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Chuck

HMS Winchelsea - 1764 - Scratch by Chuck (1/4" scale) - version two

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Good to hear.  

My fondest memories.... working with you along with Rusty on Syren and Confederacy.

I see the Winchelsea as having the same or even greater potential as the Confederacy.

 

Dave

 

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A quick test dry fit of the bulkheads.  So far so good.  The stem and keel parts have been added to the bulkhead former.  The bulkhead former is now 3 sections vs. two on my previous Winnie.  You can see me pre-bending the rabbet strip.

 

bulkheadformer.jpg

 

rabbetstrip.jpg

 

stemon.jpg

 

 

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Amazing Chuck!  I understand you were discouraged a couple of months ago. Are you still planing on making the Winchelsea a semi scratch kit any kind of kit?   Or a practition or anything like that? 

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Its going to be just like the Cheerful project.  But the plans will NOT be sold separately.  The plans will only be included in the starter package which has the bulkheads.  There will also be no bulkhead templates on the plans.  There is no reason to include them since you get them laser cut.  This is being done to make it very difficult to pirate.  As of right now there will no longer be a book published.  This will just be released the same as I did for Cheerful with a downloadable free monograph and you can buy the starter package in Cherry or in this ????? wood if it works out.  So far I am liking how this wood looks and works.  But we shall see how you guys respond to it here.  Mike and Rusty will be building her in Cherry while I use the experimental wood.  Either way....if the wood doesnt work out...I will still finish this project using it and just offer another economical wood choice.  In addition to the starter package there will be a large number of mini kits for various other details...like a quarter gallery mini-kit....casting set...ships wheel mini kit, etc.  You buy what you want or make them from scratch instead.  That is the plan.  I am actually cutting a set of parts for Mike as wee speak....and one for rusty as soon as my wood order arrives.

 

ETA on starter package being released.....as soon as I get the hull planked up.

 

Chuck

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42 minutes ago, Chuck said:

Its going to be just like the Cheerful project.  But the plans will NOT be sold separately.  The plans will only be included in the starter package which has the bulkheads.  There will also be no bulkhead templates on the plans.  There is no reason to include them since you get them laser cut.  This is being done to make it very difficult to pirate.  As of right now there will no longer be a book published.  This will just be released the same as I did for Cheerful with a downloadable free monograph and you can buy the starter package in Cherry or in this ????? wood if it works out.  So far I am liking how this wood looks and works.  But we shall see how you guys respond to it here.  Mike and Rusty will be building her in Cherry while I use the experimental wood.  Either way....if the wood doesnt work out...I will still finish this project using it and just offer another economical wood choice.  In addition to the starter package there will be a large number of mini kits for various other details...like a quarter gallery mini-kit....casting set...ships wheel mini kit, etc.  You buy what you want or make them from scratch instead.  That is the plan.  I am actually cutting a set of parts for Mike as wee speak....and one for rusty as soon as my wood order arrives.

 

ETA on starter package being released.....as soon as I get the hull planked up.

 

Chuck

That is very wise with the plans and no bulkhead templates. 

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FYI...The reason for the alternative woods is two-fold.  First to make these projects affordable and Boxwood and pear are very expensive.   In addition,  I am not sure you guys are aware of this yet, but you will be soon.  The price for C.Boxwood has increased 75-100% over the last two-three months.   There are very few places in the US right now where you can get really nice stuff without grain that is creamy and wonderful.   At least not in the large sizes that I need.  The current costs for this stuff is now $40 and up per BF.   I was getting it for almost half that price six months ago.  Just got what is probably my last shipment of awesome looking boxwood this morning at that price before I have to either raise my prices or start thinking about a different wood overall.  When your wood guys run out of their pile....they will be very shocked to learn about the increase.  And will probably pass that on to you.  So my advice....if you use boxwood a lot,  buy all you can over the next few months from where ever you can find it.

 

You are looking at really nice boxwood boards that are 3+" thick, 5-5 1/2" wide and 30" long.   If you knew how much this stack of wood cost you wouldnt believe it.  I am looking to buy another batch within the next few weeks to try and hoard it at the lower prices where ever I can find it.  Gilmer now charges the lowest at $40 per BF.  Other sources have garbage boxwood or its even more money with boards half the thickness and width.

 

This is also the reason guys why my block inventory has been in bad shape.  I was waiting on this nice stack of wood.  Once I find time to mill it up I will get right on restocking the sizes of blocks I am out of.

 

boxwood.jpg

 

Chuck

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Nope.  Dont try and figure it out....you will never guess.  Just let me know as I progress if you like how it looks on the model....or not.  And consider that it is literally 75% cheaper than boxwood or swiss pear.  Knowing that,  is it a worthwhile solution based on how it looks on my model.  I need feedback as this is a very very important decision I need to make for my business.  The the type of wood isnt important at this time.  I probably wouldnt even acknowledge at this point if you guessed correctly as I am unsure about making such a big decision yet.  Its feedback from you guys that will have a big impact on that decision.

