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flying_dutchman2

Eight Sided Drainage Mill scale 1:15 (Achtkante Poldermolen)

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Posted (edited)

220px-Schiedam_molen_De_Vrijheid.jpg.76563c97e651187bea5c9e3def82ada8.jpg

And for those wondering WHY schiedam has the highest (at least old, because the new turbine thingies are much higher) mills, that is because Schiedam is a city with lots of houses. Mills need steady wind, an no turbulence due to surrounding buildings (or even trees). So that leads to rather high (and completely stone-built) mills. 

Schiedam mills are not classic water or flour mills, but used for the production of Sjors' favorite drink :)

 

Jan

 

 

 

Edited by amateur

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Yes Marcus,

 

The real Schiedamse Jonge Jenever from Nolet 😃

 I live just acrosse the Walvisch en almost next to the Driekoornbloemen.

De Walvisch mills corn for flower and the Driekoornbloemen corn for Jenever.

In the early days thay are calling schiedam Zwart Nazareth because of the alcohol smell of all the jenever brewery’s . 

The pictures that Jan posted, in front the Walvisch and in the back the Driekoornbloemen.

And when you take a close look you will see a third mill, that must be de Tweeling (the twin)

 

Sjors

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Finished all the drilling of the holes and fitted then in the axle head. Looks good. Instead of being 90 degrees on all four of the vane tubes it is 91 degrees and 89 degrees. Per instructions this can be adjusted by shaving some wood off at the lower ends. 

 

I squared it over and over again, still not exactly. I guess the best thing to do is to use a newly purchased drill press and then get it exact. I am assuming all drill presses have some play after much usr. Oh well. 

Marcus 

Achtkantige pdrmln, askop, axle .jpg

Achtkantige pdrmln, axle drilled .jpg

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Worked on preparation of getting all the pieces together that make the vanes. The hardwood stock was 9mm by 2mm which I cut to 5mm by 2mm (the table saw comes in very handy) . The plans call for different widths but I kept it all the same. 1mm here and there isn't going to matter and while laying it all out on the plans it doesn't look clunky or too wide. 

Cut a little less than 13 meters (39 feet) of wood. 

 

1398960543_Achtkantigepldrmlnlatjeszagen.thumb.jpg.921a73a083f7f8d1e3325ea8c3d242c4.jpg

675503554_Achtkantigepldrmlnallpcs_cut.thumb.jpg.a7918bbfb855f6c0032fdfb5e319d332.jpg

 

The following have some Dutch words which I have no translation or it sounds rather weird. 

 

After reading the instructions over and over, I figured out how the vanes are put together. (either my Dutch is not what it used to be or the instructions are not very good). 

1968448922_Achtkantigepldrmlntemplateforvanes.thumb.jpg.5739c77fc09470cdb485ba161664fb86.jpg

After the template (pieces #90, 91 & 92) are put together, one has to nail de roedebalk (Rod bar) on top of piece #92 of the template. (I made a hole for a screw). 

 

Than you lay the heklatten (no English), which are the horizontal pieces, on the roede and follow the angle of the curve on piece #91 of the template. 

 

1681522519_Achtkantigepldrmlntemplatewithheklatten.thumb.jpg.7a9329eb2f6b12e3c791975309e0b317.jpg

 

Every heklat has a slightly different angle, so to lay it flat on the roede on needs to cut the area out, so it lays flat on the roede and downwards. 

The example shows it better. I made a piece from cardboard 

1266860514_Achtkantigepldrmlntemplatewithheklat16.thumb.jpg.77f4ee1b4feb13fc12617f4cf46b4068.jpg

656325519_Achtkantigepldrmlnzaaglijnheklat.thumb.jpg.ad250c9615639ddc1c7b3b5113531846.jpg

I hope this makes a bit of sense, if not you will understand it better when I take pictures doing the actual cutting 

Marcus 

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I started working on the fitting of the horizontal slats. 

 

First I angle the saw so it rests on both vertical pieces of the template. I saw at an angle and guess when I have gone deep enough on both sides. 

The plan shows how much angle needs to be cut and how to install all the pieces. 

399804474_Achtkantigepldrmlnroedeangles.thumb.jpg.e84618a278d9b855a8dc31a7d1eed4ca.jpg

With rifler files I remove the piece of wood where the slat will rest. 

1959192040_Achtkantigepldrmlnroedeinkeeping.thumb.jpg.f295a0c5ab511e0b3050602d235abd3b.jpg

The slat is fitted to see if the angle is correct. 

