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Ozark

When to use what glue?

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Hello 

I have questions on what type of glue to use on the Revell USS Constitution. basically where to use CA glue and where to use the liquid plastic cement. Oh and then there is the white glue. I just do not want it to start falling apart in 5  or 10 years. 

I have read a lot of the build logs and it seems people are using different glues on the same thing. So I guess that's where my confusion comes from.

 

Thank's Ozark

 

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For joining styrene to styrene, I always use a liquid solvent like Testors.  With the model parts joined together, you can use a small pointed brush or a pipette to apply the solvent to the joint.  Capillary action will wick the solvent into the joint and effectively “melt” the parts together quite neatly. 

 

I typically use CA for attaching resin or photo etched parts.  Thin CA will wick into joints neatly too.  

 

White glue can also be used for attaching photo etched parts, especially small-scale ship’s railings and such. 

 

And for gap gap filling I haven’t found anything better than Bondo Spot and Glazing putty.

 

My oldest surviving models are 20+ years old and everything seems to be holding together.

 

HTH,

 

Keith

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29 minutes ago, barkeater said:

In this instance, the model is plastic

What you said is true but Kieth did pretty much limit his answer to glues that would be used in building a plastic model.

 

The only thing I would possibly add would be the use of either wood(White Glue) or some other glues designed for the purpose when attaching clear plastic parts in order to keep them from glazing. Not a normal requirement when building plastic ships but could be applicable. 

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I apologize if my comment was taken as a criticism to Kieth's post. I thought it was a good answer and I did see he was referring to styrene. I just wanted to make sure that somebody who just bought their first wood kit did not miss that the discussion was about plastic models.

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Tamiya extra thin or the Mr Hobby Mr Cement S for most parts it's very neat and welds the pieces together and evaporates leaving little or no trace on surfaces which can be lightly sanded away. 

 

CA for PE I use Zap thin and medium but I have seen people use glue sticks for certain PE situations, haven't tried myself.

 

Also use Revel Contacta Professional in certain situations it's the same as the 'classic' glue we all used to use as kids and make such a mess but this one comes with a neat application tube. I would be wary of using it on visible areas.

 

Micro crystal clear for clear parts such as canopies on planes.

Edited by Richmond

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5 hours ago, barkeater said:

my comment was taken as a criticism

Hello Barkeater

I think I need to apologize not you.

 

I was not trying to be critical, But my comment did come across that way when I read it over just now after reading your reply.  I should have not worded it the way I did. Your heads up about the topic being about plastic models not wooden models is, and was valid,

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Ca for pe? What does pe stand for? 

When you say styrene you mean polystyrene? The model is made of polystyrene correct?

Im not sure, does the kit have resin or photoetched parts? Isnt everything polystyrene except for the string and maybe the sails?

 

Thanks for the replys averyone. Ozark

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Hi Ozark

Here is a list as I see it. Others may have a more detailed description or comprehensive list.

 

PE = Photoetch

 

Styrene/ Polystyrene pretty much interchangeable in this contex

 

Some kits come with photoetch and others do not, but many kits do have after market photoetch details available. 

 

Very few kits come with resin parts. Resin parts are usually more accurate or detailed castings of fixtures on the model and are most often after market replacements for items that are already in the kit, or additional items for enhanced detailing of a kit. They are most often created by small cottage industry companies.

 

A relatively new product that could be added to this list is 3D printed parts. These are very similar to resin castings, but in many or most cases are more finely detailed as they are computer generated and not restricted the mold process required by both the original plastic kit and the resin process.  

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Thank you all for the help.

I have a better understanding of it now. But from reading all these logs, it looks like I have a lot to learn about nautical terminology. But as I go through the building process, I will learn what every thing is called.

 

Thanks, Ozark

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Ozark

No one knows it all. Post your progress on the Constitution and continue as you have started by reaching out with questions when you wish to understand and sooner than you know you will be able to pass your new found knowledge and abilities on to others. That is how this forum works. The collective knowledge will almost always be able to solve any question.

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