 

Chuck

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Ah well, my other guesses would have been Tupelo Gum or Hickory, but I respect your decision to keep that to yourself for now. I do like the look of it, whatever it is, and interested to see how the model develops, for me if the aesthetics, workability, and cost hold up then no problem with the timber selection.

 

Gary

Edited by Morgan

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Compare this to Chuck's stash.  :)

That's me next to the basswood supply at Mantua's ship model plant in Montava - SE of Milan - I think this was in 1994 or 1995 when our Pacific Tall Ships operation in Manila was buying direct from Mantua.  The stacks are 8 ft pieces of 4 x 4 and 4 x 6 basswood.  The pile extended about 30 feet to the camera's right.  They had more stored outside in open air covered sheds waiting to be brought inside for further drying.

I often wondered how long this stock would keep our members supplied with basswood and just how much was invested in the stock.

Kurt 

 

PTS - MANTUA015.jpg

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That is a big pile of wood.  My small pile probably cost the same as that stack;)

 

Anyway....here is a photo of just the bulkhead former.  I added the simulated bolts through the scarf joints (simulated).  I realize they would have been copper but I dont like the look of that raw metal so I went with black bolts.  Actually black mono-filament.  This should give you guys a good look at what the wood looks like under the light of my workbench, and its color and texture....how you can keep a clean edge even though it is not at all a hard wood like boxwood or pau marfim or yellowheart or lemonwood....which it is not.

 

That is a white marble tile 2 feet long that the piece is on.  It has a real flat surface and I use it when a flat surface is required, like assembling the bulkhead former sections.    bulkheadformerbolts1.jpg

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I agree, the new wood looks really nice. It sure is fun watching a kit being developed. Thanks for letting us look on.

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Chuck, I wonder if it would help keep your intellectual property safer if you supplied a password with the kit to have access to the instructions. Can you specify that you will not sell to certain countries? 

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Probably Al

 

I can do that if need be.  But the instructions wont be much help for a pirate.  They need the plans and templates.  The wood is not going to get blotchy.  It is pretty good.  It gets a little darker on the extreme end grain but it doesnt look bad at all.

 

Chuck

 

 

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2 hours ago, Chuck said:

That is a big pile of wood.  My small pile probably cost the same as that stack;)

 

Anyway....here is a photo of just the bulkhead former.  I added the simulated bolts through the scarf joints (simulated).  I realize they would have been copper but I dont like the look of that raw metal so I went with black bolts.  Actually black mono-filament.  This should give you guys a good look at what the wood looks like under the light of my workbench, and its color and texture....how you can keep a clean edge even though it is not at all a hard wood like boxwood or pau marfim or yellowheart or lemonwood....which it is not.

 

That is a white marble tile 2 feet long that the piece is on.  It has a real flat surface and I use it when a flat surface is required, like assembling the bulkhead former sections.    bulkheadformerbolts1.jpg

I have a flat piece of marble that I have glued on a 320 grit piece of sandpaper that I for sanding things flat. Works great. 

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Hi Chuck, just providing some feedback for you, as I think I will not have the time to add this to my build list :(

 

From a colour perspective the wood looks great; however, the grain pattern (not the grain itself) appears quite distinct.  When cut as you have done it, this seems to enhance the wood piece.

 

One of the other main drivers would be how well it cuts in your laser cutter; but, knowing how well it holds an edge and mills would be useful determinants in your final decision also.  From what I can see on screen, it seems to hold a nice sharp edge?

 

cheers

 

Pat  

 

Edited by BANYAN

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Its 1/48 scale.  After much deliberation and the desire to build a true 1/4" scale frigate before I drop,  this model will now satisfy that urge.  I was no longer going to look at the many beautiful 1/4" scale build logs on this site with mouth open in jealousy.  I have always been curious why there are no 1/4" scale frigate kits available as well.  I know there are plenty who want to build at this scale and now there will finally be one available.  Its not that large actually at about 3 feet long.  I can do so much more at this scale from a design standpoint too!!!

 

Mike and I have been discussing it along with some design changes and we just decided to build it together in this scale.  I believe everyone should attempt to build at least one frigate like this in 1:48 scale in their lifetime if they can.  And I believe most serious model builders dream of of doing so like me, so I am going to help all of them make up their minds by making it very accessible and hopefully painless to build. 

 

Chuck

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Hello Chuck, that are phantastik news. I am very curious about the new model you are developing. By the way, I recently bought a very old book. "The life of Admiral Viscount Exmouth" by Edward Osler, published in London, 1835. It has a full chapter about Edward Pellew, sailing around Newfoundland in the year 1786, being captain of Hms Winchelsea. It includes the description of crewmembers and life onboard. A description of a severe gale, and a Man over board accident is also reported. You might know this, if not, I can scan and send it. There should not be any problems with copyright after 184 years I presume. I find it always interesting,  knowing some things about the life on the ships we build as models.

Matthias Beckman

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