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Tecko

Ship Dioramas You Would Like To Build

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Hoping this thread will be purely for ideas and inspirational purposes.

Show us an image, or provide a description, of a ship/maritime diorama you would like to build (if you could).

 

Please NO images of dioramas.

I am sure there will be some good ideas shared here that others have already built.

The idea is to inspire others to build their ideal diorama, even if it won't be the first one built.

 

I'll start with a scene I saw of the Titanic sinking. It's an old and common scene, but it is this particular one I would like to build one day.

 

17KpYag.jpg

 

So what dioramas would you like to build?

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Posted (edited)

Hi Tecko

 

This is a great idea for a thread. 

 

I’ll start off. One day, I’d love to build a shipyard scene with a highly detailed super yacht in a motorised hoist/cradle; you know, the type that slowly raises the ship out of the water onto land so that the ship can be worked on. 

 

One  day....

 

Cheers

 

Patrick

Edited by Omega1234

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Having just finished my round-stern workboat and being ready to move on to the next project, I've lately been contemplating building a diorama - something I've never done before. I think it would be an interesting experience. I find that I love to make small, detail stuff like tools and buckets and such, so my idea would be a boat shop, along the lines of the picture below.

boatshop.jpg.e8341b9ce4d27e71df73f399f8af86c1.jpg

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Tecko, I lived in the shadow of that volcano for thirty years. Mark Myers is one of my favorite marine artists. He painted that picture while visiting in Sitka,Alaska. I have forgotten the story of why those Aleut otter hunters were pulling those ships. But theres not much wind and the right of way there is very tight.

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6 hours ago, Kurt Johnson said:

By the time you finished modelling all those kayaks, they’d be fitting you for a straightjacket! Kayaks....nice pretty kayaks....yes, nice lovely kayaks...see the kayaks... my pretty........

Sorry you see it that way.

 

There are only three kayaks to make. The rest are copies from cast resin using a two part Plaster-of-Paris mold, used repeatedly.

Compared to scale of ship, these kayaks will be small. So the original kayak model could easily be shaped out of modelling clay.

 

The painted image has a viewpoint close to the water, to emphasis the kayaks. Otherwise, from a normal modelling viewpoint, it's a ship with many very small kayaks towing the ship.

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23 hours ago, Kurt Johnson said:

I really wasn’t being seious.

No worries Kurt. I was just protecting the original post, and idea, of this thread _ to inspire others to try something new.

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Posted (edited)

Here is an interesting painting that could be turned into a great diorama.

Yes it has a lot of horses too, but at least cavalry figurines can be bought by the box load.

One ship required. The others are painted on a backdrop. 

 

FhDury3.jpg

Edited by Tecko

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9 hours ago, amateur said:

...Problem is that it is not the ships, but the sea and air that make the atmosphere....

Not necessarily so. Artists use whatever they can in a composition to impart an emotion. The ships look somewhat drabby. The colour of the ships and sails, and how the foreground sail droops down. adds to the overall depression of the scene.

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I've never had the patience or nerve to try a diorama. But I like to display my models doing things. I'm thinking of my Constitution, anchored with a ships boat on one side being deployed from davits, and another boat on the other side tied up and loading (or unloading supplies). Part of my inspiration for this comes from Harold Hahn's book the Colonial Schooner-it has pictures of one of his schooners mounted on water, with one side cut away and the other side with a ship's boat loading cargo.

 

Another idea I've had is to build a model of 2 ships of the same period that never met, and raft them together. My  two favorites pairs are:

 

Pride of Baltimore 1 rafted up to Pride of Baltimore 2

and

HMS Bounty (Captain Bligh's boat) rafted up to HMS Pandora (also Bligh's boat).

 

Anyway, a couple thoughts to ponder.

 

Thanks,

 

Harvey

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2 hours ago, capnharv2 said:

I've never had the patience or nerve to try a diorama...

Thanks Harvey for sharing.

I can relate to your quote when I think about the diorama as a whole.

However, a large diorama can be made up of mini-dioramas. Each one is doable in achieving a result and with little patience.

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The Norwegians do that with their airplanes, too. Inside the mountain is a rabbit warren.

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Posted (edited)

... and the Swiss have turned their mountains into Swiss cheese ;)

 

Too many ideas for scenic displays or dioramas (a diorama, by definition is a box like a theatre stage, btw.) - I always (or most of the time) think of a model in this context.

 

Getting close to Amateur's ideas (though at the Zuiderzee and not the North Sea):

 

http://www.maritima-et-mechanika.org/maritime/models/botter/BotterModel/BotterModel-183.jpg

 

Or from the somewhat warmer South Pacific:

 

http://www.maritima-et-mechanika.org/maritime/models/gilbert/192401-72.JPG

 

Edited by wefalck

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