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Hi there:

 

I've just started experimenting with sketchup as a support for ship modelling. What I would like to do with it is to be able to make lines drawings and (if possible) templates for components - specifically frames. I don't know if all of this is possible - the lines drawing seems ok (once a bezier curve extension is acquired....

 

My question is if I want to print my drawings how can I do so in a particular modelling scale (1/4", e.g.)....I've seen no option for doing this so far and would be grateful if anyone could explain how this works - if it works....Thanks in advance!

hamilton

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Hi Per:

 

Thanks for the tip - I followed up on it and have ow generated some 1:12 scale line drawings of the Edwin Monk Curlew just to get a feel for the software. Not sure how successful I've been.....I'll need to print the plans to find out.....thanks again!

hamilton

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I'm a big fan of Sketchup. However it might prove cumbersome when it comes to ship design. I know it can be done but I have a feeling it's not the best tool for this. If you ask me, I find it unacceptable to NOT have a built in splines engine after all these years. The extensions you find are kind of old and, as I struggled with them a few time ago, buggy (unless they've fixed some issues in the meantime).

 

You don't need only the 2D tools to draft a plan. You also need surfacing smoothing possibilities, spline curvature analysis and so on. I'm using Sketchup for every project, but when I tried drafting a ship plan I went for something else.

Edited by moflea

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Yes, SketchUp has become very popular since it has a shallow learning curve.

It's used by wood craft designers. Commonly used in the movie/TV  business as well. 

I use the program for architecture design, together with the Podium for rendering. 

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I also tried Sketchup for drawing ship plans but found it lacking in many areas as was mentioned lack of splines and problems with circles, bevels and few other things. I have a post with my efforts somewhere on forum; at first it seems easy, feasible and I progressed up to a certain point and began to encounter difficulty do to a lack of tools. Im not new to 3D as I've been a Solidworks user for a long time.  I agree with Alex, I don't think Sketchup is well suited for drawing up plans. I've been recommending Onshape which is free for 3D modeling. It's a lot like SW so the learning curve was small. Search for a post called scantling questions. 

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It seems like Sketchup is really for square things, or at least really regular things. The number of CAD options out there - not to mention price issues and complexity - make selection a difficult task for the novice....I may try out Onshape as Don recommends - free is always welcome! I'm definitely not in a position to drop a lot of money on this sort of thing....thanks all for the contributions to the post so far!

hamilton

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For my ship CADing, I use DesignCAD, the 3D version. It is fairly cheap, and functions well. I draw out the frames in 2D, then switch to 3D to place them, then use the spline function to connect the dots.

 

Has a learning curve, but so do all the CAD programs.

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Thanks Ron - just looked into DesignCAD and was pretty amazed by the price....significantly cheaper than most CAD software and figured for a newbie it was worth a try.....we'll see how it goes.......thanks again

hamilton

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Hi Ron:

 

I've been test driving TurboCAD over the weekend and there is, indeed, a learning curve. I've been using Sketchup and so I'm having to both learn and unlearn at the same time! As an experiment I've started with a relatively simple example - the Monk "Curlew" centreboard sloop. I'm trying to model it in 1:12 scale and initially just determining how to set the scale was a challenge. Now I've reproduced (in 2D) the line drawings as well as a corrected transom and sketched the shape and taper of mast and boom. I have not made any attempts yet to experiment in 3D, but will work my way up there once I feel comfortable with 2D drawing - I'll read through the tutorial you link to above! 

hamilton

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How would one use Sketchup to lay out say a ship's helm. I'm picturing a classic 8 spoke with a bronze hub. The hub is round and has square holes around the perimeter. I understand making spokes round but how do you get a "hole" in the outer rim of the hub into which the spoke would fit?

mtaylor and thibaultron like this

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