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Glenns_TX

HMS Bounty by GlennS_TX - Corel - 1:130 Scale

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It’s a cold rainy night here in north Texas folks. Well cold to us. Only reached 40F today. Expecting the same all week. So no airbrushing for the Arizona until it warms up above 70. 

 

What you see pictured above is CorelLine’s SM104. A solid wood hull HMS Bounty kit in 1:130 scale. Corel claims they are beginner kits. Model-Expo delivered her promptly last week.

 

This HMS Bounty kit is my second attempt at wood ship modeling in 25+ years. The first being Constructo’s 1799 Enterprise. Enterprise remains shelved pending the results of this and a few other simpler wood model kit builds. With your help, Frank Mastini’s book and the Sultana Practicum pdfs, I’ll be proud of the completed model. Wish me luck fellow modelers.

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So Tav.1 says finish the hull with sandpaper paying attention to steps and grooves. Which I take to mean to not over sand them. I have 60, 150 and 220 grit wood sandpaper. Another post I read here seemed to suggest 60 could quicky strip away too much. So I began with 150. Focusing on smoothing the hull.

 

But there are areas where it has carving marks or endentations. Do I sand until they’re gone?

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And the deck has a finger nail thick raised section. Do I sand that until it’s level?

 

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Thanks.

Edited by Glenns_TX

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The mark in the first photo looks like a dent. That should probably be filled in with wood filler, which will be hidden if you plan to paint the model. The rebate cut into the hull is where the bulwarks will be attached, so no, don't sand the hull down to that line -- unless you want a slimmer, trimmer, Bounty-Lite.

 

Cheers!

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During my free evenings, when I haven't been working on my USS Arizona build, I've been reading Mr. Mastini's book. As well as looking at build logs for solid hull ships. Looking at instructions and practicums on Model-ExpoOnline. But the only ones I've found cover model shipways kits. Those solid hull ships appear to be more roughly carved. And require extra carving and sanding with provided templates to achieve the proper shape of the hull. I'll have to double check when I get home. But I don't think my Corel kit has templates. And the hull appears to be completely shaped. So I guess I just need to fill and sand. But from what I've learned, I should read all the instructions again. Because many manufacturers instructions are inadequate.

 

The closest Bounty build I could find was a 12 part series on Gary Brinker's Youtube series. I believe he built Constructo's HMS Bounty kit. His comments have me fearing my upcoming build of their Enterprise kit. But since mine is over 25 years old, maybe their quality standards higher then.

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My memory was correct. There are no templates to shape the hull. Looks like it needs only filling and minor sanding. 

I read ahead. Tav1 calls for glueing the laser cut bulkwark pieces before planking the deck. That’s in Tav2. But this site’s FAQ, http://www.shipmodeling.ca/aa918.html , says plank decks before hull. And that order makes sense. Planking the deck would be easier without the bulwarks in place. What do you guys think?

Edited by Glenns_TX

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9 hours ago, Glenns_TX said:

What do you guys think?

That would seem logical to me as well.

Edited by lmagna

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I agree with Al. Laying the deck planks before attaching the bulkheads is the way to go. Make them a little proud at the edges and then sand them even with the lip. Take a pencil and darken one side of your plank prior to glueing to simulate caulking. Don’t worry it is just a model, have fun with it. Each and every model is an education.

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Sanded the last of the filler off the hull. Cut out the laser cut keel sections. Scraped the burn marks off with my Exacto knife. And glued them to the hull. But, the bottom section broke in two. This Walnut is plywood is very fragile. Don’t know how I will handle the thinner and more detailed sections yet.

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I will be planking the deck with the Tanganyika strips before I add the bulwarks. The bow section will require significant bending. The instructions say I can use a manual or electric plank bender, or soak in hot water and alcohol. Given how easily the bottom keel snapped, do I chance bending the bow bulwarks with by manual plank bender? I mean, the keel snapped easier than a toothpick.

 

And for the gap in the keel sections, do I fill with the same wood putty. Or a blend stick?

Edited by Glenns_TX

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So Gents, I read somewhere not to use white or wood glue for the decking. Something about it dampening the wall. It said airplane cement. Do they mean the testers tube of plastic cement? This kit kit’s decking is 0.6 x 3 mm Tanganyika strips. 

 

Now if I would only remember what I did with my rulers.

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These things should come with a warning label. Because if I wasn’t crazy before, I will be by the time I finish. If the ship doesn’t finish me first. Managed to drop it tonight. Sustained minor damage to the stern laser cut keel piece. Surprisingly, the bow section and cut water appear unscathed.

Cut 3 strips of Tanganyika into 4cm strips per the instructions. Here are a few columns and rows laid out. Hope gets easier once you glue a few first.

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OK, I found where I read about using contact or airplane cement. It was the instructions for the Sultana and applying it's deck sheeting. So I guess that means regular wood strips can be glued with white or wood glue.

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I typically use white glue for planking (both deck and hull planking).  I’ll use small amounts of CA in spots where the planking needs extra help staying down until the white glue dries.

Edited by GrandpaPhil

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It’s not the best jig in the world. But it will have to do. 

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I sure hope this cleans up. It looks terrible right now. 

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My neck and shoulders are sore now. How can someone spend all day building?

