Johnnymike

Has anyone else felt like this

I have been working along on the Prins Willem by Corel for some time now. I have completed the hull and just finished the ratlines.

Now I am starting the standing rigging. I have done an adiquate build job but the other day I took a close look and realized that just building

this ship so far has improved my skill level tremendously. So I decided to go back and redo or rework some things. As I started I saw more and more

areas I could improve and it got to the point that I wished I could start over again. I still have a ways to go to finish the ship but I don't know if I want to.

I can continue on to the finish, go back and spend a lot of time and effort on rework or put it aside and start a new project.

 

Am I nuts or do others experience this also.

 

JMS

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I would start another project. Leave that one aside until you start cannibalizing it for other projects, or you really, really, have nothing else to do. Obviously, there's the issue of money so that must factor but I'd rather start another project. 

 

Cheers, 

 

Rick

 

Omega1234, mtaylor and Nirvana like this

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I agree that you should take a break from it, but remember your guests who see the finished model in your home with a nice finish,  neatly done, and a smooth hull that shines, will never see the imperfections or comment on them if they do so long as YOU don't point them out.

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JMS,

 

Been there, done that...   The way I see it, two choices... finish and continue learning from your mistakes, or stop, toss it, and start over or another model.  Your choice.  Personally, I'd finish it at this point.  Skills are built up on steps and finishing is a step.

 

Disclaimer:  I tossed the first version of my scratch build due to un-recoverable errors that would have stopped me dead later on.   If I could have recovered (and today, I think I could) I would have.  

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it's inescapable.......unless you feel you've followed the best solution,  you will always feel that way.   are you certain that your simply not getting bored with it?  that would be the more logical reason why you'd want to start another kit.  then it would be best to shelve it,  until you feel like tackling it.  but if your looking to improve on the work you've already done,  as long as the desire and interest is still there,  by all means.......stop where you are and back it up a few steps.  improve where you feel it needs it.  I'm not sure if your new at this hobby or not.......but the advice I give is to finish the model and don't make the changes.   build a couple more and then look at the 'first' model.   you'll see right away where you've improved,  and what you still need to work on.

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JMS you are not nuts...these are long projects and it takes time to develop the needed skills. I'm stuck on my Cutty Stark for a number of reasons. So I went back to my HMS Fly which I put to the side several years back and now feel I have developed enough to complete her after working on several smaller projects and putting my self through what I call practice runs of various different skills needed but off the model. It's nice to know if you come up against new on a kit, you may have practice it off the kit.
Hope this makes some sense.

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I started the MS Constitution in '04. For various reasons (including some damage) I have suspended the build.  I always think I want to go back and complete it but I don't really want to take it apart/fix the issues.  I may eventually just use the newly learned skills to improve the rest of the build and leave the "original problems" alone.  As Jim said above, anyone who sees it in person isn't going to see the problems unless you point them out.

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You are not nuts, We all get this. We hit a problem and realise that, if we had done things differently earlier, the problem would not have arisen. Carry on, it is part of the learning curve. Complete the project, you will uncover more errors and learn from them. Chucking it out means you lose the investment AND the opportunity to learn more. My first effort (AL Scottish Maid) was an abomination, but I knew that. Second (AL Dallas) slightly better, third (AL Harvey) slightly better, fourth (AL San Juan Nepomunceno) passable to the untrained eye but not mine- from a novice who would have proclaimed "0h. how lovely" I  had become a critic "ratlines are over scale". And so it goes. That you will never satisfy your own critical eye is inevitable- next time I will do better is the impetus that drives us. I will never, ever, produce a flawless model but, having completed the last- screwing up along the way- I am 100% confident that the next will be better.

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JMS,

    Well, you MIGHT be nuts.  Look who you are hanging out with.  :cheers:

 

    ...but, as others have said, been there-done that.  That is one reason why I recommend starting out with a kit you won't mind trashing.  Most people learn ALOT during the build of their first model.  I think of it as the training wheels model.  You will continue to have the same problem with each follow-on model, but I don't think to the same degree.

 

    Normally I would say, continue to build until you think you have reached a reasonable level of experience.  Don't be afraid to pull off pieces or planking and re-do it.  Rubbing alcohol is your friend (so is 12 year old scotch).  At some point, move on, but keep that model as your test model.  When you get to a new skill, try it out on your test model.  If you screw up figure out what you did wrong and do it right on your display model.

 

    ...normally.  This looks to be a pretty pricey model.  Perhaps turning into a lab experiment is not the best answer.  In that case, start a  new project with a simpler model and get the kinks worked out.  Come back later and work the bugs out of the Prince.

 

    ...and be sure to start a build log.

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To be critical of one's work is good - to a point. If it results in reinventing the wheel over and over, you'll give up the hobby. But if you finish the project (that alone is something to be proud of!), then say "The next one will be better", that's a healthy attitude. At least, it's worked for me over the years.

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Thank you all for your comments.

I have read them all carefully and I have to say I can not disagree with any of them.

I think the old adage "cant see the forest for the trees" applies to me here. I started to get so entangled in the details

I was missing the solution. It is so true what you all said and I could hardly believe how it exactly matched my experience.

