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That’s pretty interesting. I’ve never seen models displayed that way before. I liked the second video of the opening of Sir Francis Drake’s chest. That would be a neat place to work.

 

Kurt

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    Very unique display of some very fine looking models.  I wonder just how old some of them really are.  They appear to be pre-power tool vintage, which makes all of the fine detail work on them all the more impressive!  The craftsmanship is amazing! 

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Some of the models in the AGO Thomson Collection are displayed suspended in the same way. No accidents - as far as I know!

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On 9/2/2018 at 5:26 PM, Kurt Johnson said:

That’s pretty interesting. I’ve never seen models displayed that way before. I liked the second video of the opening of Sir Francis Drake’s chest. That would be a neat place to work.

 

Kurt

I missed that... Was he sedated?  😀

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Great News! Time to schedule another visit to see good friends in the U.K....and drag them along to the NMM revitalized exhibits!

I believe the "hanging" models will be fine for the length of the exhibition. In the photo here, I used 75# test monofilament fishing line to suspend my "HMS Godspeed." The 41" long 4-masted schooner is displayed at St. John's Church in Mamaroneck, NY. I finished the model 3 years ago and placed it in the church soon thereafter....and the pastor tells me it's still hanging. I'm returning this Fall to "clean" (dust off) the large model. It's on a pole which can be easily lowered to ground level with twin ropes either side of the sanctuary. Ron

GodspeedStJohns.jpg.62e4682b5b7d18842f05f4c6257f22f7.jpg

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Makes me want to plan a trip over the pond. Thank you for sharing the video...Moab

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Good Evening Chuck;

 

Thanks for posting this.  I have not heard of it before now.  I will be there before too long,  and will try and check this out and put a few pictures up so that fellow modellers can see something to help them decide if this is worth putting on their itinerary.

 

The best outcome is that some of the people who see these models will be inspired to try and have a go at modelling themselves.

 

All the best,

 

Mark

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I've only been to the NMM once, perhaps twenty years ago, but I can't imagine going to London without spending a whole day there. (You can catch Cutty Sark and the Royal Observatory at the same time.) The Imperial War Museum and the Science Museum remain on my "bucket list." My Wife wanted to go shopping at Harrod's, so I took the water taxi down to Greenwich for the day. It was a "win/win" for us because she just hates it when I stop to read the text plaques on museum exhibits. IIRC, Greenwich allows photography if you ask the museum guards and are unobtrusive. Not so the Scheepartsmuseum in Amsterdam, although I was able to take a few there on the sly. Nowdays, with digital photography, it should be much easier to get good shots without a flash, which most all museums prohibit without special permission.

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Was on a business trip, sneaked out of the office to visit this exhibit. 

Disclaimer: this was my first time in NMM, haven't been there previously.

Got pleasantly surprised! I remember sad stories on MSW about NMM putting all models into storage and replacing them with a low-quality multimedia junk for kids. This is no longer true. 

The expositions are really high quality, with quite a few fantastic models on display.

 

The Tudor models exposition is quite small, actually. Just 6 models, and I like the hanging-wire display - this way it is much easier to see the hull and you can fit more models into the same area, while allowing a better view than in a regular display case:

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Both famous Bellona models are on display as well! And in fantastic shape. But those are located in a weird place, you can only see them from the back and one side. Impossible to see the frontal part of the ship, which is a bit weird:

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Some school kids were quite interested in models as well:

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Will not post any close-up photos to avoid spoiling it for future visitors of the museum. 

But let me know if you need it, will send a link with a lot of close-up photos, especially for Bellona. Unfortunately I only had a phone to take pictures, and the lighting is complicated (a lot of reflections).

 

I saw very few screens in the whole museum, and it was appropriate where necessary (for example - interactive guide to using sextant and coordinates). So either NMM changed radically, or I the whole story about models hidden in storage was about another maritime museum in UK? 

The "four new galleries" advertised on their website cover half of the museum, so it would be fair to say that it went through a major changes. 

 

It definitely worth a visit. Was pretty quiet in a morning, just a few school groups spread over the whole museum, so pretty empty. 

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Sounds like there have been some real changes for the better at Greenwich!

 

I wonder what's happened?  Kevin Fewster is still the Director - he's been there since the beginning of 2012 - so there must have been either a major change in policy at a higher level or a general change in museum philosophy.  I hope it's the latter - it might filter through to the Australian National Maritime Museum here in Sydney.

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Thanks for the pics from NMM. Nice! When I was there (about 15 years ago) there was almost nothing to see - mostly lots of silly interactive displays for kindergarteners and hardly any models. Photography was prohibited without any exceptions, and the ban strictly enforced.

 

If your camera is a SLR type, next time you take pics of models, try using a polarising filter and set the camera on Aperture priority, select the smallest aperture (biggest F number) for the greatest depth of field and mount it on a tripod (if allowed in the museum).

The polariser will eliminate (or greatly reduce) glass glare reflections from model cases, but will slightly lengthen exposure time. Also, the small aperture (opening) will greatly lengthen exposure time, which the camera will automatically select. For these reasons, you'll unfortunately need a tripod, since hand held photography will almost certainly smudge the pics (you won't be able to keep the camera steady for such a long exposure time (usually about half a minute or longer, depending on the ambient light). DON'T EVER USE A FLASH!!!

Use a cable release or self timer to avoid accidently shaking the camera with your finger during picture taking.

You might also have to adjust white ballance to something like "Incandescent" setting, so your pictures won't turn too yellow.

 

Thanks again!!   :-)

Thomas

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This thread has prompted me to plan another visit to Greenwich, not only to the NMM but also to the adjacent Royal Observatory to see Harrison's chronometers. I was last at the NMM 13 years ago for the 200th anniversary of Trafalgar, and it was totally different to the museum others have described - full of the most interesting and well organised displays - especially the models section and of course the Nelson exhibits.  Mike Y's description in an earlier post sounded much closer to my experience, and I'm glad to hear that things are apparently back the way they were.

 

Derek

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5 hours ago, Dziadeczek said:

When I was there (about 15 years ago) there was almost nothing to see - mostly lots of silly interactive displays for kindergarteners and hardly any models. Photography was prohibited without any exceptions, and the ban strictly enforced.



Hi Thomas,

 

Yes, this is definitely not how it looks today.

About the photo ban - to be honest, I was not checking any warnings signs, maybe it is still prohibited? But I spent plenty of time taking phone photos (no flash, of course) - and museum workers were not reacting to it at all. And I was not the only one.

It is kind of silly to try to enforce that ban nowadays - people make phone photos in all museums, and trying to fight against it will just lead to hundreds of angry reviews on tripadvisor, reducing the visitor numbers :) 

 

Few more teaser photos. The models are spread among the other parts of the museum, and not concentrated in one place. Unfortunately I had no time to carefully read explore it, since I only had an hour for the entire museum. But will definitely spend more time there next time!

 

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Mike,

Thanks for posting these photos. All the changes appear to be worthwhile and greatly expanded from my last visit. I should mention to those who might contemplate a visit to the NMM that an excursion to Portsmouth (plan on at least one o'night) should be on one's agenda. Not only do you get to see the amazing Vic, but the Mary Rose Exhibit is excellent as well  - and the (smallish) museum adjacent to the Victory is very worthwhile - especially the superb dioramas and a series of original book cover artworks for the Patrick O'Brian novels by renowned artist, Geoff Hunt. Oh yes, and do go to the Greenwich Observatory!

Ron

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yinka-shonibare.jpg

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