jre8655

Allergic Reaction to Super Glue - moved by moderator

I believe I have encountered a very unpleasent reaction to super glue and was wondering if anyone else has experienced the same.

 

After working with super glue my sinuses will react in such a way as to lead to difficult breathing.  Anyone who suffers from allergic reactions to dust and pollen can relate to this sinus problem.  In fact I do suffer from allergies and take a form of Zertec for it.

 

The reason I believe this is from super glue is because this is the third time this has happened to me during the course of building a model.  I make sure I have plenty of ventilation, but it doesn't seem to matter.  Within four to six hours of working with the super glue I begin to experience the reaction.

 

Anyone else have this problem?

 

I may not be able to continue using super glue for securing rigging, small parts, ect.  As far as securing knots in rigging I've read where some modelers use a thinned white glue.  It takes a little longer, but it seems to work for them.

 

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Yep, join the crowd. Use as little as possible and only when necessary, make sure to have plenty of ventilation. Like the old days, Load up on a variety of rubber-bands, and clamps like clothespins or the new clamps the secretaries use. Those little black ones.

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As far as rigging glue, I've seen GS Hypo Cement by Beadalon suggested a couple places (by Ferit/ashiponthehorizon for one). Can't recall which topic. Said to dry in 15(?) minutes and is flexible, not stiff like CA.

 

Brian

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Jack,

 

There's been some discussion of this problem, among others with CA.  Use it only in a well-ventilated area.  The biggest problem is CA (and the fumes) 'love' water.  You breathe in  the fumes and the CA bonds with the moisture in your sinuses and lungs. 

 

Here's two good discussions of glues:  http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/1894-glue-recommendations/?hl=allergy#entry44000  & http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/943-gluing-techniques-and-associated-information/?hl=allergy

 

The second one has some specifics to the problem you're having.

 

BTW, some of us learned that water is a great accelerant for CA.  :)

augie likes this

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I was diagnosed with chronic sinusitits late last year, and about two weeks ago had an episode of breathing difficulty. I had no idea super glue could cause problems like this.

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Cyano acrylates are nasty :( . Unlike other glues we use with the exception of epoxies they don't "dry" they chemically react.Virtually all of the packaging says don't inhale it. 

 

One suggestion, other than switching glues, is to go to a hardware shop and buy a face mask with a canister for adsorbing solvent vapors. I have one I use when I use enamel paints and it works also for me for super glue fumes. People's chemical reactions are different so run a controlled test (short session) to see if it works for you. Water is an accelerant for cyano acrylates which is why they stick your fingers together so quickly ^_^  when you get some on you.

 

Bottom line read labels and take proper safety precautions :) . Go online to the manufactuers website and read their MSDS info (material safety data sheet) if you don't think you have enough info.

Jaxboat

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I have a small desk fan on a shelf at the back of my workbench set to blow across the workbench and always turn it on when using C/A.  I never get even a whiff of the fumes with the fan running.  I tend to use the fan whenever I am at the workbench as I use halogen lights for good illumination and they are hot.  The fan keeps air moving and I never notice  heat from the lights - if I do it's because I forgot to turn on the fan.  The fan also keeps soldering fumes from being inhaled.

Kurt

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Brian;  I see where GS Hypo Cement is available from both Amazon and Michael's.  Since we have a Michael's about 3 miles from us I can pop over there tomorrow and pick some up.

 

Jaxboat;  great suggestion with the respirator.  That may be something I should invest in for any number of reasons besides the glue fume issue.

 

Thank you all.

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white glue / carpenter's glue can also be used right out of the bottle.  if used sparingly,  it dries right into the rigging and disappears without a trace......almost like our friend here:   :ph34r:

avsjerome2003 likes this

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It makes me feel ill after using the stuff, but there is no alternative for a fast grabbing glue. 

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Yes agree with you John.  Titebond wood glue and clamps is the best way to go.

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If i use it for a prolonged period of time I start to sneeze!I use Franklin Titebond on my wooden ships and that does not cause any problems!

avsjerome2003 likes this

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Jack (and others).   I went to a large box store sports outlet and picked up some "fly head" glue.

As it sounds it is used in making flies for fishing and gluing the seizing of the head to the hook.

I understand it is hypoallergenic, Has little or no odor and sets fairly quickly.  And remains flexible.

 

there are other such adhesive out there, some in hobby/craft centers in the beading area.

 

No use using CA if it affects you in any way.

oxiciewmected likes this

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Boy!  I tell you what!  I'm ready to try anything to get away from CA!

 

This last reaction has now gone on for two days.  I'm just now beginning to breath through my nostrils again.  My wife was ready to take me to hospital, she was that concerned about my breathing.  It is subsiding, but slowly.

 

Since both Hydro Cement and Fly Head Cement are available through Amazon I'm going to order a tube of both and see which one is best for my application.

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I've found that I can speed up the 'initial hold' on Titebond by applying the glue, match the pieces and touch together to spread the glue, then seperate the pieces for a short period of time and re-attach. It seems that the initial hold is much sturdier that way.

Ed

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Jack, I feel your pain. I have been there as well, took almost an entire week for the last of the miserable symptoms to subside, but the first 48 hours were the worst!  I have not invested in a paint respirator, but I have limited the use of my CA to just a couple of instances that I can't seem to avoid it. I now use the fan to blow the fumes away from me, plus I keep my face away from the fresh wet glue. If I know I am going to be using it for more than just a minute or two, I have taken the parts outdoors and stayed up wind of the fumes while applying the needed fix.  I know once that first sneeze comes on, I am pretty much screwed and am already in the beginning of a reaction to the nasty stuff.

I really need to get on Amazon and order this other stuff, sounds like it will make life less painful.

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I rarely use the stuff, maybe 1% of my gluing is CA, as I would rather use wood glue and a clamp any day but when I must use it I basically work quick and avoid breathing the fumes... fans, work outdoors etc. I haven't had the same kind of reaction as you but more of a momentary breathlessness... still an uncomfortable time and an indicator of something ain't right here :huh: .

I used some on rigging line knots (I've since ripped them out and started that over... for many reasons) but I now use a flat lacquer that dries on the knot and becomes fairly invisible. Stays more flexible too.

The stuff is effective but not worth the risk if you're allergic and there are alternatives.

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I will add my suffering to the thread. If I use any C.A. glue indoors, I will have flu-like symptoms for almost 48 hours. If I am quick about it and outside I can usually get off with a much lesser effect. 

 

I try to avoid it in my builds, but when you need that instant grab, nothing compares. 

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I use this glue with wearing a paper dust mask but the fumes still irritate my eyes in a confined place.  I think a full face respirator like spray painters use could work. 

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I got a bad reaction after I used quiet a bit with the paper model. since then I always use a dust mask and use as little as possible , basically only if I need to glue brass parts to wood. but I am looking for an alternative because with those small brass bits to hold them I usually and up with the bit on my fingers instead of the ship. really don't like CA

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I built my first two wooden ships (Victory and Endeavour) without using any CA glue, I used mainly PVA wood glue and epoxy for metal parts. So if the CA is affecting your health don't use it, you don't need it. My main problem building the Victory was that when I sanded the walnut parts the dust would make me sneeze like hell.

Steve

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I guess even epoxy glue has fumes and sandpapering mdf particleboard is poisonous to your health. 

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