Silkjc

Working Faster and More Efficiently

40 posts in this topic

Take two (your choice) steps back from your model, you will be amazed at how grand it looks. Looking at your build through a macro lens will, for most of us, show little mistakes that only the master builders may avoid.  One thing I have learned from MSW is not to be afraid to redo a part or section. I find it gratifying to find a mistake and make it right, part of the challenge.  

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Seeing what others have done, And how you can do it to look better than there's, Is a learning curve. You never stop learning with this hobby.

Being dissatisfied with your work rate or quality all the time can make you dislike of the hobby.

So try your best, be happy with results and enjoy. :)

donrobinson, EJ_L, mtaylor and 2 others like this

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My great-grandfather was a cabinetmaker. His rule for tools in the workshop was simple. When finished with the tool- "Don't put it down, put it back in its proper place." After many years spent looking for the pin hammer (as an example) I now follow his dictum.

EJ_L, Canute, donrobinson and 2 others like this

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My great-grandfather was a cabinetmaker. His rule for tools in the workshop was simple. When finished with the tool- "Don't put it down, put it back in its proper place." After many years spent looking for the pin hammer (as an example) I now follow his dictum.

G'day Kishmul

That's a very wise grandfather, we should listen to him, but as I, I'm still looking for my 'pin hammer'.

Maybe I start a new 'leaf' this year. Just maybe....

Havagooday

Greg

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G'day Gemma

I see that you had a visit from the Gremlins. They are a constant visitor to our place. Taking things and returning them weeks latter!

Haveagreatone

Greg

GemmaJF likes this

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i believe that our work habits reflect our personalities and our life experiences. Therefore, what works for someone doesn't work for someone else. There are modelers on this forum that produce meticulous detailed drawings and then "build to print." I believe that this is the ideal way to build a model and the quality of their work reflects this. I am emotionally unable to work this way. After making a lines drawing, I am anxious to get busy! I produce the best work in small blocks of time. If working in a large time block (over an hour), and if I produce a part that is not up to snuff, I am likely to figure that it is really not bad so I'll use it anyhow. If I dry fit it and then come back later, I am more likely to make it right.

 

For my current longboat build, I got to the place where I could install a temporary thwart, and a little stick figure, only to find that his feet dangled a foot or so above the footwalling. After going through the usual rationalization that no one would know the difference, etc. I decided to find a plausible solution. I researched the various alternatives (could they have rowed standing up? Are the thwarts too high or should the footwalling be raised?). The only sensible answer was that the boat had been fitted with stretchers, and I added the longitudinal strikers to support them.

 

My model building does not proceed in a straight line, and is certainly not fast or efficient, but it comes out ok in the end. I therefore, think that everyone has to find the pace and work habits that best suits their personality.

 

Roger

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