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Bear

Your stockpile is every modeler's dream come true. Beautiful to behold.

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Hello Keith, you have an interesting looking white milling machine there at your mancave. Could you tell more about it?

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Impressive collection - looks like the inside of a modeling store.

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I think I have finally seen someone who has my Hoard of models beat. I stand in the corner with head bowed in reverence!

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That’s a bunch of models. It’s amazing what some older kits bring on auction sites. I once had a 1/12 scale formula I racer that was in the closet for years. I paid like $40 for it new. When I listed it the bidding went nuts and it sold for $254. The guy said it was a fantastic deal for him and he was thrilled to get it. I never expected that.

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My wife would kill me if I had that many models. I have one in the house that I haven't worked on in a bit (Revell's 1:96 Cutty Sark) and my son and step son have a couple between them. 

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Still doing occasional work on my wooden model, but want to save it for my retirement. 17 months to go.

I have started to build the Heller 1/100 HMS Victory plastic model.

A review of this kit will have to be a multi review.

Part 1 is for the kit itself.

I cannot fault the quality of the parts. The details are excellent. See the pictures below. The detail for the copper plating is very good. All the parts are very highly detailed with some excellent detail in the wood grain on the hull and the decks. Even the cannon port doors have the wood grain and hinge detail on them. The kit has over 2000 parts so will build into a very detailed model. There is very little flash on any of the sprues. The two halves of hull went together perfect. Dry fitting the decks has seen them all fit perfect. So I would have no problem giving the kit 10 out of 10 for the parts.

 

Part 2 is for the instructions and rigging details.

This is where the kit lets itself down. To say the instructions are bad is an understatement, they are the worst I have ever come across. The pictures below show some of the instructions for rigging the bow sprite. For what Heller call the deck terminations and the single page instruction for literally the entire build. Instead of spreading these steps over a few pages everything is crammed onto this one page. The instructions for the rigging are impossible to understand. The numbers used and instruction for attaching and lengths is tiny Even with a good magnifier it is hard to read them. The only plus side is that instructions for the build are given in written form so it is at lest possible to put the kit together following the numbered steps even if there are hundreds of steps to follow. The steps to build the kit are very random as well, so you have to read and reread and decide on a plan of building.  This makes the kit a difficult choice for a first time modeller.

So easy enough to follow the written instructions, but no chance of understanding the instructions for the rigging. With that in mind I have invested in the plans for the Amati Victory witch will at least let me see the rigging plans properly. So I would give this part of the kit 3 out of ten. And it only gets that because I can follow the written instructions.  

 

Part 3 is for the whole kit.

Summing up ,faultless in the kits plastic parts with superb detail, massively let down with very bad instructions. Not very good colour schemes either. Heller recommend sunflower yellow rather then yellow ochre. So i would give the kit 7 out of ten overall. 

 

As you will see I have decided on the yellow and black livery. I just can't bring myself to paint her pink and light grey as the historians now say she was. I have not read lots of books on Victory or Nelson, but those i have read seem to suggest that nelson had the ships painted in the now famous yellow and black chequer board effect to distinguish friend from foe. All the artists pictures show her painted yellow and black. I have not seen any pictures of her painted pink. Does this mean all the art galleries are going to have to repaint all the pictures of Victory.? My opinion on this is that the pink and light grey colours that where found where not her finished colour but may have been used as undercoats. Pink would make a good undercoat for yellow and grey for black.

 

It would of course go a long way to explaining how the French and Spanish fleets were defeated . seeing the English fleet coming over the horizon and not knowing what to expect to see coming out of the mist. Then suddenly  into view come a fleet of pink ships. I would imagine most of the sailors would be rolling around on the decks in laughter by which time they would be done for. Of course that may have been Nelson's cunning plan all along with his pink fleet. But I am still not going to paint HMS Victory in anything other than yellow and black.

Paul

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