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I have this at my disposal

 

20171118_155510_resized.thumb.jpg.de0e32d7b8bff422d99566ad899f3aee.jpg

 

Yet I tend to reach for my Samsung cell phone whenever I want to take pictures of my build to post.

 

I'm curious what other's use to document and photograph the status of the build.

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14 Mega pixel camera, the type that most people use. For real close up shots I shoot through one of the old style magnifying lamps with the circular flouresent bulbs. I have 3 of the 15 inch kitchen lamps over my workbench, about 2 foot above the surface.

 

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Here is my set up.  It's able to be set up at all times.  Makes it simple to walk from the work bench to the photo area and take any number of photos and go back to modeling.  It's an old Speedotron brown line studio strobe system (400 Watt seconds) with a large head inside the overhead soft box and smaller heads flanking the desk. 

 

As there isn't (to my knowledge) any sort of interface from my newer digital Canon DSLR to the Speedotron, I use an off camera flash to trigger a remote on the Speedotron power unit.  The high voltage of the Speedotron unit can fry the circuits on digital cameras w/o some sort of isolation. 

 

I get photos with very soft shadows using these lights with the diffusion material softening the light.

 

Kurt

 

 

STUDIO 8-11.jpg

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I read somewhere two years ago that the best selling camera in the world was an Iphone.  Not Nikon, not Canon but a cell phone. And now a days, they have just as good resolution as your best DSLR camera.  Plus you can now get add on lenses for your cell phone.

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Being a former techie and now a luddite... no IPhone for me.  :)  But yes, the phones are possibly even better than a camera for many things as the manufacturers add memory, improve the lenses and even tweak their software for consistency.  Some have excellent flashes built in.

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Gaetan:

Thanks for showing the difference so clearly.  An 18 megapixel phone camera's pixel size is so much smaller than the DSLR's 18 megapixel pixel size to fit the same number onto the sensors that it's clear by this chart which gives the better results.  I try to point out the difference in pixel and sensor size to people who insist that their cell phone is equal to my DSLR the relative size of the pixels. 

 

I might use my phone's camera to take a snapshot of the chart you posted for the next time the subject comes up.  I used the term snapshot as in my opinion that's what a cell phone camera is capable of.  That said, many are fully satisfied with the results from a phone camera.  I just wish they could actually focus on a specific point rather than just be used on auto focus because so many phone camera photos that are posted suffer from a lack of focus.

 

It's like all tools in our hobby - use what you have and what you can afford.  But like all tools know it's limits.

 

Kurt

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Kurt,  some of the small pocket size digital cameras (not phone cameras) have the ability to change the auto-focus from full frame to center-weighted to spot focus, as well as macro focus.  I have 2 Canon cameras with these feature.  Check your owners manual for the camera you have to see if it supports these focus features. It will help a lot with close-ups of models.

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Jack:

My Canon pocket camera has the focus options you mention and it's with me almost all the time in my vest or coat pocket.  I think I have used my iPhone camera 3 or 4 times - for snapshots when I din't have my small Canon.  I use my DSLR Canon 60D for all my model photography. 

 

My point in my previous post is that cameras allow selective focus while phone cameras do not (at least yet).

 

Kurt

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I use our basic Canon A33 digital camera. I don't have a cell phone despite being under 40. I try to take photos outdoors so I don't have to worry about lighting so much, as my workbench just has a normal desk lamp angled from the top. I do have a few foam boards with blue and white sides that I keep around for clean backdrops when I care to use them.

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I'll take a picture with my Samsung cell phone and then reduce the size to 10% of the original.  It's still good enough quality to post online.  The best part is, it's great for posting on line but the quality is poor enough for anyone who wants to copy and use it.

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I'm currently using a Nikon Coolpix B700.  I hardly ever use the cellphone or the Ipad to take photographs.  Telephones are for telephoning.  Ipads are for ... oh, I don't know, looking in on Facebook and making inappropriate grandad-type comments whenever I look at my younger family members' timelines.

When I bought the Nikon I ditched my other camera - a Pentax bridge camera.  I wish I'd kept it - significantly more versatile than the Nikon.

 

I do have a dslr.  A Pentax, with two lenses.   When I bought it I thought I was being clever and getting into serious photography.  Absolutely not - the bridge cameras are so much more versatile, quick and easy to use.  Worst of all, the Pentax dslr's are apparently anathema to all the dealers here in the UK - they won't even look at them as trade-ins for other camera equipment.

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On 19/11/2017 at 8:14 PM, kurtvd19 said:

Gaetan:

Thanks for showing the difference so clearly.  An 18 megapixel phone camera's pixel size is so much smaller than the DSLR's 18 megapixel pixel size to fit the same number onto the sensors that it's clear by this chart which gives the better results.  I try to point out the difference in pixel and sensor size to people who insist that their cell phone is equal to my DSLR the relative size of the pixels. 

 

I might use my phone's camera to take a snapshot of the chart you posted for the next time the subject comes up.  I used the term snapshot as in my opinion that's what a cell phone camera is capable of.  That said, many are fully satisfied with the results from a phone camera.  I just wish they could actually focus on a specific point rather than just be used on auto focus because so many phone camera photos that are posted suffer from a lack of focus.

 

It's like all tools in our hobby - use what you have and what you can afford.  But like all tools know it's limits.

 

Kurt

Kurt,

 

I find as long as I use trap focus and focus about a third of the way into a subject (if it is inclined front to back or at a diagnal) using my phone cam, this helps to  keep more of the subject in focus.

 

OC.

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Hi Popeye2sea,

 

Umbrella is use at 180 degrees from the photographic subject. Primarily as a reflector. Because of his hyperbola shape it does also amplify the light and it works better when the inside of the umbrella is white.

 

A diffuser on a flash is like in the last picture; flash + beauty dish + white fabric which acts as the diffuser so that you do not get a harsh light which does not complement the subject.

On the small camera flash as you can see in few pictures, ''the white fabric"" is replaced by a white plastic which is also called a diffuser.

donrobinson, Canute and mtaylor like this

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It looks to me that the piece of gear that provides the best cost/benefit ratio, and one that is often not used in model photography, is a simple blank background. A bed sheet works fine but I was lucky enough to find a roll gently used seamless backdrop paper in the trash one day. https://savageuniversal.com/products/seamless-paper/storm-gray-seamless-paper/?gclid=CjwKCAiAo9_QBRACEiwASknDwRiDmSgRO5En6ualwS1DDPJfBc61XnAY7MIqtsPh_Xa-iGVpW8nHRRoCXcsQAvD_BwE

 

 

 

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The Nov 2017 Model Railroad Hobbyist Magazine had an interesting article on using a phone for model picture taking. An advantage for MRR pictures, is that you can get the center of the lense much closer to the track, so the picture looks like you are taking one of a real train. Had a good discussion on software available to merge several shots taken at various focal lengths (Without moving camera) so that you get a completely focused picture through the full depth of the shot. The software can be used with any camera the you can change the depth of field on. The discusion was mostly about using an I-Phone, but with info on how to do the same with Android phones, and a regular SLR camera.

To get the back issue (presently the Dec is current) you will have to subscribe, but subscription is free, and they have been publishing for several years.

 

 http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/

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