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DORIS

HMS ROYAL KATHERINE 1664 by Doris - 1/55 - CARD

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Hello Doris, thanks for the new update, I have a question about how you handle such fine delicate parts and how you attach them to the model. After you have made the fine parts and they are "Baked" then I am assuming that then you paint them.  But after that then you show us them on a new sheet and then on the model. Can you share some information about the way you handle these last two steps?

 

And I forgot to say that the work in simply amazing.

 

Michael 

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4 minutes ago, michael mott said:

Hello Doris, thanks for the new update, I have a question about how you handle such fine delicate parts and how you attach them to the model. After you have made the fine parts and they are "Baked" then I am assuming that then you paint them.  But after that then you show us them on a new sheet and then on the model. Can you share some information about the way you handle these last two steps?

 

And I forgot to say that the work in simply amazing.

 

Michael 

Hello Michael,
no problem, I will bring detailed report and tutorial from the work with these fine pieces of decoration as soon as possible. I  believe, it could be interesting.

And thank you for your kind words.

Best regards,
Doris

 

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Hello Doris,

 

As ever, Katherine is a dazzling display of ornamental wizardry; a true feast for the eyes!

 

I notice your tree-nailing pattern alternates every other frame.  This is something that Dan Pariser had researched for his Queen Ann’s Revenge build, and a pattern that I adopted for my build.  I wasn’t sure whether it was necessarily correct for Soleil Royal in 1689, but In the absence of more concrete information, I went with it because I like it.

 

Do you have other more specific information about this nailing pattern?  Whether it is specifically English, or more broadly in use throughout Europe?

 

Just curious.

Edited by Hubac's Historian

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Hello dear friends, 
I do appreciate your kind words and comments a lot. Thank you all very much. 

2 hours ago, Hubac's Historian said:

Hello Doris,

 

......

I notice your tree-nailing pattern alternates every other frame.  This is something that Dan Pariser had researched for his Queen Ann’s Revenge build, and a pattern that I adopted for my build.  I wasn’t sure whether it was necessarily correct for Soleil Royal in 1689, but In the absence of more concrete information, I went with it because I like it.

 

Do you have other more specific information about this nailing pattern?  Whether it is specifically English, or more broadly in use throughout Europe?

 

Just curious.

Well, I followed the museum models from that period and information from the books. First, I made much less treenails, but then I added them in the right amount on all ribs as advised by my advisor and top expert Kpt.KL, who describes this theme very well on the Czech forum. Maybe it will help you, here are some links:

 

https://www.modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=177&t=107202&start=90#p2162392

https://www.modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=177&t=110763&start=630#p2159976

https://www.modelforum.cz/viewtopic.php?f=177&t=110763&start=630#p2160401

 

2 hours ago, Dziadeczek said:

Un-freaking-believable!!! Hats off!!!

Could you tell us what book is in the pics, placed in front of your model?

I use these books:

Goodwin, Peter: The Construction and Fitting of the Sailing Man of War 1650-1850. 

Lavery, Brian: The Arming and Fitting of English Ships of War 1600-1815. 

 
Lees, James: The Masting and Rigging of English Ships of War, 1625-1860.

Endsor, Richard: The Restoration Warship: The Design, Construction and Career of a Third Rate of Charles II's Navy. 

Endsor, Richard: The Warship Anne: An illustrated history. 

Deane, Anthony and Lavery, Brian: Deane's "Doctrine of Naval Architecture 1670. 

Peters, Andrew: Ship Decoration 1630-1780.

Anderson, R.C.: The Rigging of Ships in the Days of the Spritsail Topmast 1600-1720.
 
books.thumb.jpg.92da001a303e17e56d067490c4863cf3.jpg
2 hours ago, rwiederrich said:

How in the world do you make those reliefs?

 

Rob

 

1 hour ago, druxey said:

Superb, as always, Doris. But how do you not get breakage of those fine relief details?

It is not easy to describe my technology in words, so I will ask my husband to take a short video tutorial. I'll give the video here for you all.ūüėé

 

Best regards

 
Edited by DORIS

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Hubac's Historian : You are welcome.

Albert:  Thank you very much, I am pleased you like my work.

 

As I promised, I am bringing a tutorial how I make those fine pieces of decoration. Unfortunately, the video was unreadable - the decorations are so tiny that the camera cannot focus on them. So I could take only detailed pictures from the process. I gently roll thin tubes with a finger on the paper background,

1.thumb.jpg.164aa84ee922238cbebc46a8f8e38450.jpg

mainly use peaked tweezers and fine brush to shape the modeling clay (I have already written here about the kind of clay I use  = in our country is called modurit/modelit, it is a polymer hardened by heat). 

