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mtaylor   

If you're having questions about planking, a good place to start is here: http://modelshipworldforum.com/ship-model-framing-and-planking-articles.php

 

In addition to the tutorial by David Antscherl, there's also several others including "how to's" on planking bluff bows, the Simplified Planking for Beginners and also one from Chuck Passaro.

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Long9Ron   

Thanks Mark and Chuck for reminding me to do my research on deck planking before I attempt it on my Cross Section. Quickly glanced at them for now. They look very informative and I will make a point of reading them first. 

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texxn5   

Looks like I found this one just in time since I see this subject coming up very soon....Thanks Chuck, greatly appreciated.

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mtaylor   

Treenails are, shall we say, a bit of much discussion.  On the real thing, the holes were drilled, the treenails set and then a plug of the same wood as the deck was put in to cover the treenail.  For the most part, they're pretty darn invisible.  BUT..  we modelers like to show them off. 

 

You could use a very sharp #2 pencil for the impression of a treenail by doing it just before putting on the finish.  The pin and colored filler seems popular.  Or use the #80 drill and draw some treenails down to that size.  Some also use a hyperdermic needle to leave the impression of the plug.

 

The final alternative is just to not do treenails since anything smaller than 1:64 is pretty darn small.

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allanyed   

Doc,

My experience with "old" dental burrs is not that good.  They are worn from working on enamel and do not cut very well, even in wood, when compared to new ones.  For what my dentist charges, I did not feel guilty in the least when he offered a handful of brand new burrs after I politely declined used ones. 

 

In addition, with more than one coarseness available in carving burrs, one can work fast and rough, then follow up with finishing before going to sandpaper and Scotchpads. 

 

Allan

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Jparsley   

Ok guys question I know the importance of planking both sides evenly as far as one side then the next then back again one plank at a time The question is on the second layer of planking does that have to be followed or can one side be completed then the other since it isn't a structure issue but more of a veneer

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hornet   

You are right, it isn't a structural issue. However, if you shape your planks in pairs ( port and starboard) you will be much more likely to achieve a result which looks symmetrical and even - especially at the bow.

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Thanks both. Paul, it looks like a paid membership is the only way to download the document although it seems it can be readily reviewed online and Tony I am not sure where the article is buried in the rest. In either case as I had mentioned, I printed the article when it was available with NRG. I suppose it must be a copyrighted article now. Nevertheless both links are valuable references.

Ian

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trippwj   

Mark, if you are monitoring this thread, I am looking for a link that used to work (because I downloaded a paper copy several months ago, but would like to refer it to someone) - which I believe you posted on some other thread (http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/353-planking-instructiontutorial-by-jack-nastyface/) - but it doesn't seem to work anymore. The article was called "planking a hull - a tutorial", by Keith Harris (jack nastyface). Searching the site doesn't seem to get me any further. I found it to be an excellent article on spiling. Apologies if I am overlooking something.

Ian

 

I have reposted the tutorial at the following link on MSW:

 

http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/12119-planking-tutorial-by-jack-nastyface/?p=367116

 

It was created in partnership with Keith, and used by permission.

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I am looking for recommendations for completing my planking process. I have planked the hull of my Niagra (successfully, whew, first POB), and I have been sanding for a smooth finished surface. But, there still remain small cracks between planks in many places, usually caused by the slight irregularities in the manufacture of the wood. I plan to paint the hull, but I need to seal these first. I have tried diluted DAP Plastic Wood, but it is to coarse to do a good job. 

What do the experts recommend for this job. There must be some simple way, some commonly available wood filler which works best on cracks. So, how do I best repair gaps in seams?

Thanks in advance...

Edited by milosmail
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RussR   

I am no expert but, what works for me is a product by 3M "wood filler". I got it at Lowes home improvement. It is sandable and stainable. It comes in different sizes. I would recomend the larger size because the smaller size only has 1.3oz. and the next size up has 4.0oz, (over 3 times as much as the small size) for about twice as much price.

 

Link:

https://www.lowes.com/pd/3M-Wood-Filler-Stainable/999926292

post-25634-0-05631900-1479181280_thumb.jpg

 

Russ

 

 

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tlevine   

Since you are planning on painting the hull you have several options.  You can use an epoxy crack filler (like Bondo).  You can use a wood filler.  I have never used DAP but have had good luck with the Elmer's product line.  It is going to be coarser than wood unless you keep using finer sandpaper to smooth it over.  Typically I will sand down to 400 grit.  Finally, you can make a paste of sawdust and dilute white glue and use it like Spackle to fill in the cracks.

 

For your next model consider slightly tapering the plank edge to compensate for the convexity of the hull.  That elimates a lot of those unsightly gaps.  As they say...been there, done that.

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3M woodfiller seems to work the best for me, as I can force it into small cracks with my finger. Bondo would leave a smooth surface, with no detail. I would like to leave a hint of planking after hull is sprayed. 

By the way, DAP dries too fast to manipulate, even when diluted with acetone. 

Yes, I did bevel planks where the frames turned sharply, but irregularities in planking stock have caused the bulk of the problems. This kit is 20 years old, and perhaps newer ones have higher quality machined planks. I can see why some of you make your own planks as a result.

 

On to finishing some details on the hull, priming, and then set it aside for a while to work on deck and ships boats. 

I thought I would try making the deck in a similar fashion referenced elsewhere. I will make a template, cut out a piece of 1/64 birch for a substrate, cut out the nibbling strakes, make sure fit is good, and then plank that. At least that is the plan.  :P

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Between Dirk De Bakker & Greg Brooker piece and Chuck Passaro's seminal "planning" system, a true treasure trove of info.

There is one piece I dont think is covered, or it if is it didn't click with me, but what are the methods, wisdoms, or guidelines as far as deciding where to stop the garbord? There are plenty of warnings about not putting it too far forward, but how does one figure out exactly where it should end at the stem/bow?
 

Edited by Sunsanvil
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mtaylor   

The easiest way is to lay the garboard into position, and then lay the next plank such that it runs well forward of the garboard (don't glue any planks yet).  Then draw a line using the second (top) plank as a guide on the garboard.  The garboard should end just as the stem starts curving upward.

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Janet B,

           I have tried many methods to bend planks and not to bad.All this changed when i purchased a pair of Plank Bending Pliers from EXPO TOOLS,The plier has a flat anvil

           on the one side and a vee shaped jaw on the other side which has been slightly rounded off.I found in use i could form a plank the complete lenght of the hull and because

           one side of the plier does not cut the wood but leaves a indentation it is easy to adjust,you can just ease the bend a small amount  to get a curved strip.

           Website is www.expotools.com.

 

                                                                Regards Janet B

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Tjdarla2   

Just sitting here doing some morning reading and looking over plank bending tutorial. I'm honored to see my steam pot method with hose clamps. 😀 From 2010 when I started the Santa Ana. Brought back some good memories with the struggle I had trying to bend that wood for stern and bow. 

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