Moxis

Rigging of a 6 pounder French cannon of the 17th century

My build of Le Cerf is nearing the phase when I have to start rigging the ship's cannons. There are 16 pcs 6 pounders and 2 pcs 8 pounders on the deck, but unfortunately the plans lack completely their rigging. Because of this I wonder if any of you might give me a link or tutorial to show how these are rigged in the correct way.

thibaultron and mtaylor like this

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You have to rig your cannons as in this photo to the reserve of only one tackle in the back.

 

The dimensions of the elements are as follows (guns of 6 / guns of 8), real dimensions to scale for your model

- single and double block: 175mm/200 mm

- rope of tackle: diameter: 17mm/20 mm

- breeching: diameter : 32mm/47 mm

 

art3.jpg

 

GD

roach101761, BANYAN, Moxis and 10 others like this

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I have never before seen a breeching rope that goes through the gun carriage rather than round the cascabel.  How common was this?  The wear rate must have been terrific.

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Very common on the French ships.  I'm not sure why but that seems to be the way they did it.

Eddie, davyboy and thibaultron like this

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I too am surprised about the breaching rope.   What is the purpose of the cascabel if not to secure the breaching rope.  I do not think that it can add to the strength of the barrel.  Does anyone know?

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I presume the cascabel was there as the same/similar cannons were used by the army and fortifications?  Then again... dont-know.gif.a4de48c86c41b45fdd9321b485755d2d.gif

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Balance, good handhold, also a good place to lash rigging to while moving or securing the gun and Uncle Carly tied his teeth to them while sleeping, being a good fiddle player, allowances were made for him.

jud 

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Hello,

 

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and probably before, in France, the cannons were all rigged in this way. The breeching passes through the gun carriage.

The through holes are worked accordingly by rounding the edges.

 

GD

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Thank you, Georges.  I am a great fan of ANCRE and your group, so I am sure that you are correct.  I'm just surprised that I had never seen this before.  

Entirely my own fault - I have had a copy of "The 74 Gun Ship" since soon after it was published, and there it is - clearly shown in Fig.197 - but I had never noticed its significance. 

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