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Valeriy V

Cruiser Varyag 1901 by Valeriy V - scale 1:75

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1 hour ago, wefalck said:

Nice parts ! Did you take pictures while you were making them ?

Unfortunately it was impossible to photograph. Both hands were busy soldering parts.

 

I hope that this scheme will explain all my actions.

scupper 1.jpg

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33 minutes ago, KeithAug said:

Valeriy,

 

Very Nice work. I think I would have chickened out and made them from preformed channel.

Thank you, Keith!

I was thinking about the channel, but it does not solve the tasks that I set for myself:
- the scoop should cover the frame
- the back wall should be bent up

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1 hour ago, wefalck said:

Thanks. I was asking, as I soon will have to make some similar parts, ash-scuttles - only two, but in 1:160 scale, so much thinner material ;)

I am in anticipation of delight.  At your scale, this part will be half the size!!!   :) 

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Well, actually not. In real terms the ash-chutes will have about the same size, but materials thicknesses have to be more delicate, having been made on the prototype from thin steel-sheet. I am also trying to reproduce on many parts the mode of assembly/fastening, i.e. the rivetting. Hence, I am using surface-etched parts.

Edited by wefalck

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I don't know how you do such fine work in metal. I'm pretty good with wood, but the moment I try making small stuff in metal I'm a complete klutz 😖. I have the greatest respect for anyone who can produce such exquisite workmanship.

 

I take my hat off to you, sir!

 

Steven

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7 hours ago, Louie da fly said:

I don't know how you do such fine work in metal. I'm pretty good with wood, but the moment I try making small stuff in metal I'm a complete klutz 😖. I have the greatest respect for anyone who can produce such exquisite workmanship.

 

I take my hat off to you, sir!

 

Steven

Steven, thanks for your kind words!
I think that if you are engaged in building models of metal with the same diligence as the model of wood, then you still get great.  :) 

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On 2/6/2019 at 4:24 PM, wefalck said:

Well, actually not. In real terms the ash-chutes will have about the same size, but materials thicknesses have to be more delicate, having been made on the prototype from thin steel-sheet. I am also trying to reproduce on many parts the mode of assembly/fastening, i.e. the rivetting. Hence, I am using surface-etched parts.

This is a hatch for dumping ashes overboard, did I understand you correctly?

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I've enjoyed immensely your application of electroforming and fine soldering of your metal joinery on your builds.

I think it is amazing that you are not electro plating on another metal..but Forming new copper on electro conductive paint.

Makes so much sense in the building of your finely curved and molded parts.

 

Wonderful work indeed.

 

Rob

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Exactly. A sort of a box inboard of the bulwark (in my example, but could be also on a lower deck) with a lid. This leads into a rectangular shaft outside, that reaches down to about 1 m above the CWL. The ash is hoisted from the boiler-room in buckets that are then suspended from overhead rails on which they can be moved to the chutes. They are always arranged symmetrically on both, starboard and port, so that the ash can be always dumped on lee.

One can see these installations on old war-ship photographs, the ash-chutes are rectangular boxes, while the drains from toilets etc. are half-round.

Nice work on the torbedo-crane - as habitually 👍

Edited by wefalck

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The bridge is the Levensauer Hochbrücke (High Bridge at Levensau) a bit north of Kiel. On the right-hand side there was a garden café in later years, where we used to go when visiting my grandparents in Kiel. You could nicely watch the passing ships from there.

Since the opening of the Canal it was a popular spot to photograph passing ships. The Kiel maritime photographer family Renard has been doing this for some hundred years. Post WWII they lived next door to my grandparents.

The bridge was modernised in 1954, when the towers were removed. In 1984 a parallel new road-bridge was built and this year they begin with the construction of a replacement, which will allow taller ships to pass throught he canal.

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Those were the days!😉 You can see that everything on board was made bright and shining for the visit of the two emperors.

Looking to the amount of ventilation pipes you will have a lot of electro forming work.

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35 minutes ago, G.L. said:

Those were the days!😉 You can see that everything on board was made bright and shining for the visit of the two emperors.

Looking to the amount of ventilation pipes you will have a lot of electro forming work.

I'm not going to build the  "Standart"  model for the time being, but I like this ship very much like many other modellers.  :) 

 

 

 Boat yacht "Standart".

a1.jpg

a2.jpg

a3.jpg

a5.jpg

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I gather these yachts are relatively well documented by photographs. Wish this was the case for more mundane ships as well ...

 

Talking about this: is there a place, where one could find pictures of German ships and harbours that were taken by Russian photographers during such visits ? I gather, there were several of them, before WWI.

Edited by wefalck

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