EdT

Young America by EdT - extreme clipper 1853

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I guess what I mean is you are dealing with 2 separate fixed fixtures...one at each end of the futtock shroud...so.. for you to attach it with any tension..you had to open and re-close a copper hook and then adjust its tension...otherwise you would be left with shrouds that barely allow connection and then they will slump because the hook tip is longer then the body of the hook.  Do you understand what I mean?

 

Your shrouds are tight...what did you do to tighten them?

 

Rob(Thanks for all the other info...)

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Rob, as I said in the last post, the shrouds are given an initial tension - after hooking - by the lashings at the mast.  These lashings consist of 6 turns of small rope that allow the shroud to be pulled straight when they are hauled up.  the lashings are then secured by wrapping the rope around the turns and securing it.  Although visibly straight at this stage the futtock shrouds will not be put under tension until the topmast shrouds are tensioned and secured using their deadeye lanyards.  The deadeye straps have a sliding connection at the rim of the top so that this tension can be applied from the topmast head to the lower mast eyes through each futtock and shroud.  If either shroud were fixed at the top, that light structure would be subject to failure from bending forces at the rim.  With the sliding connection at the rim the top cross trees are only subject to horizontal compression.  Clear?   

 

Ed

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Yep...thank you...It wasn't clear initially, that you were going to use the top mast deadeye lanyards to actually tighten the futtock shrouds(As I would assume was accomplished in reality)

 

Rob

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Upon further investigation It has become clear to me that you (Lashed) the futtock shrouds at the mast band.  I assumed they were secured in similar fashion as to the top deadeye loop band.

Apparently not.

 

Thanks for the clarity.

 

Rob

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Young America - extreme clipper 1853
Part 200 – Lower Masts Continued

 

It is hard to believe we are at the 200th post on Young America – almost 3 ½ years into the project.  Still as exciting as ever – for me at least.

 

Since beginning work on the lower masts, most of the reporting has been on the fore mast – the guinea pig for construction, finishing and rigging – and only one version in the scrap box.  However, though mostly unseen, work has been proceeding on the other two, so here are a few pics.  The first is the most recent, taken yesterday and showing the main mast ready for fitting the deadeyes and rigging the futtock shrouds. 

 

58bc0fac4fdec_YA20001.jpg.4e2ac2ecdebe80f773fe5e95722f8073.jpg

 

The mizzen mast to the left is almost to the same state, but needs its masthead detailing.  The next picture shows the main top before fitting the deadeyes.

 

58bc0facdaf24_YA20002.jpg.6c2f85fab9c64b03259a4d729aee9c4a.jpg

 

At 18' 6" in breadth, this is somewhat larger than the 17' fore top.  The "pre-rigging on this top includes a pair of brace blocks for the mizzen lower yard, the crojack.  These may be seen dangling from shackles below the aft crosstree.  Because of the soldered shackles, any shackled connections, including eyebolts, need to be either fitted with their blocks or left off until later.

 

The next picture shows the forward chafing batten being glued to the mizzen mast.

 

58bc0fad46b58_YA20003.jpg.921c17b216fc7430263d3cf6e7b62e35.jpg

 

The batten is concave on the mast face and was rounded on the forward face after gluing.  The top, with the 9" diameter spanker mast inserted, is to the lower left.  The below-deck rings have been blackened and the ring of wedges is in place.  After this step the above deck ironwork was buffed with a clean wheel and blackened as shown in the next picture.

 

58bc0fada5e36_YA20004.jpg.056eeb48d7e8c70db30a5c1707db82e8.jpg

 

The sanding stick in the picture was used to clean the glue off the batten's nail heads (not shown).  The next picture shows the mizzen at this stage.

 

58bc0fae051e1_YA20005.jpg.a4d8b57b35c3e35a944fd30879cec418.jpg

 

The top and the spanker mast are permanently attached in this picture.  The picture also shows small brail blocks hanging from the mast.  These will be discussed later.

 

By this time, the foremast was complete and could, if desired, be permanently installed.  The last picture its base with a mast coat fitted over the wedges.

