but practice will make better :)

 

Dave,  I had thought of that but once I decided to avoid the fold over I did not pursue the option.  I will certainly try that on the 1:48 versions.

 

Thanks Ed, only 22 this time as they were only shown stowed around the funnel.  the crew allowance was for 140, but by the time you take out the senior sailors and officers etc it would have been closer to 100 crew.  I have yet to establish their purpose there (except that is a great place to air and dry them over the stoke hole ventilation above the boilers.  The only other purpose I can think of is some form of protection for the Captain and conning officer in battle?

 

cheers

 

Pat

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I was going to ask these questions too. It seems like an unusual place to store the hammocks, as it would be difficult to cover them in foul weather. Or were they put there only to dry ?  But why then rolled ?

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These are good questions Eberhard, and I really don't know for sure; but, I think these were only stowed here/used in action or for ceremonial.  Attached is the picture (crop) I used as reference.  The photo was taken in late 1867 when the ship was the escort for the visit of Prince Alfred, and is shown dressed overall.

2126704611_HammockStowage.jpg.5fd8a37885242a97c3ee2e5eff35bc99.jpg

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Pat,

Are those actually around the mast? Just seems strange but then <shrugs>.   Since it was for a dignitary, might they have put there to keep exploring fingers away from the stack?

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At least the level of evidence on her is quite high, when I compare this with the navies of my home-country of the same period - usually we only have some pictures taken from the distance, if any at all, and virtually no plans 😥

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Hi Mark; definitely not around the masts which are clear in the full photograph. I think this was done more often than not as the permanency of that rail with canvas around the stack suggest?   The whole arrangement sits atop the stoke hole ventilator and coaling/access hatches so it would need to be a determined individual to touch the 'hot' stack :)

 

The few photos I havre do provide some nice detail Eberhard, but I would really appreciate finding a photo providing details of the forecastle and midhips sections of the upper deck :)

 

cheers

 

Pat

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Thanks OC, things have slowed a little lately while I do more research and produce some parts (and a road trip of 10 days departing Monday coming) :)  Hope to do some work on my Vampire on return also.

 

cheers

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