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captgino

Making block

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I am not sure if there is a tutorial, but I make small scale blocks by carving and shaping them on the end of a strip of boxwood. I layout the length of the block and then drill holes for the sheave with a drill bit in a pin vise. I use a variety of 4 inch jeweler's files to shape the block and details before cutting if off using a small razor saw in a hobby knife handle. The razor saw blade is shaped like a typical number 11 blade except it has saw teeth. Go slowly cutting the block off the stick. Too much pressure will send the block flying into the next dimension, never to be found. 

 

This method is much like what Harold Underhill described in Plank on Frame Models. It takes some practice, but once you get the hang of it, you can make several blocks in one sitting. Not long before you have several small jars filled with enough blocks to rig a model. 

 

Russ

block2.jpg

block4.jpg

block5.jpg

blockface.jpg

blockside.jpg

Edited by russ

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Do you have any machine tools such as a mill?  There's lots of different methods with Russ's being one of the better ones for doing it.  

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On 11/21/2018 at 7:04 PM, russ said:

I am not sure if there is a tutorial, but I make small scale blocks by carving and shaping them on the end of a strip of boxwood. I layout the length of the block and then drill holes for the sheave with a drill bit in a pin vise. I use a variety of 4 inch jeweler's files to shape the block and details before cutting if off using a small razor saw in a hobby knife handle. The razor saw blade is shaped like a typical number 11 blade except it has saw teeth. Go slowly cutting the block off the stick. Too much pressure will send the block flying into the next dimension, never to be found. 

 

This method is much like what Harold Underhill described in Plank on Frame Models. It takes some practice, but once you get the hang of it, you can make several blocks in one sitting. Not long before you have several small jars filled with enough blocks to rig a model. 

 

Russ

block2.jpg

block4.jpg

block5.jpg

blockface.jpg

blockside.jpg

This is great. It is easy to implement. I will give it a try. Thank you. 

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On 11/21/2018 at 8:10 PM, mtaylor said:

Do you have any machine tools such as a mill?  There's lots of different methods with Russ's being one of the better ones for doing it.  

No I do not have a mill but I did ask Santa 🎅. I like the technique described above. 

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On 11/22/2018 at 9:50 AM, DelF said:

This post from EdT's Young America log is a great tutorial on block making, showing what can be achieved with hand tools (and a great deal of skill!)  https://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/3453-young-america-by-edt-extreme-clipper-1853/&do=findComment&comment=534128 

 

Derek

Thank you Derek. This is perfect. Great pictures and instructions to follow. 

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EdT's method is excellent. It can, however, be further refined by the use of powered dedicated production set ups which yield perfectly shaped blocks on a "mass production" basis. This is Chuck Passaro's method of construction for his Syren Ship Models company's ready-made boxwood blocks. In deference to Chuck's "trade secrets," I'll say no more about how (I think) he does it, but I'd strongly suggest one consider clicking on his "Syren" link on the MSW forum home page and ordering what you need from him. They are perfect and very reasonably priced.

 

https://www.syrenshipmodelcompany.com/

 

 

Edited by Bob Cleek

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4 hours ago, Bob Cleek said:

EdT's method is excellent. It can, however, be further refined by the use of powered dedicated production set ups which yield perfectly shaped blocks on a "mass production" basis. This is Chuck Passaro's method of construction for his Syren Ship Models company's ready-made boxwood blocks. In deference to Chuck's "trade secrets," I'll say no more about how (I think) he does it, but I'd strongly suggest one consider clicking on his "Syren" link on the MSW forum home page and ordering what you need from him. They are perfect and very reasonably priced.

 

https://www.syrenshipmodelcompany.com/

 

 

My only source for blocks!

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 Looking at contemporary model photos, there seems to be no end to the shapes on each model, but Ed's tutorial should work well for any of them, just be careful whether your ship's blocks would have had rope strops or metal as on the more "modern" clipper.   I saw a video or series of photos quite a while ago that showed shaped cutting bits used on a mill to cut the outside shape so every block was shaped the same.   Each size block had a different cutter, but they were beautifully done.   Barring the above, I would go with Chuck's blocks.

 

Allan

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Back on old MSW there were some Russian guys who made some simple single-lip milling cutters from hardened silver-steel/drill rod or HSS toolbits and shape-milled with them the main oulines of blocks on the PROXXON FM50. Not too difficult to make such cutters.

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I wasn’t happy with the kit-supplied double blocks for my Model Shipways Niagara model. The kit supplies only two sizes of double blocks and apparently this is ok for most of the rig but the big sheet blocks on the main required bigger than the kit allowed for. There would be only two needed so I made them by laminating stripwood.

0F4AE243-1876-477E-BDA7-39852064DEB6.jpeg

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2 hours ago, woodeater said:

I recommend to everybody use "cumier"-wood for making blocks..

2 hours ago, woodeater said:

Sheave inside - is of backaut

Hello Woodeater

 

Great blocks, but I can't find translations of cumier-wood and backaut - do you know the english words?

 

Derek

 

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1 hour ago, DelF said:

Great blocks, but I can't find translations of cumier-wood and backaut - do you know the english words?

Appears to be called Manilkara or Bulletwood. Here is one store in Canada offering it and it's not terribly expensive. Domex in the US claims to carry it but the photos looked very different.

Edited by vossiewulf

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33 minutes ago, vossiewulf said:

Great blocks, but I can't find translations of cumier-wood and backaut - do you know the english words?

If I am not mistaken it's Sapele wood commonly found in some kits for planking.:)

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John!

It is Manilcara Celebrica(Island Celebes, Indonesia) 

Wefalck! 

 The only reason to use this rather reddish wood - I burst into love with this colour!

And the blocks were actually made with the help of MF 70 (Proxxon) and small hand instruments

IMG_1136.JPG

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