Jump to content
Vegaskip

Ship paintings

Recommended Posts

 thought it was a little more like, "I'm not following you, you're LOST"!

 

Love seeing your work and your diverse subjects. Makes me always wonder what is going to be next.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been admiring your amazing work for months and am a painter myself. Some of your paintings remind me of the late Montaque Dawson's sailing ship pic's. How long does it take for you to paint one? Could you post some pictures of the process? A paint log as it were.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Canute said:

"Do you know where you are?" "Well, kinda"

I ALWAYS know where I am, I just don't always now how to get to where THERE is Ken!

 

On the other hand My wife is lucky if she can find her way across the street and back!:stunned:

 

Jim, do you have an average time it takes you to make and average painting? It seems like you are a little like Bob Ross, cranking out another beautiful rendition every day or two! Also I can't help but wonder what you use as inspiration for each painting. They seem to run the gamut from aircraft to ships, calm weather to storms, modern to ancient. 

Edited by lmagna

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's really amazing to see the development up from the conception sketch. Is the white on the sails, hull and foam still watercolor? I am guessing the sky/sea is a watercolor wet on wet blended technique. Thanks for the  demo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This painting and similar, I usually do in an afternoon, 2 to 4 hours. Size  A3 about 15” X 11” some times it will run over into the next day for an hour or so. I seldom do preliminary sketches , I usually know what I want and can build on it as I go. I am not a 'Water Colourist' I just use watercolour paints. White, I use gouache. I don’t know much about the technical stuff. Nor the fancy named paints. Mine are, light, medium and dark, I don’t mix up umpteen colours to get Black, I use Payne’s Grey or black if I have it. Mistakes, if bad I dump it and start againusualy different setting. Minor just wet and dab out.

hope it helps.

jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don’t know if I’ve posted this before.

A bit of American Heritage 
Ships of John Paul Jones's squadron pass the river Forth estuary. Later, they were involved in the battle of Flamburgh Head.
L to R Le Cerf , Pallas, Bonhomme Richard and Vengeance, September 1779
Jim

PS the ships are my own interpretation.

 

96D10507-2E90-4DD5-AE3E-8E6E53EA028F.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Display 

Here is the finished Dunkeld Cathedral and the Scottish Horse dicplay. Features the painting of the Lynx Helicopter over the Cathedral. Regiment Cap Badge. Army Air Corps flashes, regimental Tartan and Blazer badge.
And for those who missed the original post. The history of the SH.
The Scottish Horse was a Yeomanry regiment of the British Army's Territorial Army raised in 1900 for service in the Second Boer War. It saw heavy fighting in both the First World War, as the 13th Battalion, Black Watch, and in the Second World War, as part of the Royal Artillery. It amalgamated with the Fife and Forfar Yeomanry to form the Fife and Forfar Yeomanry/Scottish Horse in 1956. The regiment also became part of the Army Air Corps 655 Squadron. 6th Regiment AAC. Originally raised around the village of Dunkeld the regiment's colours and archives are kept at Dunkeld Cathedral. The painting was commissioned by one of the keepers of the archives, it shows a Lynx Helicopter of 655 Sqdn AAC flying near Dunkeld Cathedral. 

44C24D5F-CA9E-424D-8055-C6226B4DBCE4.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One seldom thinks about Hay, but within all industrial City's or Port's that become crowded populate centers, Hay is the fuel that kept the Draft Animals working. Without that hay the citizens would need to move back into a rural setting, industry at a large scale would have disappear, replaced by the local Black Smith, Millers, Harness Makers and a few others there to support the rural needs, there would have been few laborers because the majority would be working on small holdings to feed themselves and selling only in small units. Hay is what fed and supported early industry. Like your work, surprising how that work reveals History seldom considered, is that your unspoken intent or is it one heck of a good accident. Looking forward to your next offering.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jud said:

One seldom thinks about Hay, but within all industrial City's or Port's that become crowded populate centers, Hay is the fuel that kept the Draft Animals working. Without that hay the citizens would need to move back into a rural setting, industry at a large scale would have disappear, replaced by the local Black Smith, Millers, Harness Makers and a few others there to support the rural needs, there would have been few laborers because the majority would be working on small holdings to feed themselves and selling only in small units. Hay is what fed and supported early industry. Like your work, surprising how that work reveals History seldom considered, is that your unspoken intent or is it one heck of a good accident. Looking forward to your next offering.

 

 

The history part is intended. I also try to depict little known maritime events, and the humbler work a day vessels. You didn’t mention the end product of all that Hay. With several hundred thousand horses in London, it had to be moved. A lot of it went back to the farms it came from as fertilisers, not the most popular cargo!?

jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, michaelpsutton2 said:

If I understand correctly the concept behind the paintings is not some photograph? I am truly impressed. The paintings look like they have been agonized over for day. To be able to go from the mind to such a completely articulated vision!!

(Artist hat on) All of them are composed and executed well with good dynamic range, and they just feel lively and have good motion to them. I'd buy prints :)

 

Edited by vossiewulf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes it is a photograph that sparks an idea. Or something I read about and try to 'illustrate'it.

 The previous ones of low flying a/c were commissioned by an enthusiast who had seen the actual event.

 He supplied photos of the locations, I also 'google earthed' it. Using photos of a/c from the squadrons, and where practical inserting the side numbers, serials, etc. I would say, half the fun is the research. Well actually that’s wrong one third, the fun is the research. Another third, the painting. And the last the look on the 'commissioner's' face.(so far I’ve been lucky, they have liked them!) 

When I started the wreck, I knew I wanted a square rigger, a lifeboat and a Tug. I wasn’t sure about the composition so painted the 'setting' first.(see pic). After looking at it for a while, I put in the ship, then the lifeboat then finally the Tug. I thought about a Rocket Rescue Unit from the cliffs but decided not to. 

Jim

323AC2A8-71A9-433B-82CD-DAC0E8EBE433.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

About us

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research

SSL Secured

Your security is important for us so this Website is SSL-Secured

NRG Mailing Address

Nautical Research Guild
237 South Lincoln Street
Westmont IL, 60559-1917

About the NRG

If you enjoy building ship models that are historically accurate as well as beautiful, then The Nautical Research Guild (NRG) is just right for you.

The Guild is a non-profit educational organization whose mission is to provide support to our members in their efforts to raise the quality of their model shipcraft.

The Nautical Research Guild puts on ship modeling seminars, yearly conferences, and juried competitions. We publish books on ship modeling techniques as well as our world-renowned quarterly magazine, The Nautical Research Journal, whose pages are full of articles by master ship modelers who show you how they build those exquisite details on their models, and by maritime historians who show you what details to build.

Our Emblem

Modelshipworld - Advancing Ship Modeling through Research
×