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Hi, I'm getting really frustrated. I watched a brilliant planking video tutorial by David Antscherl (I think). For the life of me, I can't find it again.

Would some kind member please post a hot link for the video before I go completely bonkers!

I know it would be a lot of work for someone, but it would make life much easier if there was a proper dedicated index of such video's on the forum somewhere.

I've just wasted 3 days trying to find what I'm searching for, without success. I retain a good head of  hair, but am slowly pulling it out in despair!

Thank you.

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The Antscherl tutorial is not a video but a photo-illustrated essay. That's why you can't find it! Scroll down and you'll find it on the url OrLiN has given (above).

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Grateful to you guys for your quick reply's.

Thanks to  OrLiN; I do have the Underhill books somewhere, just have to dig them out.

Thanks to 'druxey'. Yes, I found your photo essay this morning. Tremendous stuff.

Clearly I don't know who's video I saw and can't find again. For anyone who may have seen it; the demo begins at the garboard. Each subsequent strake is fitted after a brief soak in water, clamped overnight, by which time the curvature had set and dried ready for gluing.

What astonished me was there was no need for any steelers and the whole faired beautifully.

There was a much too quick demonstration of the use of a planking fan.....I'd never encountered that before.

Anyway, I'd still like to see and pin the video. It made quite an impression on me, and everything clicked in my mind. Pretty damn sure I didn't imagine or dream it up.

My best wishes.

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AAAARGH!!!!

I'm drifting into senility. Finally re-discovered the planking video I've been rabbiting on about AND it isn't on this forum at all. I've just trawled my 'favourites' menu. THERE IT WAS all along. It's on YouTube, by a chap called Kenneth Branscome.

Perhaps others may find encouragement here. I found it most enlightening.

Hope this doesn't infringe some rule or other, after-all it's in the public domain. If there's a problem I don't see why its existence shouldn't be shared.

To me, that's several problems explained.

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Posted (edited)

If I can add to it a bit, I suggest you invest a little in the following:

- an excellent brochure by Jim Roberts "Planking the built-up ship model", where you'll find answers to the above (video) issues, as well as others, like how to model stealers, and so on...

- a pair of proportional dividers, which make spilling a bit easier than using a paper strip

- a good quality (metal) ship's curve (or cheaper plastic set of them) rather than a straight ruler

- a home made plank shaving jig (easy), with a miniature shaving block - to shape a spilled plank

 

Here is a link   http://www.boat-building.org/learn-skills/index.php/en/home-en/  to various techniques used in  full scale of boat/ship building.

Edited by Dziadeczek

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Dziadeczek, thanks for your tips, I've been trying to hunt down the Roberts publication on e-bay without success for o while.

The DIY jig you mention....would that be a miniature plane?

Thanks again.

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With all due respect, I have a beautiful pair of proportional dividers - which I never use for lining out a hull. Flexible paper strips and a radiating pattern do the job quickly and perfectly. However, I agree that ships' curves are very helpful when marking out spiled planks.

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, shipman said:

Dziadeczek, thanks for your tips, I've been trying to hunt down the Roberts publication on e-bay without success for o while.

The DIY jig you mention....would that be a miniature plane?

Thanks again.

A- rectangular plywood or solid wood base, clamped on both ends to a work table

B- smaller rectangular piece glued to the A

C- triangular piece cut across from another rectangle initially formed from C & D, this one glued to the A

D- similar piece like C, but this one not glued to A, loosely fit between B and C to slide and clamp there a strip of planking F, to be shaped there

E- miniature shaving plane for shaping (spilling) planks. You can also use a file or a sandpaper for this purpose.

 

I got this concept years ago from the Seaways forum, and it still serves me well.

 

plank tapering jig.jpg

Edited by Dziadeczek

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Ron, thanks for the heads-up.

Yes it's for sale on Amazon USA. But not where I am Amazon UK! I just checked that out.

As far as I can find; AbebooksUK are selling a copy in Canada. Pre-owned. £35.20 + £13.23 shipping! That's £48.43 GB Pounds. If that doesn't convert to $ without making your eyes water, you have no eyes.

And that's typically what I've been finding for a long time.

Amazingly, to my delight, a kind soul GAVE me a copy recently!

Now I've read it; yes it's good, but for what it costs here, I'd expect it to come with a band-saw/circular-saw and one of Snow Whites Dwarves to set it all up and complete the job for me and sweep up the mess!

Please accept my tongue-in-cheek candour; but hope you see what I mean.

It's common to see marvellous products for sale, online, over the pond, most of which never get exported here.

I'm generalising wildly, but say you spot something for $50; to get it shipped here I'm paying $25 US shipping + taxes. If you want a book, shipping adds about 130%.

Apart from Harley Davidsons, and you didn't watch the news, you wouldn't know the USA existed over here. That is; (and this is a big tongue in cheek moment) until the bombs start dropping!

Honestly, I firmly believe, where would we be without you, USA.

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I agree that shipping and other import duties from the US can be a pain (otherwise I’d buy up a lot more of Syren's stock!). 

 

However books aren’t usually too bad. I’ve just ordered the Jim Roberts book from the US via amazon.com for $14.99 + $4.44 shipping to the UK - just over £14 total. Not as cheap as yours though!

 

Derek

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The same goes for buying items from the UK to here, if not quite as bad. I've been looking at some stationary steam engine casting sets, and the shipping adds a significant fraction to the cost. Yet a couple years ago I bought something from Israel, and the shipping was less than mailing the same item within the US.

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