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Hi Folks

I have in mind a knotty problem. I am building Lynx by Panart. The model requires the building of the gun'ls and then removing the supports in order to accommodate the false deck. This is my first build and I am at a loss as to how to bend the false deck to fit taking into account both sheer and camber. Fortunately there is no tunblehome.

Do any of you wonderful people have any tips on how to do this?

Thanking you all in anticipation

 

Wishing you all a fair wind and following seas

Don

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Hi again folks

I omitted to mention that the bulwarks are 1 1/2  - 2 cm high and have to be gotten over in some way to clamp the deck down

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Is this 'false deck' in one piece and of plywood?

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HI Druxey

Yes and it has no slots for the upper "top timber" bulwarks supports which the instructions say must be removed. Hence the false deck sits on the curved deck supports and runs right up to the waterway. The problem seems to me to be how to clamp the false deck to the curved supports whilst the glue cures and sets the camber and the sheer. i hope I'm making sense

Many thanks

591dd4145004a_Bulwarksupports.thumb.jpg.9237e07556fa640fd58d922e763bbfdf.jpg

mtaylor likes this

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Ah, I see your issue. Probably the best solution might be as follows: Dry fit the false deck and mark across the middle of the bulkheads. Drill holes through the deck for small brass panel pins or similar. Soak the false deck for several minutes in warm water. (Don't leave it too long, or it may delaminate!) Apply a glue such as Bondfast to the tops of the bulkheads, then lay the the deck in place. Pin down starting along the midline and working progressively towards the edges. The small pins or nails will hold the deck in place and shape while the glue sets up.

 

Good luck with the job. Let us know how it works out!

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Hi Druxey

Many thanks for the tip

\i was hoping to plank the deck before fitting, but I guess I'll have to forego that luxury

 

Best wishes

Don

 

 

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38 minutes ago, Rat-Fink-A-Booboo said:

Hi Druxey

Many thanks for the tip

\i was hoping to plank the deck before fitting, but I guess I'll have to forego that luxury

 

Best wishes

Don

 

 

NO!!!! Do not plank the false deck first.  Wait until the false deck, whether you use one piece or several, is securely in place BEFORE you plank. 

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If you use hitch chucks with the pins - more force on the hold down is possible

and that makes for a stronger bond.

 

A hitch chuck is a small piece of scrap wood that you drill a hole thru and

have between the head of the pin and the wood that you are clamping. 

The pin can be tapped and bend getting more force.  The chock can be

split off if necessary to grip the pin to remove it.  I mostly use a a curved

Kelly clamp ( hemostat ) to remove the pins.  Resting on a piece of planking,

the curved clamp makes a good prise

druxey, mtaylor, Jaxboat and 1 other like this

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Don,

 

Have you thought of forgoing the plywood false deck altogether and just plank the deck as it is done on other models and the real vessel?  You may have to use planks that are a bit thicker to account for the thickness of the plywood.   

 

Allan

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Hi Druxey, Jaager, Allan, Jaxboat

 

Woah!

Thanks everybody - slammed on the anchors just in time by the sound of things :)

 

I'd love to plank directly onto the deck supports, but I don't trust them to be accurate. I figured that the false deck would find its own 'true' curves if fixed amidships.

The pinning and nailing sounds like the best option - the planking will have to wait and the scarfing and nibbing will just be a bit more fiddly around the waterways.

 

As always wishing you all fair winds and a following sea.

druxey, mtaylor and Ryland Craze like this

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Don,

 

I think the bigger problem is what you had in your first post - how to bend plywood in two directions.  Plywood only likes to bend in one direction.   I think one-piece decks only work for short decks, not where the deck runs the entire length. I see two options:

  1. Rip the false deck in to narrow strips, perhaps about 10 mm wide. You'll lose some material, ending up with gaps and there will be a bit of a kink at the joints, but that can be sanded down and covered by the final planking.  You could also add filler strips. This has the added benefit that you don't have to fit the whole deck at once, and you can get some clamps under the deck beams.   With a little bit of planning, you can make the first strip near the rail fit between the "ribs".
  2. Make some kerf-cuts on the underside of the false deck.  This may give it enough flexibility to bend in two directions. However, I don't have much hope for this idea.

Option 1, seems best to me:  it will allow you to fair the height of the deck beams as you go, if needed.  

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With all due respect to lehmann, many years ago I used the method I described on a model for my daughter. It worked fine. Of course, if the ply is too thick, it's another matter, but I don't think kit maker supply wood any thicker than they need to!

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Another armchair experiment ( denken experimenten ) :

The area to be covered by a plywood sub-deck is not accurately represented by a 2D Waterline plan. There is a depth dimension that increases the area to be covered.

Thought: using thick paper, the precise area could be had by using it to cover the area.  Then,  why not thin hard poster board.  It is flexible, yet stiff.

THEN:  Why not try using the poster board as the actual sub-deck?  Once in place, give it a coat of thinned PVA and let it dry.  This will compensate for the too far apart

mold supports and the PVA should stiffen up the poster board.  Then a veneer of Hard Maple in planks can be laid.  The veneer can be cut using a steel edge and sharp

edged tool.  No saw would be needed.

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Hi USS frolick

Its the title of a 1966 film that is so unbelievably bad that it's  quite good/funny.

It should have been called Rat Pfink AND Boo Boo but a typo got onto the posters and the film maker couldn't afford to put it right - the idea still makes me giggle. Oh, just bye the bye, Rat Pfink is a superhero - I'm sure you get the picture :-)

 

wishing everyone fair winds and a following sea

Don

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