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Blackening gun barrels provided in Mamoli Victoria kit

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Hi, please advise how to blacken gun barrels provided in Mamoli Victoria kit.  I would not like having them painted - too much work and paint comes off easily. Hopefully blackening is easier and more stable?

Thanks

YT

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Depends on what the cannons are made from. If brass, use Birchwood Casey Brass Black. If it is Brittania metal it may still blacken with Birchwood Casey depending on the compound of the metal - it is usually copper/tin/antimony. If Birchwood Casey doesnt work you may have to paint. Admiralty Paints produce an excellent and realistic black metal paint. Birchwood Casey can be bought on eBay. 

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Thank you, hornet. Here is a picture of a cannon barrel. It is already finished somehow in sort of copper finis. I do not think it is brass as as I shaved a trace of finish one can see some white metal. Do you think Birchwood Casey Brass Black would work?

IMG_6093.JPG

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With that coppery looking finish it is hard to say but I doubt it unless you removed the finish, then it might work. To be honest, in this case, I’d probably paint with a Matt (metal) black paint. I have used Admiralty Paints by jokita for this purpose with excellent results. You could buy some Birchwood Casey and experiment. It is good stuff to have anyway. 

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I agree with Hornets choice of paint! Admiralty Matt (metal) black paint really looks like painted metal!!! With a good metal primer it should not chip off all too easy...

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Thanks all I appreciate your comments. I for sure will clean up and paint the barrels black. I juts hoped there is some easier way to get them right but apparentl7y there is no nice shortcuts here. I will use regular matt finish acrylic paint I already have. It looks very decent. I will prime with car body gray spray primer I have.

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You can add a bit of realism and plasticity by rubbing the painted barrels with graphite recovered by rubbing a very soft lead-pencil (B7 or B8) on a piece of sandpaper. Another option is to accentuate edges on the barrels with such a pencil and then blend this in with a cotton stick.

In reality such barrels would have been painted with black oil-paint.

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If a hole was drilled into the bore at the mouth that would push fit a copper wire handle.

The black paint thinned a bit.  Would dipping the cannon into a paint filled test tube give a

more even coat?  Would several thin coats give a better result?

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It is always advisable to paint in thin layers, twice would be enough.
If the cannons were iron, it would be enough to paint them black and rub them with graphite.. But in this case the ideal would be to use black and gold in equal parts (you can use more black but no more gold). Then the color obtained will be mixed with a third of green, increasing or decreasing the proportion of this color depending on the oxidation intensity you want to simulate.

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Dip-painting is not as easy at it looks. The paint has to have the right viscosity and one needs to turn the piece around until the paint sets, so that it does not accumulate in low parts. If the viscosity is too high, the paint would also tend to form 'fillets' around surface details, making them thus blurred.

 

Spray painting is certainly the best option. Airbrushes and compressors are quite affordable these days.

 

My advice was for painting iron cannons. Simulating patinated bronze is another story. Don't have any experience with that. In any case the patina my be worn off at edges, high points of cast-on decorations and the like, so that one would need to highlight these with bronze paint.

 

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