Jump to content
mikiek

Thimble vs Bullseye

Recommended Posts

What's the difference? Both seem like wood donuts with a groove around the outside. Assuming there is a difference, when do you choose one over the other?

 

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think there may also be a difference in usage.  For example: thimbles are stropped into the eye of a block in order to take a hook.  A bullseye acts a sort of fairlead for rigging, or it can also be used like a heart.

 

Regards,

Mark P and mtaylor like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just wondering. My Niagara build shows a few thimbles reeved almost like a block for a couple of backstays.  Seems like a block would make more sense. Henry's comment about a bullseye as a fairlead shows up in the plans too. That makes more sense.

mtaylor likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the problem with using a block as a means of deflecting the angle of a stay down to the deck, or wherever, is that the pin for the sheve is taking the entire load and is the weak point that will break. The sheave doesn't need to be free to turn once the stay is set up so a thimble is a better solution: no moving parts and the entire fabric of the thimble is taking the load.

Derek C, mikiek, mtaylor and 1 other like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To me the difference of a thimble/heart and a bullseye is that the thimble/heart is meant to keep the eye in a rope/wire at a safe radius, when attached with a shackle or hook; it also protects the rope/wire from chafing, when there is a movement between the eye and the shackle/hook. To the contrary, a bullseye either serves as one part in a purchase or an arrangement to redirect the run of a rope, when there is no movement of the rope under normal circumstances. It appears that bullseyes were favoured over deadeyes when used in stays from the late 18th century on, though 'traditional' Dutch (merchant) vessels seem to have used deadeyes right to the end of the 19th century.

 

The explanation above concerning the advantage of a bulleyes over a block is certainly true for rope-rigging, while from the later part of the 19th a block with a metal casing seems to have been used in conjunction with wire-rigging.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have not Maury. And at 1:64 (my current build) it's beginning to get difficult to do much. In most cases, I just make sure that what is left of the fall is out of sight. In a few situations where the plans call for "belay to itself" I've frapped the end.

mtaylor likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×