David Rice

Alternative Line Material

I am fortunate enough to live in a Coastal Community where I can walk the docks, and look at different types of ships and small vessels. We also have a extensive Marine Retail Store dedicated to Commercial Fishing located on the Docks. Over the years, I have been buying Nylon Seine Line in various sizes for gardening and other projects. The smallest diameter Seine Line I am aware of is #5, which has a diameter somewhere between 050 and 070 in equivalent Kit lines. See examples below.

 

The Seine Line is stiffer and is much easier to use.  When cut, the Seine Line frays less at the cut end than the line provided in the Kits.  The #5 Seine Line (Nylon) comes in 1 lbs spools. Which is approximately 3,500 feet at a cost of only $12.99 each. This one spool will last me a lifetime.  So far I have only experimented with it. So far I am impressed.

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Nylon looks good to me but, I'm thinking about how well glue will soak into the line. It soaks in real well with cotton but I'm not too sure about this.

(White glue im meaning, Not CA)

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Tarred nylon sein twine is certainly the best string anyone could ever want! Memphis Net and Twine is the name of the company I get mine from, the brand in your photos is unfamiliar to me but looks identical. When you consider what hardwear stores now charge you for cotton string of indifferent quality and the limited diameters to chose from (two), spending a little more to get a much larger amount of higher quality string with a choice of many diameters makes perfect sense.

jud, donrobinson, mtaylor and 2 others like this

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1 hour ago, S.Coleman said:

Nylon looks good to me but, I'm thinking about how well glue will soak into the line. It soaks in real well with cotton but I'm not too sure about this.

(White glue im meaning, Not CA)

I glued two strands together. No knot.

Titebond II Glue

30 minutes drying time.

Very strong bond.

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I should mention here also that Tarred Nylon Sein Twine is literally what's holding most of today's tall ships together. It's the material most often used for every seizing or lashing on every traditionally rigged boat afloat. Every served eye, every end of every ratline, is made up or attached with this stuff.  Every sailor has a piece in their pockets at all times. If you see someone using a marlingspike or heaver aboard a ship, THIS is the material under the tool. It's the perfect material for the job. The very very light coating of tar is not enough to render it sticky and the smell is not apparent but it's just enough to make this stuff hold knots better than anything else.

here are some photos with the Memphis Net Catalog. I don't own every diameter but I'm showing from thickest to thinnest # 60 #36 #24 #18 and #9 , over the diagram on page7 of their 63 page catalog. Www.memphisnet.net

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23 minutes ago, JerseyCity Frankie said:

I should mention here also that Tarred Nylon Sein Twine is literally what's holding most of today's tall ships together. It's the material most often used for every seizing or lashing on every traditionally rigged boat afloat. Every served eye, every end of every ratline, is made up or attached with this stuff.  Every sailor has a piece in their pockets at all times. If you see someone using a marlingspike or heaver aboard a ship, THIS is the material under the tool. It's the perfect material for the job. The very very light coating of tar is not enough to render it sticky and the smell is not apparent but it's just enough to make this stuff hold knots better than anything else.

here are some photos with the Memphis Net Catalog. I don't own every diameter but I'm showing from thickest to thinnest # 60 #36 #24 #18 and #9 , over the diagram on page7 of their 63 page catalog. Www.memphisnet.net

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I have been using the material for years. I have spools in multiple diameters. I only wish that it was available in a little smaller diameter. I emailed the Everson Line Company and asked them if they could provide some line smaller than their size #5.  I told them what I wanted to use it for, Model Ship Building.  It's been a couple of weeks, and I never received a reply. I have other uses for a smaller diameter line, like for stitching things together.

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This looks very promising, but unless you're building in 1/24 or 1/12 scale, only sizes 6 9 and 12 are likely to be useful.  Smaller diameters are needed.

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Stiffness and fraying example between  #5 Seine Line with equivalent diameter Kit Line 050.   

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I just purchased some.  The scale is right for stays and shrouds at the larger scales I prefer.

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1 minute ago, jbshan said:

Other than size, I would think you'd want to find a way to dull the white line a bit.

  I haven't tried it., but you might be able to dye the white.   So far I have only worked with the black.

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9 minutes ago, DocBlake said:

Just got my supply.  Enough to rig shrouds and stays for the rest of my life!

Me too.

 

That's the toughest line I have ever seen in my life.   What's really nice is that when you cut it, there is no fraying. 

 

I wish I could find a manufacturer that makes a smaller diameter.

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