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Valeriy V

Cruiser Varyag 1901 by Valeriy V - scale 1:75

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28 minutes ago, wefalck said:

Wish this was the case for more mundane ships as well ...

 

 

On such worldly ships there were no girls princes with photo cameras. The memory of the  "Standard"  in the photos remained thanks to them.

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2 hours ago, Valeriy V said:

I'm not going to build the  "Standart"  model for the time being, but I like this ship very much like many other modellers.  :) 

 

 

 Boat yacht "Standart".

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Wonderful pictures, thank you!

Do we know anything of the colors of the "dingys" and "lifeboats" of Standart?

The yacht herself was black, but I recall having read somewhere that these were very very dark blue (and white).

Any info on this would be wonderful.

 

Kind regards

 

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46 minutes ago, VonHoldinghausen said:

 

Wonderful pictures, thank you!

Do we know anything of the colors of the "dingys" and "lifeboats" of Standart?

The yacht herself was black, but I recall having read somewhere that these were very very dark blue (and white).

Any info on this would be wonderful.

 

Kind regards

 

More photos of "Standard" are here   https://www.flickr.com/photos/149552988@N02/albums

 

About the dark blue color of the boats I know nothing unfortunately.

 

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31 minutes ago, wefalck said:

Incidentally, I wondered, why no-one mentioned this other brilliant model from the Ukraine, one of the SHTANDART:

 

Alexey is already finishing his beautiful model and these photos are unlikely to be needed for him.

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1 hour ago, ccoyle said:

Just the launch by herself would make a great model.

I was just thinking the same thing.

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Knurling is an elegant way of cheating in gear manufacturing, if you don't have a milling attachment or a milling machine ;)

 

Here is the set-up I used, but the gears are somewhat smaller:

 

wespe-progress-115.jpg

wespe-progress-117.jpg

These are the gears as cut off, they still need to be turned on their face.

 

And cutting the rack for training guns on a metal-shaper:

 

wespe-progress-020.jpg

 

Edited by wefalck

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In engineering one prefers coarser knurls these days, so it is not so easy to find fine enough knurls these days at a reasonable price.

 

Another method on the lathe and without any special tools is the following: stick strip of paper around your chuck or another suitable part on the lathe spindle. This paper should be marked with lines of equal distance and of the number of teeth you want to cut - easy to do with a drawing program on the computer. You also need to put somewhere on the headstock an index mark. Then grind a lathe tool with the desired tooth profile and mount it turned by 90° (i.e. the cutting face towards the headstock) at exactly centre-height. This tool now is operated like a shaper tool on the blank. You would also need to break the lathe spindle, say with a wooden wedge slightly pushed under the chuck. By moving the carriage forward and backward, you can cut one tooth after the other. The gears will not be really functional probably, but good enough for a static display.

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Not quite ;) I was also cheating with the burr that did not really have the right tooth-profile, but was good enough to look convincing on gears with a maximum diamter of 4 mm. Since I made them, I acquired a (very expensive, but I am also collecting such tools) attachment (a so-called topping-tool) for the watchmakers lathe with which the watchmakers correct the tooth-shape of damaged wheels. This tool comes with a set of profile cutters for tiny (wrist-watch) wheels. I might use it to improve the wheels I already made.

 

BTW, in Banyan's log on his VICTORIA we discussed another method involving just a lathe to cut worm-wheels (say for winches or the gear-rings for training QF guns) using a normal tap for threading as a gear-hob. The worms then are just turned down pieces of the corresponding screw. This method works so well, that people building telescope-mounts use it.

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