 

"ratlines are over scale"  

Rubbing alcohol is your friend (so is 12 year old scotch)

"The next one will be better"  I am 100% confident that the next will be better

I would start another project.

will never see the imperfections or comment on them if they do so long as YOU don't point them out.  

If I could have recovered (and today, I think I could) I would have.  

are you certain that your simply not getting bored with it?  that would be the more logical reason why you'd want to start another kit  

I have developed enough to complete her after working on several smaller projects and putting my self through what I call practice runs 

always think I want to go back and complete it but I don't really want to take it apart/fix the issues. 

 

All of the above completely describes my conundrum to a 'tee".

 

I am going to put aside the Willem for now. After all the hull is complete and in my eyes it is a handsome model as is.

I have the Batavia by Kolderstok ready to start. And I am confident I can do a top notch build.

 

Thanks to all

 

JMS

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I have been working for over 15 years (on and - mostly - off) on Prins Willem. I know your feeling: it was my first large three masted ship (probably my last also: no space for more)

From my experience: don't continue when you're not motivated and try to keep the reworks to the bare minimum (you will never get back to the start, and there is a lot you can't redo - at least in mine :) ). But on the other hand: she has so much more to show when the rigging is on! (and yes, I did remove my ratlines a couple of times, as the result didn't quite meet my standard. But I did not go back to redo the shrouds (which are not correct), nor did I go back to redo the gunports and the wales..... Kind of balance: what is reasonable to redo, and what is not.

 

And please.... start a log on that Batavia as soon as you start! (and put in a small pic of Willem somewhere in a corner)

 

Jan

 

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I have been in the same boat.

 

When you embark on a large and time consuming project you will have frustrations. I have been working on my constitution for quite a while now. As time progressed my skills seemed to increase, which is a good thing. However when I look back I wish I would have done things better and differently. Instead of scrapping the build I decided to go forward and finish the build. Instead of pointing out my lack of skills at the time, I decided to point out what I learned as the time progressed. Kind of like a 5 year learning curve. When I am finished I will have "MY" model of the Constitution. right or wrong it will be mine. When I did my rigging of the cannons, I used some of the kit supplied rigging material. I then bought a Jim Byrnes ropewalk and am making all the rest of the rigging line myself. Instead of tearing out the cannon rigging I left it show the difference from the kit rigging to my new skill of of rope making. It still looks good but I know next time I can do better. If you want to see how I am progressing check out my build log.

 

I see you are in the Chicago area. If you aren't aware there are three great ship modeling clubs around Chicago. Feel free to check them out.

 

Happy modeling

 

 

 

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Jan

Thanks for the comment it means a lot to me.  I have followed your build of the Willem for a long time. Even before you lost your first vine.

Watching your work progress makes my work seemed second rate. VOC ships seem to be my passion but

I don't have anywhere the knowledge or skill you and others have and it is kind of discouraging some time. 

 

I don't feel it would really be of any ones interest to see one of my builds especially after following Danny on modelbouwforum.nl. 

 

Thanks for the incite however and please keep posting as I will continue to follow yours.

 

JMS

 

 

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Each boat is a learning experience.  And each boat I build is better than the ones before.  If not I'm not learning or improving.  But those looking at my boats, who are not modelers, never see the mistakes.   So finish every boat you start and learn from it to do better.

 

Bob

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That's some of the best advice I've seen: 'the next one will be better'.

Sometimes you can 'cover your tracks' with later work, or manage to leave a pile of rope around it.  In any event, learn from it and move on.  Just remember the rules for spirits.  (With apologies to Farley Mowatt.)

1. If a bottle is left on the table it must be opened, to let the air at it to let the demons out.

2. A bottle once opened must never be re-corked, so it won't go bad.

3. The bottle must be drunk at once, before the goodness goes out of it.

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JMS

 

Feel exactly the same. But I would make two points.

You will continually improve, so all projects will reach a point where you might ask this question.

So finish the current project as it is and be proud of your work, then apply new found skills to the next project.

Secondly I imagine, like 99% of the members here, the audience for your finished project won't be knowledgeable Judges but family and friends.

And I'm sure they will see it for the fine body of work it is.  and not see or understand the things you think could be better.

In fact I bet if you pointed subjects out to people then they will tell you that they would never spot that or realise it was not perfect.

 

I say keep up the good work and enjoy the learning experience.

 

Nick

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There should be a name for this syndrome. "If I knew it was gonna turn out this good, I would have done a better job" or " If I knew I was gonna live this long ,I would have taken better care of myself" or " If I knew it was gonna tur out this good I would have used better materials" That last happens a lot when I experiment with something. I think I would finish the project as is and move on with your experience in mind on the next project.

Jack12477, Canute, Nirvana and 1 other like this

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Your not alone. I sometimes think about pulling my rattlesnake apart and redoing lots of it. All mainly because I see things that I have the knowledge and skills to do it properly now. 

zoly99sask, mtaylor, Nirvana and 1 other like this

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JMS,

Yes, you are nuts spending time with us here at MSW.....:P

As for taking a break from the build and focus on another, I would definite say YES.

Stated by others, each ship/boat/yacht is a learning process.

I support you to work on another ship!

mtaylor, aviaamator and Canute like this

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