1676888246_Achtkantigepldrmlnroedemetheklat1.thumb.jpg.af166dc05988b83b6558472030ed37bc.jpg

509954261_Achtkantigepldrmlnroedemetheklat2.thumb.jpg.eedac7bbe9c1586254ad9d522216b00d.jpg

Once it is correct, the empty space will be filled with wood filler so the roede is even on all sides and once dry, a slat will be glued on top of the roede to hold it all together. 

1542559937_Achtkantigepldrmlnroedeheklatendeklat.thumb.jpg.216e55df4dbd0c563c9e954486b100c5.jpg

This process of installing the horizontal slats will be done 21 times at different angles. Times that by 4 vanes which equals 84.  Long process but in the end it should look pretty good 

Marcus 

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I was going to ask whether you would cut into the roede. The answer is obviously yes.

Do all four vanes have the same template? As in real life they don't have: the binnenroedeen de buitenroede are different: in the centre, they lay on top of each orher, the tips have ro be in one plane, making the inner one straight, and the outer one curved inside.

 

Jan

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# Jan. 

All the vanes have the same template. 

The instructions describe how the real vanes are made but that would be too difficult to create. So he describes an easier method that can be created for the model. 

 

In a real mill, the roedes are to be drilled out and the slats (heklatten) are fitted into the holes. 

 

In the instructions there are 2 inside roedes and 2 outside roedes 1 & 3 and 2 & 4. Also, many terms with descriptions. 

Marcus 

Achtkantige pldrmln, roede met heklatten .jpg

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Finished all 84 angle cuts on the 4 roudes. The blue tape is to keep the wood from splitting as I still need to drill 1/2" holes into the roedes. 

Once all that is done it is a matter of fitting and glueing the pieces that make up the vanes. 

 

Also clinker built the front of the cap which will be painted green. 

 

Still lots of paint work to do and purchase the material for making the bricks. 

Marcus 

Achtkantige pldrmln, roede 1.jpg

Achtkantige pldrmln, roede 84 angle cuts .jpg

Achtkantige pldrmln, front cap, clinker .jpg

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Completed drilling the holes in the roedes. Dry fitted them on the copper tubing that is part of the axle. 

Next comes building the vanes one by one. The instructions mention that this process is to work slowly and wait a day everytime you finish a step for the glue to completely dry. 

 

There is a step that I am not going to do. Two edges length wise of the roedes need to be planed. My biggest fear is that I may take off too much on them. Then the weight of the completed roedes will be different on each of them. 

 

All 4 roedes need to be close to the same weight, so it is balanced. I have a postal scale which I will use to weigh the roedes before I am permenantly attach them to the copper tubing. 

Marcus 

Achtkantige pldrmln, wieken .jpg

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Hi Markus,

 

not onlyneed the roedes the same weight, they need to have it at the same distance of the centre....

final balancing needs to be done when averything is ready: the roedes van have the same weight but still not be balanced. 

But it looks like if you will be finished before the rain season sets in. :)

Jan

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1 hour ago, amateur said:

Hi Markus,

 

not onlyneed the roedes the same weight, they need to have it at the same distance of the centre....

Jan, 

The copper tubing in which the roedes are attached to are all 90 degrees, so I am good on that one. 

I don't know about finishing her before the rain season sets in. I will be spending more time on making the vanes then building the mill structure. 

 

Looking at her with the roedes the mill is pretty big, but then compared to the house and when she is in the garden she won't look 'that' big. 

Marcus 

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Started on the vanes and while each step needs to dry overnight I will also be working on the triangular piece (kruiwerk) which will be positioned in the back of the mill. 

421361293_Achtkantigepldrmlnwiekparts1.thumb.jpg.bf86fb31d69f0a035b97493cbdf08d22.jpg

These are all the pieces that make up one vane (wiek). The 4 triangular pieces on the lower right of the picture are called 'kluften'. They hold the light brown long piece at an angle. This is part of the vane that catches the wind making the vane move in the wind. 

1946748380_Achtkantigepldrmlnwieken1.thumb.jpg.19cc420103484f242e80de706833efb0.jpg

The horizontal slats have been glued to the roedes. It will be drying overnight. Next time I will fill in the area on top of the slats with a combo of sawdust and glue. 

1978860738_Achtkantigepldrmlnwieken2.thumb.jpg.fef018991930d66daef82cdf77972846.jpg

This is to show the angles of all the slats. 

Marcus 

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Working on the vanes in stages. When one step is done from one vane, go to the next one and do another step. As for the glue used it is Tight bond III which is waterproof. The vanes will be painted except the slats. In reality a Miller doesn't paint his slats but uses an oil base material so he can regularly check his 'ladder' (slat parts) to check for broken slats. 