 

 

 

Edited by Glenns_TX

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12 hours ago, Glenns_TX said:

can someone spend all day building?

I wish I could get the chance to try! I think it would be my lower back that would suffer though.

 

I am not sure what you are saying about your planking. Looks good from here! It will look even better when you are done, install the deck openings, do a little sanding, and add the bulwarks and deck furniture. Shipyard construction always looks messy! 

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Glenns, I am not sure how far along you are with cutting the planks, but if you have some free time this weekend I actually just posted a few pictures of a plank cutting jig that you can make yourself for relatively cheap. The pictures can be found in my build log on here for the San Francisco II. 

 

As Imagna said, planking never looks pretty while it is being carried out but from what I've seen the final product always seems to turn out way better than anticipated. I like the idea that you are planking a solid hull, looking back I wish i would have attempted that with my previous one

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Some quick searches indicate the original HMS Bounty's submerged hull was outfitted with copper sheathing for her mission. This kit says paint her white. So my options are paint it white. Buy copper sheathing and glue it to the hull. Anyone ever use metallic copper paint?

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How about this? 

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And based on this thread,

 

 

 

And the Sea Tales Documentary ,I’m going with these colors.

 

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Edited by Glenns_TX

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1 hour ago, Glenns_TX said:

So I guess I should sand and seal tomorrow? 

I don't know if sanding and sealing or locating and cutting out the various deck openings is next, but you might consider making the openings in the deck before installing the bulwarks just for ease of handling.

 

I think I would be more inclined to go with the copper strips below the waterline not only fo rthe looks but if the research says that she had a copper bottom at the time you are depicting then you are stuck with it! I think you would find that copper colored paint would not look all that good on this model anyway.

 

Just an opinion, worth what you paid for it.

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What length should the copper strips be? The Kate Cory at a scale of 3/16" : 1' calls for strips of 1/4" x 3/4". The copper tape I have is 3/16" wide. A little too wide for my Bounty at 1:130 scale. But I will  make due. The instructions said the decking should be 4cm. So I'm guessing 1cm for the copper strips. That is probably too long. But shorter lengths will make this tedious task and arduous and almost unmanageable one. I still have time before I reach this stage.

  • Sand deck
  • Paint and install deck furniture
  • Install bulwarks
  • Install wales
  • Find and mark water line
  • Fill sand, paint and seal
  • Find and mark Gore line.
  • Then copper stripping.
Edited by Glenns_TX

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I am feeling a little out of my comfort zone offering any  advice on this as like many things in wooden ship building I have no personal experence with coppering a ships hull. The only ships I have ever built with copper bottoms were the Revell Constitution and  Charles W. Morgan, both in plastic and both as a teen sometime back when Plesiosaurs were swimming in the sea. but luckily there are others that have written on the subject! One of them are here: http://modelshipworldforum.com/ship-model-framing-and-planking-articles.php 

 

As for the size of the plates, this may give you some insight: https://ussconstitutionmuseum.org/2016/11/18/new-copper-sheathing-2/

 

Hope that gives you some help.

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Thanks again Lou. I looked through the Constitution link which gave total area. But that got me to look at the HMS Victory. The average plate for her is 1220cm x 256cm. At 1:130 scale I should use 9.38cm x 2.74cm.

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I hope the size of plates on the Victory are in line with the much smaller Bounty. 1220 X 256 cm seems pretty large. I linked the Constitution because #1 I knew there was information on the size of her plates with pictures of people holding plates, and #2 plenty of pictures. I wanted to do the same with the CW Morgan as she has also gone through a restoration recently but even though I can find some mention that she is also coppered the pictures do not seem to support this.It seems that she has been painted with anti fouling paint only. I don't know if any of the replica ships around have copper bottoms.

 

I was able to find this in regards to the Constitution's 1927-1931 refit:

  • Ship has been copper sheathed from keel to 23’ 6” aft and to a height of 21’ 0” forward – 3,400 sheets of copper, 14”x 48”, in various weights; 28-oz. between keel and shoe, 26-oz. at turn of bilge and at water line; remainder 22-oz., all of which is secured to wood planking by 1 1/8” and 1 ¼” copper sheathing nails.  Approximately 12.5 tons of sheathing copper, 1600 pounds [copper] sheathing nails,  38.4 tons new copper fastening used; 4 tons old copper fastening [reused?], 8 tons old copper left in ship; a total of  63.7 tons of  copper now in the ship. [Commandant, U.S. Navy Yard, Boston, “U.S. Frigate CONSTITUTION (IX21) – Research Memorandum”, 1931, 60.]
Edited by lmagna

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No construction progress tonight. The Mrs. wanted me to take her some place this evening. She has difficulty navigating. So while waiting for her I examine my parts and  plans more closely. To see all the deck furniture I need to prepare. Some I need only paint and glue in place. Others I need to make. I think you’re right Lou. Building from the inside out looks like the way to go. I don’t know why Corel didn’t write the instructions that way. Especially with how tight everything is at this scale. But at least this one didn’t look like a toy on their box display.

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Is a planksheer always a horizontal board at a right angle to a strake or wale? Doesn't look like the Bounty has them. Unless it's just my kit?

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19 hours ago, Glenns_TX said:

I don’t know why Corel didn’t write the instructions that way.

That seems to be a common complaint about ship model kits no matter who makes them.

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