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rafine

Frigate Essex by Rafine - FINISHED - Model Shipways - Kitbashed

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Hey Bob, I've got a whole pile of broken drill bits I still use!

 

-Bug

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Moving ahead at a faster pace caused by unusual weather (13" of rain that caused local flooding that pretty much trapped us in our house for a couple of days), the first copper has been applied to the hull.

 

After some experimenting , I decided to try something a little different. Rather than cutting the copper tape into individual plates, I chose to apply the tape in long strips (two or three for the length of the hull). I then burnished the strips with a piece of stripwood and then scribed in the plate division lines. The last step is to use a stamp made of a piece of wood with headless nails to simulate the plate nailing pattern. Because of the scale, I didn't attempt to to do the actual pattern, but like so many other things on the build, used a pattern that seemed to look "right". There is a slight overlap of the tape strips.

 

I found it very hard to take decent photos of the copper because of the glare and reflection and apologize for the quality of  those attached. Now it's back to applying what seems to be an endless expanse of copper.

 

Bob

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Edited by rafine

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Bob

 

Looks great! As with the proto-type and to be honest ALL BUILDS out here a historically correct nail pattern is virtually impossible to replicate correctly.  It's the appearance of a pattern on the copper that we're striving for.

 

To knock the sheen down I used a single coat of spray on Testor's Dull Coat.

 

Let me know when the package gets to you

 

Sam

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Hi Bob, That’s a unique way of doing the copper. It looks really good and if you find it easier

then all is good. Now if we got 13” of rain up here everything on the hills would wash into the

valleys and the water wouldn’t recede for months! I hope all is well with you and extra model

time was the only “issue”. :) 

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Overlap looks perfect.  Let me go get my sunglasses.

 

Never used Dullcoat over copper.  Be interested to see if you decide to go that route.

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That looks really nice Sam.  The only question I'd have is will the dullcoat keep the copper from darkening over time?  I coppered my Syren with the tape about 2 years back and she's finally starting to darken on her own and most of the shine has dulled ..... she originally looked like a showroom new '57 Buick.

 

Let's see where Bob takes his.

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Thanks very much guys. It is my intention to use a coat of flat finish on the copper when I'm done. I've used Pollyscale flat finish for this in the past, including on Syren, and been pleased with the result. Even with the finish coat, the copper seems to age nicely with time.

 

Rusty, we were lucky to have no damage, just inconvenience. The golf course wasn't as fortunate, leaving me with continuing added modeling time.

 

Bob

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Augie,

 

The copper continued to patina a bit naturally but not as much as I think it would if left untreated. Also i think it is more even in color. The key is still to avoid prolonged hand contact (oils). That will darken it regardless from my experience.

 

Sam

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I am really enjoying this build and am glad you have been able to work through many of the issues for this kit.  Learned a lot.

 

Scott

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beautiful work Bob....we got 9-10 inches up here in Stuart.  Fortunately, just had a section of the roof redone, and it didn't leak.

 

Our courses opened today.  Let's see; if that was rain was snow up north, we'd be buried.

 

 

got plenty done on the ECB while the deluge fell.

 

Terry

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Bob,

 

I forgot to ask, what did you use to scribe in the plate division lines? Also how did you keep spacing/plate size consistent?

 

With the tape being thin (although I found it pretty resilient) did you tear any?

 

It's producing a very nice finish and I am considering using it on my current build.

 

Also it beats cutting the 1,000 or so individual plates I stuck on ESSEX!..................

 

Sam

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Thanks Scott sand Terry.

 

Sam, I'm very pleased with the method. It is much quicker and easier than the individual plates and I don't see any real difference in result. I 've had no problem with tearing, but you do have to be careful about twisting when the strips are long. I try not to remove too much backing at one time to avoid that. The scribing is being done with an awl-like tool (center punch?) that has a dull point, but I'm sure that the back of a knife would work as well. The plate size is controlled by use of a spacer block, but you could really just eye the center of the plate above for reference if you wished. Try it out on some scrap and see what you think.

 

Bob

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Thanks Bob,

 

I'm going to practice a bit and then give it a try on my latest project. 

 

Bob, I'm certain you know this but I'll throw it out here for anyone else reading that may not - once last "thought" on the use of clear /dull coat on the copper. One coat is really all that should be used I've found. The liquid (either spray or brush on) is actually sitting on top of the copper tape. There's little (or no) absorption so more than one coat is just building up the product on top of itself and can lead to a very muddy appearence that isn't very natural looking. 

 

Sam

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After some minor cursing and a small change of method, I've completed the first side of the copper. The change was to go, as much as possible, to one continuous strip of copper tape for each row, rather than piecing two or three pieces together. This took a little more care to avoid twisting the strips, but ended up taking less time and looking neater.

 

While I'm generally pleased with the look of this side, I have no doubt that the refinement of method, and the practice that I've had, will make the second side easier and better. I will take a day or two off from the copper, however, because I am a little bleary-eyed from looking at it for a week. Now that my Brass Black has arrived, I think that I'll do some eyebolts and ringbolts for a bit.

 

Bob

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Edited by rafine

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Bob,

 

Looks great!

 

Just think if those were individual plates?!

 

I was hallucinating (lol) by time I finished the hundreds of pieces I put on...............

 

Sam

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All "dulling clears" contain a flatting agent which is adhered to the substrate with a resin of some sort. If you put too many coats on you will begin to notice the build up of he flatting agents and the beginning of opacity. Sam is right: one coat and done. Your coppering looks awesome, Bob!

Best

Jaxboat B)

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Beautiful work!

 

Before applying the copper tape, did you do any prep. to the wood planks to help with adhesion?

Would wearing examination gloves help when coppering or make it too difficult?

 

Ken

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Thanks for all the nice comments and the "likes".

 

Sam, I did think about all those individual plates. That's why I decided to try something different.

 

Ken, I've seen others who have used a sealer of one kind or another, but I've used copper tape without it successfully in the past and didn't use any here. So far, so good. As to the gloves, I've thought about them, but never tried. They might be a good idea. I'd be curious what others think.

 

Bob

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First rate work, Bob.

 

I thought about the gloves as well Bob.  But when I was finished I just wiped here down with IPA (91%).  After 2 years there is just a slow darkening with no uneven spots or fingerprints at all.

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Augie

 

Great minds think alike!  I wiped mine down as well. The key (I think) is not to saturate the plates with IPA. Too much can degrade the adhesive. And before sealing (if that's next, let them air dry for a day (or two)

 

Sam

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Yes, you don't want the plates floating off in the current.  I am going to try that one coat of dullcoat on the next coppered one though....that will be a while off.

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Nice work Bob, and great input from everyone. I'm sure glad you guys are all ironing out the bumps for me before I get to a coppering job!

 

- Bug

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Thanks Sam, Augie and Bug for your comments and input and a continuing thanks to the "likes". I had previously done some experimenting with alcohol on test pieces and can attest that care needs to be taken if you choose to wipe the copper down with it. I haven't decided yet.

 

Bob

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