1442959180_Achtkantigepldrmln3stages.thumb.jpg.725c49b293d21c02422f1831f4c09b4f.jpg

Here are 3 stages of assembly. From left to right. Left: Glued the slats on the roedes. Middle :

Deklat which is a strip of wood glued on top of the roede and keep slats in place. Right: glued windbord in place. 

717424565_Achtkantigepldrmlnlatjesteektuit.thumb.jpg.6f6d346246be7f57a321ce0b7259a486.jpg

Strip of 5mm thick wood glued to the template. The slats are to end there. 

1040162505_Achtkantigepldrmlnplankkeeplatjeseven.thumb.jpg.7973844db0d0d7bfc28a213dbd26a7b5.jpg

Sheet of basswood clamped to the strips on the side to keep all slats aligned. 

797210587_Achtkantigepldrmlnroedeheklattendeklat.thumb.jpg.b04e1cd048d939b8bec4a189465c2854.jpg

Deklat installed. 

 

1528259293_Achtkantigepldrmlnkluiten.thumb.jpg.06c1a55b0e4d0e91747c429c3d38b4e6.jpg

The 4 triangles, or kluften hold the windboard at the same angle as all the other slats do. 

 

1876100481_Achtkantigepldrmlndeklatwindbord.thumb.jpg.5cf0de32acf86a03de358778fef35cee.jpg

Windboard is glued and clamped. 

Marcus 

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All 4 vanes have there horizontal slats (heklatten) glued in the roedes. 

1443308212_Achtkantigepldrmlntempformeas.zoomlat.thumb.jpg.00061250d9fd476ae5034f0c24cadab3.jpgStarted by measuring the spaces of the long vertical slats (zoomlatten) by creating a template from basswood with the width of 26mm. Pencil a line using the template as a ruler. 

 

192849180_Achtkantigepldrmlngluedotsforzoomlat.thumb.jpg.e4663ea3a645f6f7f506cc3743fcdee8.jpg

Apply glue dots along the pencil line. 

 

823271980_Achtkantigepldrmlntempbackon.thumb.jpg.2a55d1d28ac7d81ce876e71f3072ea50.jpg

Put the template back and clamp it to a slat. This will help me by aligning the vertical slat. 

 

831005051_Achtkantigepldrmlnfewclampson.thumb.jpg.8258cb21a3764569972af3a175c8c9c8.jpg

Push the vertical slat against the template and clamp to horizontal slats 

 

1149242341_Achtkantigepldrmlntempremoved.thumb.jpg.d6698c556ad4e07922556a4de68f57aa.jpg

Remove template. 

 

1263249356_Achtkantigepldrmlnclampsinplaceovernightdry.thumb.jpg.6c966d30b8febbd8b06afeb48455acc5.jpg

Start clamping each section and let dry overnight. 

1433559572_Achtkantigepldrmlnzoomlatdrogen.thumb.jpg.7f88d5923f82b479b337544adfa57ffd.jpg

Did the first part of 2 vanes and here they are drying. 

 

The above is a tedious job and will take the longest to complete. Everytime I do a vertical slat (zoomlat), I will let it dry overnight. 

Once they are completed I will paint some parts. 

Marcus 

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Vane one and two both have their 2nd vertical slat (zoomlat) glued on.

1562657278_Achtkantigepldrmln2dezoomlat.thumb.jpg.ba18be1e7003307322e71fb4c4239edc.jpg

313509372_Achtkantigepldrmln2dezoomlatgluedots.thumb.jpg.2034dfff081fc2138f2a0cb87e96066b.jpg

117526729_Achtkantigepldrmln2dezoomlatinplace.thumb.jpg.10e6e893fe803d332b972b7a109aa49d.jpg

The Titebond III dries fast. Per instructions is to clamp for 30 minutes and longer is better. Do not stress joints for 24 hours. Not much stress here so I will add the third vertical slat. 

330946871_Achtkantigepldrmlnzoomlat.thumb.jpg.77ff954d33c9bb514f9e3b3b3b2b5738.jpg

Do it three more times to have all the vanes look alike 

 

I have noticed that some of the horizontal slats are not straight, they are a bit on an angle. Doesn't interfere with moving in the wind but looks a bit weird. 

 

Another major mistake I made is that the 1st and 2nd vertical slats (1st en 2de midden zoomlat) have to be in the back of the horizontal slats. The 3rd vertical slat is to be placed in front of the horizontal slat (achter zoomlat). I am making all the vanes with this mistake. Not going to redo this. 

Marcus 

Edited by flying_dutchman2
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