2.thumb.jpg.f4dee027ed350f479c889cc8286799b7.jpg3.thumb.jpg.3ee86e23e08ddf3d2cf03a8f5dba250c.jpg4.thumb.jpg.d77adc210e530c5b980236078f6c65b3.jpg5.thumb.jpg.026b601552c86f4006f53b750cd22e9a.jpg6.thumb.jpg.51a487f1e0abd700ebdce0128bd20d45.jpg7.thumb.jpg.660f6cbbabf9ab8e3ee0192f890d1697.jpg8.thumb.jpg.e0d6e43efa73ac82bd1b7257cadff61b.jpg

I shape this mass on the wax paper, it is very important for easy separating pieces of decoration after baking from the background.

 

10.thumb.jpg.37004b7e74359af89da31e7b27cf9cfb.jpg11.thumb.jpg.e98d2159d1b83fa0045296a740c68a71.jpg

 

 

 

 

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After baking the mass hardens but remains slightly flexible. I carefully separate each piece of decoration with a small sheet of paper or using a thin blade, but it is often quite easy to separate decoration only by bending the wax paper.

 

12.thumb.jpg.39dbc252fe8c0b70634e4d77978d26f5.jpg13.thumb.jpg.7cbff632832ee9f3ea1b618a22c0277e.jpg14.thumb.jpg.474ec77ccd74ea99586c4576c2500cd2.jpg15.thumb.jpg.f5fa3fbb7dea617c5dc13d174b44be63.jpg16.thumb.jpg.538aff07a976a0b6b67869beba55d2b9.jpg17.thumb.jpg.c535baf8b71e52c7127f39be6e6f7e60.jpg18.thumb.jpg.a7283f2f171482b2ad66f4674bfa686a.jpg19.thumb.jpg.796838b29831c6f7a8a2401f979d0c1b.jpg20.thumb.jpg.4a1002ba5d15200fc1f6343bd06252fc.jpg21.thumb.jpg.d7ae85e3346e87fcd65b641522deeaee.jpg

 

 

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Before gilding I always try to attach each piece of decoration on the model to check whether it suits well:

22.thumb.jpg.a314ef2963953cd590305067ccc16d07.jpg23.thumb.jpg.a65b971038612a02674a19d01d1f6218.jpg24.thumb.jpg.e0b3a6e4ea5c4fcf850608e7e80c69fb.jpg

Gilding the decoration  - I use golden acrylic paint:

 

25.thumb.jpg.35f64c03178e2511998509629712d5df.jpg26.thumb.jpg.6067696c2a7872ff58eb78b89b311356.jpg27.thumb.jpg.7206bfc683e0081760baa65df210e46a.jpg28.thumb.jpg.bb4aaf0f0db7768ecafdaa69311efc81.jpg29.thumb.jpg.bd921a93ec8625a7c845bad130568f6e.jpg30.thumb.jpg.ae5464d1d4ea3dc9f8eef65bcba08c77.jpg31.thumb.jpg.3207a2563d35ffe4518546ae60aa860c.jpg

 

After gilding I relocate the ornaments to clean paper, where the paint dries. Soon I will bring other pics from the process, where you can see the final work.

 

Excuse my unsightly hands,  they are sore from hard work I did last days.

 

Best regards

 

Edited by DORIS

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Thank you, Doris. Obviously those thin pieces are not brittle after baking, which explains why they do not break. Your ability to model such fine detail is amazing. I appreciate you sharing your talents with us.

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Dear friends,
I am glad you like my tutorial and it is useful for you. Thank you for your comments and kind words. After drying I started to place decoration on model, it is attached with little amount of glue - I use medium dense Super glue (industrial quality).

 

Here si the result, decoration on port is almost finished, the pics are in a higher quality, so enjoy them and have a great time:

1.thumb.jpg.785df6a59e9abdde40fec30321fb15c2.jpg2.thumb.jpg.89ca4414b6297bc872d94b6910a3aa22.jpg3.thumb.jpg.4c13eb78a669adf03ca37fd9077f7f72.jpg4.thumb.jpg.550e6f681a1a16e439a23e19ac247564.jpg7.thumb.jpg.f7097eac4f95c58047f23a7fe5b6aee7.jpg8.thumb.jpg.c2bb9f25b16373d6f970ade2ed4ba436.jpg

9.thumb.jpg.eda75328ed3cf2e4d28a76f7bc7ce778.jpg14.thumb.jpg.fa44022ddf82d2a7531e54d7dcbab72b.jpg

 

Kind regards,

Doris

Edited by DORIS

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I am awed at your work Doris.   This may have been asked before, so apologies if this is a repeat question.  Do you have any problems with the wax paper melting in the oven?   I did little reading on this subject and have seen recommendations to use parchment paper in place of wax paper.  

 

Thank you for sharing your work with us.

 

 

Allan

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