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captainbob

SS Mariefred by captainbob - 1:96

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On 27.3.2017 at 8:12 PM, captainbob said:

Hi all, I finally got a little more done.  The deck is planked, the front and rear walls to the main cabin are up and I finished the little deck house, which was the smoking lounge, it was removed when that deck was enclosed. 

 Bob

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Hi Bob,

great progress on the aft deck house....

 

Nils

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23 minutes ago, popeye the sailor said:

top looks like what you would see in older sailing ships  {I forget what they call it}.

looks like is would function as a drip edge to direct water away from the glass.

 

Look great so far Bob .

 

Michael

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Indeed rigols - I've seen them made in a few logs on the forums on shipmodelinfo, where they make mostly modern boats, maybe you can find ideas there? Etching or casting would maybe work?

 

Here is another view: Mariefred alongside quay in Mariefred

I see darker pixels indicating carvings or reliefs inside them, but not more than that - how large would these things be on your model?

 

 

Edit: I found a picture where you can see some detail, taken after the fire in 1980 before rebuild (you can search digitalmuseum.se for hundreds of old pics by the way):

https://digitaltmuseum.se/011015402462/fo124957dia/media?i=291&aq=owner%3A"S-SMM"+text%3A"mariefred"

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Thanks, Matle.  Those are the best pictures so far, but it's still hard to know exactly what is there.  Is that a flower in the middle and a straight line to either side of it?

 

Bob

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Hi All,

I have to move away from research for a while to build a little more.  Or I will know everything there is to know about the Mariefred and never build her.  The Mariefred is a very early (1903) steel boat.  So like Nils (Mirabell61), I had to plate her, rivets and all.  Maybe I shouldn’t say so but it was a lot easier that I thought it would be.  The main problem is finding the right foil for the job.  Most of what I found at the hardware store was too thin and doesn’t look right.  There were four or five brands where us non-professionals find what we want.  But walking down to the end of the store where the contractors go, I found the heaver foil that is needed.  I found an old clock gear that I made into a ponce wheel and with just a little practice . . . here’s the results.   I’ll accept it as a first try.  Now paint and on to the rest of the boat.

 

Bob

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Bob,

 

What about the aluminum foil sold in groceries stores? There is a variety which is very thick, while still being soft enough to accommodate all shapes and curves.

Once glued to the wooden hull, it could have been perhaps easier to install.

Anyway, you did a fantastic job and your rivets are just perfect and very realistic of the era.

 

Yves

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Hello Captain Bob

 

You sure are doing an excellent job on your little steam ship the SS Mariefred. The after little housing sure dose look great, your hull plating is amazing, such a great idea that you have come up with for your platting and also for your riveting, WELL DONE,                                                                          ENJOY.

 

Regards   Lawrence 

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Hey Bob

 

Just catching up .....Woweee, she looks fantastic, what with rivets and plating, etc, etc.  Almost too good to paint, in fact (although, paint you must, of course).

 

Mighty fine work.

 

Cheers

 

Patrick

 

 

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Yes, the tape is self sticking with a waxed paper backing.  As for the plating, there was two was it was done.  One was to start at the keel and lay the above panel overlapping the one below.  The other method was to lay every other row of plating (1-3-5-7), then go back and lay the other rows (2-4-6) overlapping both the row below and above.  According to the plans the Mariefred was plated by the second method.

 

Bob

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Hello Captain Bob

 

Just checking in on your great build, Your After House is stunning and it looks so very real if not for the small size, well done. I just love your little guys they sure look like they are keeping you in line and they do also brighten up the Old Ship Yard with a smile,                                                                        ENJOY.

 

Regards   Lawrence

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Calling Captain Bob. Calling Captain Bob!

 

Hi Bob.  I've become a bit concerned that you haven't been posting for quite a while. I've sent you a PM a while back, to check to see if you were ok, but I've not had any response so far.

 

I hope all's well with you and your Admiral and that you're able to rejoin MSW soon.

 

All the best!

 

Patrick

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