 

58bc0fae6cbc0_YA20006.jpg.f3fcd1d4d429784c6d5fd3adde50b0ef.jpg

 

The mast coat simulates a tarred canvas cover with surrounding rope to pull it tight at the mast and at the base.  It would also have been nailed before tarring.   I could find no standard method for these – only brief and varied descriptions.

 

Ed

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Beautifully executed so far. Ed in the last post you had mentioned that a description of the mast covering would be explained. It looks like wrinkled canvas from this height, but are you keeping how you made it a secret......I have my own thoughts about how you made it, which are likely different from what you did.

We are a vigilant lot sir!

Michael

 

 

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3 1/2 years!? Seems like yesterday you were just finishing up the Naiad frigate and pondering your next project. Time truly does accelerate the older you get. Bummed, but in great admiration of your masts and model in general.

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Thanks, everyone.  I really appreciate the comments.

 

No secrets, Micheal.  I'll include a picture or two in the next post, when I do the coat for the main mast.  Basically just tissue, paper, some rope, glue and some tar (ie black artist acrylic).

 

Maury, the short answer is I do not know the specific reason for cabins.  I might speculate that rope would be subject to constant rubbing and potential failure as these 30' boats shifted back and forth.  These ships were equipped for the Cape.  As to the reference, I undoubtedly saw this in a photo and it stuck.  If I come across it I will report.

 

Greg, I had in my mind that it was 2 1/2 years.  It actually feels like about 1 1/2.  Question is, how many more will it take?

 

Ed 

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1 hour ago, EdT said:

No secrets, Micheal.

I know, I was just kidding, but you knew that. I do look forward to seeing how you did it though.

 

Michael

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You take model ship building to a whole new level Ed.   I am totally in awe of the skills and detail your work shows  - quite simply inspirational.

 

Thank you.

 

Graham

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Young America - extreme clipper 1853
Part 201 – Lower Mast Coats

 

When I decided to wedge the masts with pieced wedges, it was clear that some sort of mast coats would be required to cover the openings between wedges – not to keep out water as in real life practice, but to simulate the real coats and to improve the appearance at the bases of the masts.

 

Apart from terse descriptions, there was not a lot to go on in making these.  My usual search through photos gave some ideas, but ultimately the solution came from the question, "What would I do to make a watertight canvas 'flashing' over the mast wedges?"  I am comforted by the thought that many ships' carpenters asked similar questions – and came up with a variety of solutions - as the few pictures I have seen illustrate.

 

The canvas for the model coats is tissue and in the first picture a strip of this is being wound around the glue-coated main mast and its wedging.

 

58bd8f720c1e8_YA20101.jpg.0e89ff90bd9eff3e15cfebe45e6eabb9.jpg

 

Several strips were used with plenty of glue and not too much effort to smooth out the result.  Canvas would most definitely have wrinkles when forced into the required shape.  The next picture shows rope being tied around the top to clinch it tightly around the mast.

 

58bd8f72af05b_YA20102.jpg.68a34f39045ca3e6a5a10866fa9005a8.jpg

 

In practice the coat would have been caulked and tacked around the mast and deck, but rope cinches would keep it from tearing out from the nails and risking damage to the high-value cargo these ships often carried.

 

At the bottom, a flange was simulated using card and fitted around the mast at the base as shown in the next picture.

 

58bd8f7318b5a_YA20103.jpg.94f5b8bd2035a5e7981fb318dc85a936.jpg

 

When this was glued in place and allowed to dry, a second rope cinch was added at the base.  The next picture shows the coat being "tarred" with fairly thick, dark grey, artists' acrylic paint,

 

58bd8f737acec_YA20104.jpg.90d681e6ee8bcd7144a908ba7caaabbf.jpg

 

After drying the coat was brushed with black, thinned, acrylic wash to highlight the wrinkles in the canvas and the ropes as shown below.

