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Snow   

Hi , im putting a couple of extras on my amati adventure 1st ship , my ship is 1/ 60 scale so how high in mm is a say a 6 foot person

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It's totally worth your time to make a custome scale ruler for your model. One that shows ten foot intervals with five foot demarcations between. I find using these on my model makes a LOT of issues clear and puts the size of the ship and all it's components into a litteral perspective. 

To make one you need the scale that is often printed on the plans themselves but if your kit has none, you have to extrapolate using whichever dimensions the kit does give you. Sad is the ship model that won't give you Overall Length or Beam.

google "architects scale ruller" or "engineer scale ruller". Acquiring one of each of these will cost little but come in very handy as one of the many scales provided on one of the 12 surfaces these two tools give you will greatly simplify the problem of finding the proper gauge.

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Cathead   

A good ruler is indeed invaluable. But you can also use any of the multitude of online conversion calculators available. For example, go to http://www.onlineconversion.com/length_common.htm

 

and just enter 6 feet divided by mm, then divide that by 60. Pretty much every computer has a basic calculator you can do that last step on if you don't have a physical one.

 

Or you can use a spreadsheet like Excel, and if you don't have that, you can use the free versions offered by platforms like Google. For every one of my builds, I set up a basic spreadsheet that has a number of common conversions for that model's scale, and a few custom fields that let me enter a given number and have it spit out the corresponding scale measurement.

 

Maybe I should write up something about this with examples as a separate post.

Canute and donrobinson like this

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wefalck   

In the days of pocket calculators (now almost gone) and smart phones scale conversions shouldn't be an issue. Simply take your calculator and divide the prototype measure (ideally in the same units as you will be using in model construction, e.g. millimetres or inches) and divide this by the scale you are working in, say 1/60. In this case divide everything by 60.

 

If you are on inches and feet, unfortunately, the story is not so simple, unless you use 'thou(sands of an inch)' - converting into 1/16ths, 1/32nds, etc. needs one more calculation step. I agree, for those, who are not metric, a ruler might be simpler :o

donrobinson, mtaylor and Canute like this

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    The issue I have with this discussion so far is the use of a 6 foot person.  People were smaller 200 years ago than they are today.  I would shoot for a 5 foot person.

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Backer   

 

 

5 hours ago, Chuck Seiler said:

    The issue I have with this discussion so far is the use of a 6 foot person.  People were smaller 200 years ago than they are today.  I would shoot for a 5 foot person.

People were indeed smaller 200 a 500 years ago.

See the link to the Vasamuseum

https://www.vasamuseet.se/en/collections--research/skeletons


But, there were exceptions :

The average height of the crewmen is 167 cm, with the tallest 179 cm and the shortest only 160 cm. This is much shorter than today, which is a result of a poor diet as children. 

 

For my Golden Hind I use an length of 160 cm (about 5 foot)

hopefully this helps.

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