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Jim Lad

Now I Feel Old

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When visiting the South Australian Maritime Museum last month I came across this builder's plate, which is from one of my old ships - the 'Mundoora'.

 

1067649837_104836-BuildersPlatePortAdelaide.thumb.JPG.7da8659b38c27ffad297a6de5b8846d5.JPG

 

I was only on the 'Mundoora' briefly, but how could the builder's plate from a ship on which I had served be old enough to be in a museum? How could it be there at all - the 'Mundoora' was sold to Maldivian interests in 1975 and foundered in 1984 while en route from Aquaba to Calcutta with a cargo of phosphate - so how did the builder's plate survive?.

 

Here is 'Mundoora' as she was when I was on her - a very old and faded photo showing her in Associated Steamships colours.

 

1827428868_130-MVMundoora.thumb.jpg.bdc6962828f8fd0cf16b22402b207eff.jpg

 

John

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That makes you feel old? About 30 years ago I visited the Railway Museum in York , England. In a glass case was an 0-gauge Hornby train set. It was identical to the set I played with as a child. 

 

On a more serious note, the question of how the builder's plate ended up in the museum is a good one, if the ship had foundered.

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You are not old Jim, just vintage!

 

I feel the same way when I realize that the aircraft I spent so many hours in while in the service only exists anymore as museum displays. Almost none of them are still flying. A few months ago I did get to hear one flying by. The sound is unmistakable and I had to stop and look as it flew buy. 

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My kids don't move without their cellphones but still won't answer it if you call them using the "talk" feature. I on the other hand prove my ancient origins by not using the text feature and half the time I have no idea where it even is!

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Around 17 years ago I visited the RAF museum at Hendon and there it was on display. One of my old (8 squadron RAF) Hunters which I'd worked on in the 1960's in the middle east. That certainly made me think :o migod. 

 

Cathead,I've still not got one and I'm twice your age. Can't think of any reason to have one either. 

 

Dave :dancetl6:

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Mine's barely a proper cell, has no contract just a prepaid card for emergencies. It's most a smart device that does have various sensible uses, it's the connectivity I avoid like the plague (no texting or calls, just a handheld computer).

 

My other metric for recognizing age, as an American, is meeting young adults who were born after 9/11.

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I don’t own a cell phone smart or otherwise so this does not figure into the feel old equation.  

 

In 1966 as a newly minted U S Navy ensign I received orders to report to the Naval Reactors Branch of the Atomic Energy Comission.  Upon reporting I was assigned to a fluids system section handling problems for a group of operating submarines.  My particular responsibility included USS Nautilus then completing a lengthy overhaul.  Upon completion of the overhaul Nautilus returned to sea as an active element of the US Submarine force.

 

Nautilus has been moored as a museum ship at the US Navy Submarine Force Museum near Groton, CT for at least 25 years and that makes me feel old.

 

Roger

 

 

 

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Popeye, she went down in the Arabian Sea, a couple of hundred miles from the nearest land.  Perhaps the brass builder's plate detached itself and floated home to Australia - or perhaps someone unscrewed it when she was sold by Associated Steamships! 😁

 

John

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21 hours ago, Jim Lad said:

How could it be there at all - the 'Mundoora' was sold to Maldivian interests in 1975 and foundered in 1984 while en route from Aquaba to Calcutta with a cargo of phosphate - so how did the builder's plate survive?.

There were a few AB's around then that were very good at collecting for the SA museum, I remember we carried quite a bit of unofficial cargo that was headed that way, often forwarded via 3 or 4 ships to get there. I very much doubt that plate ever left the Aussie coast in '75.

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20 hours ago, Roger Pellett said:

me feel old

We lived in Groton my father was an instructor at the USCG Academy he took me to the launching I think I was 6, I feel older than you but thanks for the posting a nice memory!

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Well if we're going to go down the "old" path, I am the bloke that kept the "red rattlers" going on Sydney lines longer than anyone wanted, the burned out armatures were smuggled out of the workshop and sent to Bathurst where I rewound them before they were smuggled back in under the guise of "Look what we found"!!

 

1677052494_Redrattler.jpg.26feace0d10cc1a49aa3f5c49c909f25.jpg

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6 hours ago, Jim Lad said:

Aha! So you're the bloke who caused me all those stinking hot train trips home! :Whew::)

 

John

Guilty as charged my friend but hey, what good is a union black ban if you can't sneak around it?

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