 

58bd8f73e6bab_YA20105.jpg.b7f63ebe99b5cfaf567602e13fa91ef6.jpg

 

Those that have been following the project will note that the glistening brass pump wheels, by now well tarnished and lacking their original appeal, have been painted.  Next job for the painters, the equally tarnished poop monkey rail.

 

Other true followers may also notice in the picture that I have finally gotten around to adding the central posts to the fore and aft fife rails that were previously omitted.

 

 

Ed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ed...as I've said it before...you are my example...and going before me...you lay down the standard and give the teachers example to follow.^_^

 

Rob

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Bob,

 

I have found that copper can be blackened with LOS without effecting surrounding wood.  The wood needs to be clean of any metal sanding dust and the LOS needs to be fairly dilute.  When leveling off boltheads, files produce less fine dust than sanding but the surface should be wiped clean before treating.  LOS solutions seem to neutralize to water and inert white solids and leave no reactive residues, unlike salt based blackeners like the blue selenium based solutions.  You may also wish to rinse with clean water.  While I have found this to be the case, some testing is always worthwhile to understand the right LOS dilution as well as the need for pre-cleaning.

 

Ed

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Ed,

 

Got it.  Made several concentrations in an attempt to find a workable minimum.  Somewhere between 40 & 50:1 got the job done and left no residual staining.  Moving on to the common planking.

 

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Thanks, E&T and others for the likes,

 

Bob, you are more scientific than I am.  I put about 1/8" of water in a small plastic bathroom cup, dip a small brush in LOS gel, and then stir it around in the cup, then use it immediately - either brushing it on or dropping small parts into the cup.    Color of the clear solution is my measure - not too dark.

 

Ed.  

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Young America - extreme clipper 1853
Part 202 – More of the same - Tops

 

Seeing pictures of Young America's tops may be getting tedious, but repetition is the soul of ship modeling, so I will show some more.  There is not much else to do at this stage.  First are the six mizzen top deadeyes, almost ready to be installed.

 

58cd37da2b4ca_YA20201.jpg.066236440eb43a290b089c4aa6e066bf.jpg 

 

These are 8" (~.11" in diameter) – not the smallest.  There are some 6".  These were dyed, finished with Tung oil, and then drilled.  This keeps the heavy soak in oil from clogging holes.  In the picture they have just dried after dipping in LOS with their straps attached.  They will get a light buffing with Tung before being fitted.  I've tried different sequences.  This seems to be the best.

 

The next picture shows these - after some more finishing - installed in the rim of the top.

 

58cd37dc023b7_YA20202.thumb.jpg.2c94133c2d1b086d2656c43b2f52d700.jpg

 

The top and mast head have been trimmed out with bands, eyebolts, topmast fid plates, and chafing battens.  The next picture is a view from astern.

 

58cd37dc7fd8e_YA20203.jpg.0bdfbc3d2515747d1bf8b775586f6051.jpg 

 

And finally, the full lower mast from above.

 

58cd37dd05afc_YA20204.jpg.dd0469fac8f7fc5674e8f9acaca2fd05.jpg 

 

The next picture shows the foretop with the roughed-out mast cap fitted. 

 

58cd37dd7a0e3_YA20205.jpg.8154f4d476ef91dac078eeb778343ee4.jpg 

 

These are coming up on the agenda.  They have some interesting ironwork for the lower topsail yard fittings and for the lower yard topping lift block fastenings.

 

All is at a bit of a standstill however, as the shipyard has become a woodworking shop for a few days as may be seen below.

 

58cd37de1c9c7_YA20206.thumb.jpg.145c3d364a8f4aad93671543631d193f.jpg

 

These are the frames for the dust case mentioned in an earlier post.  It will also serve as an ever-present photo background for the rigging work.  Its turning into one of those projects that lasts, because of trying to do it on the cheap.  The wood is scrap from my collection – not a problem – but the plan was to use less expensive photo background paper over it, instead of the foam board I used on Victory – until one newly papered frame got punctured leaning against a not-too-sharp corner and a floor broom tipped over and fell through one.  Foam board is on order ($50).  Stay tuned.

 

 

Ed

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