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Posted (edited)

Image result for picnic sailing ship aground warrnambool

 

This picture shows the Falls of Halladale which ran aground off Peterborough on the south coast of Victoria, Australia in 1908. There were no casualties. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falls_of_Halladale

 

She is still under full sail and seems to be intact until you look carefully. A sorry end to a beautiful ship, but of course people came to look, and of course it was an occasion for a picnic.

 

She is now a favourite spot for divers, and her cargo of slates was later recovered and used for roofing at the Flagstaff Maritime village at Warrnambool.

 

Steven

Edited by Louie da fly

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Interesting that she's still under full sail;

Reminds me of the saying:

 

"When you find yourself stuck in a deep hole, the first thing to do is stop digging?

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9 hours ago, Altduck said:

Interesting that she's still under full sail;

That's what took me by surprise as well. They have a huge copy of the photo on the wall in the entry to the Maritime Village. It takes a moment for it to register - hey, hang on - that's wrong . . .

 

Steven

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It's not wrong, it probably is to keep her on the "rocks" for without she would be pulled off and pushed on again, and again, and break up so much faster. Now they have a steady - more or less - platform to work on, and save those aboard, and (some of) the cargo ...

 

Cheers

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Official sources, especially an account from Mr Jessie Scott MacGillivray, a resident of Peterborough in 1908 seem to confirm what Steven says. 29 man were too busy abandoning the ship and left her foundering with the sails unfurled.

 

This has not prevented the ship to be battered against the rocks thereafter.

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3 hours ago, Peter Y. said:

This has not prevented the ship to be battered against the rocks thereafter.

that will happen eventually depending on the sea's force sooner or later

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Carl,

 

I considered the possibility they wanted to keep her firmly on the rocks so she wouldn't slip back into deeper water - but if so, could have done it with one, or maybe a few sails, not almost all off them; that's a lot of canvas up.

 

And as you point out, it would only delay the inevitable.

 

 

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I don't have to be right, at least I got you thinking :D:D as written by Peter, it is most likely they just wanted to get the hell off the ship, no matter what ... I would

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Don't know if it's an optical illusion, but it appears the ship is very close to shore. Would it be normal to see a ship of that size so close to shore in Australia? I know it sure wouldn't be here in Florida on the Gulf of Mexico, where the water runs very shallow, sometimes quite a long distance from shore.

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The part of the southern coast where she went up is now known as 'the shipwreck coast'.  A lot of sailing ships came to grief along there - many with great loss of life.

 

The problem was that ships would come across the Southern Ocean taking advantage of the usually strong westerly winds to make a good passage.  The problem was that their first landfall was a rocky and cliff bound coast with (sat that time) no navigation aids.  It was quite common for ships to come up on the Australian coast after having had no sign of sun or stars for weeks on end and sometimes their DR navigation was wildly inaccurate, resulting in this sort of result if they happened to come up on the coast at night! 

 

Of course some more modern ships came in very close to the coast on purpose.  There was a breed of coastal ship masters who got terribly nervous if they were out of sight of land and hugged the coast often dangerously closely.  They were known as 'dog barkers' on the assumption that they actually navigated by listening to and recognising the barks of the various dogs up and down the coast!

 

John

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, CDW said:

Don't know if it's an optical illusion, but it appears the ship is very close to shore. Would it be normal to see a ship of that size so close to shore in Australia? I know it sure wouldn't be here in Florida on the Gulf of Mexico, where the water runs very shallow, sometimes quite a long distance from shore.

Due to the hight of the coast, you cannot see the real distance from the shore, so it looks closer than it is, your mind will make a wrong interpretation (the famous optical illusion), although she will certainly be close enough in shore

 

Have a look at the coast e.g. here

Edited by cog

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10 hours ago, CDW said:

Don't know if it's an optical illusion, but it appears the ship is very close to shore. Would it be normal to see a ship of that size so close to shore in Australia? I know it sure wouldn't be here in Florida on the Gulf of Mexico, where the water runs very shallow, sometimes quite a long distance from shore.

The full photo gives you a better perspective (source: State Library of South Australia):

PRG-1373-18-17.jpeg.ca2862ce20d3c5f8a18f544c0741c3a5.jpeg

Also the Australian Department of the Environment and Energy has something called the Australian National Shipwreck Database. According to it the wreck location is: -38.61 (latitude), 142.86 (longitude) - if you type that into Google Maps and measure the distance from the coast you end up with a value of about 425m/1400ft.

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