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Admiralty Models will be offering a brand new workshop directly following the Nautical Research Guild annual meeting in October, 2017,  Tampa Bay, Florida. It will take place in the same hotel venue,

October 29 -30, and we will be able to offer the same room rates. A brief description follows:

 

Have you been put off modeling an 18th century ship by the complexity of the headwork? Then this workshop is for you! Learn the hows and whys of expansion drawing parts such as the main rail. Actually assemble a mock-up of headwork and make patterns for the head timbers. Two days of theoretical and practical work with David Antscherl and Greg Herbert of Admiralty Models

 

 

 

Required tools will be minimal.  We will be supplying a laser cut knee of the head and headrails. Participants will have a simple homework assignment to do prior to the workshop but this shouldn’t take more than an hour or so. We will be incorporating multimedia to better appreciate the demonstrations presented. Oh, and we will be working in 1:36 scale to make it easier for the 99% of us who can no longer work without magnification.

 

 

Cost of the two day workshop will be $275. If interested please let me know so I can reserve a space for you. Please do not send a deposit at this time! Many details still need to be worked out. If you would like to attend please send an e-mail directly to me at dvm27@comcast.net.

 

albert, trippwj, druxey and 5 others like this

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Posted (edited)

For our workshop directly following the NRG Tampa Bay meeting we are providing the materials depicted in the photo below. You will build the miniature mockup of the ships head prior to the workshop and we will learn to loft all the various rails from the sheer plan. After constructing our version we can then compare it to the laser cut "proved" version. Should be lots of fun and we can accommodate a couple more participants. If you are interested please e-mail me at dvm27@comcast.net.

 

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Edited by dvm27

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Homework to produce the model headwork seen above will take more than an hour for most, but is a rewarding experience in itself. The scale is 1:32 (3/8" = 1' 0"). Full instructions accompany the kit.

mtaylor, donrobinson and davec like this

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Just to be clear, this workshop is not part of the NRG meeting. We dovetailed it onto the end because we thought it might be convenient for those already attending the NRG meeting. Registration is separate and must go through Admiralty Models (dvm27@comcast.net).

mtaylor, donrobinson and davec like this

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Looking forward to this (especially after the headworks headaches I had with "Independence!).  See you all there!

dvm27, mtaylor and davec like this

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I know this is not really the goal of these workshops, but I wonder if there has ever been thought to selling parts and materials separate from the workshop, and perhaps materials that would allow someone not able to attend to get at least some of the benefit of the wonderful prep that goes into these.  I would so LOVE to be able to attend once of these but just don't see it happening anytime soon unfortunately.

dvm27, donrobinson, davec and 1 other like this

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As so much of our workshops are hands on instruction we just provide a rough outline to our participants, Jason. It would be very labor intensive for David to provide step by step instructions for our two day courses and he just tapers his instruction to fit the pace of each class. We once discussed digital courses to be provided through our website but logistically it was too difficult.

donrobinson, mtaylor, davec and 1 other like this

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Just received the "homework" and the instructions look easy enough to follow.  Looking forward to getting this done in the next few days.

druxey, davec and mtaylor like this

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Greg:  The first step in the instructions is to taper the knee of the head from the stem to the tip of the knee.  Since this piece will be glued to the backboard, the taper is on the outer, non-glued face of the knee, right?  Otherwise the piece won't glue down flat.

donrobinson, davec and MEDDO like this

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Not sure if it's appropriate to post here, but I didn't want to start a build log for this mini project, so I'll post my progress in this thread.  Admin:  I'll move this if you'd like!

 

I started with a scrap of baltic birch plywood, 1/4" sized to 5-1/2" X 5-1/2" as a back board.

 

I cleaned the laser char from all the parts and tapered the knee of the head from the stem to the knee.  I then glued the stem/knee piece and the interlocking piece to the backboard.

 

I then glued the support frames for the curved bow to the interlocking piece using the tabs and clamping them to small angle irons to ensure they are perpendicular to the interlocking piece. In reinforced the supports with some 1/4" X 1/4" stock.  Next is adding the 1/32" plywood that forms the "skin" of the curve of the bow.

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The 1/32" plywood that forms the "skin" of the curved bow was glued along it's base to the assembly.  When dry, the outer surface of the plywood was moistened with water which allowed it to bend in a curve against the three supports.  Two little yellow nails and some rubber bands hold it in place until the glue dries.

workshop4.JPG

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The upper cheek was fitted in place and scarfed to the hair bracket.  That assembly was sanded to final shape and glued in place.  The cheeks were then sanded so the faces are parallel and flush. I also finished the detail in the scroll work at the end of the bracket.

workshop6.JPG

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I decided to finish off the bow planking as Greg did, then installed the lower rail.  The main rail is finished.  Once it's mounted, the homework assignment is completed.

workshop7.JPG

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Finally getting started on my homework for the workshop....Got the knee of the head piece tapered and glued down to the backing board...Will get the bow former pieces glued in tonight, then give the assembly a rest overnight before attaching the bow skin tomorrow.

 

Between working on this homework and reading about these head pieces in several books from my library as my bedside reading this week, I believe I'm beginning to get a feel for the various pieces that make up the headwork on these 18th century ships....

 

Looking forward to the workshop so I can develop a full understanding...

 

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Today's progress.  I was amazed how strong the main rail was being made from three pieces to take best advantage of strength of the grain.  And thinning it down was quite easy with the miniature hand plane I've had in my tool box since the 80's.

 

All of this ship construction along the lines of prototype practice is new territory for me...must say I'm thoroughly enjoying the techniques and love the craftsmanship history lesson I'm getting along the way.

 

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druxey, mtaylor, oneslim and 5 others like this

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I'm impressed by everyone's work, and looking forward to the NRG meeting and workshop. I got some time in over the weekend, and have the upper and lower rails shaped and installed.  Hope there aren't any grades being given on the homework assignment - mine got caught up behind a bunch of other priorities, and it shows.  I did learn that I don't like cleaning laser char off of wood - I would go crazy building a laser cut kit.

 

Dave

 

 

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5 hours ago, davec said:

I did learn that I don't like cleaning laser char off of wood - I would go crazy building a laser cut kit.

 

Dave

 

 

It’s been so long I and forgotten how bad that is.  It’s making me rethink that stack of kits I have on the shelf.  

 

Dave, I am also hoping for the “no grade” thing😜

Edited by MEDDO
donrobinson, mtaylor, druxey and 1 other like this

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