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The "What have you done today?" thread.

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3 hours ago, Altduck said:

Reminds me of the Veterinarian and the Taxidermist that decided to share office space to reduce expenses.

Over the door were their names, titles, and their motto:

"No matter what, you get your dog back"

 

Grandpa's shop was adjacent to an old fort, Fort Brook, here in Tampa. A lot of his work came from the US Army cavalry horses kept there. So I imagine having a veterinarian at the shop was more a necessity than a novelty or space-saving idea. In my meager personal experience around work horses, having a veterinarian handy is vital. Many horseshoe men I've seen were veterinarians in the first place.

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On 5/25/2018 at 2:37 PM, CDW said:

Made minor progress on the '41 Willys, "Stone, Woods, and Cooke" A/Gas dragster today. 

If the creek don't rise, will finish it this weekend. With the possiblity of a tropical cyclone in the Gulf, the creek could rise. B)

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I remember seeing that car and team in person and also building the model.  Wonderful folks, very fan friendly. One of my buds took his model to the track and they autographed it.   I'm hoping he still has it.  When they revised the rules and that class fell from favor I think drag racing lost some of it's appeal (for me at least).  I just never could get my head around "Funny Cars"....

 

BTW, if you don't know about the "team", do some Googling.  Very interesting in the context of what was going on back then in the US with race (not race cars) relations, racing, etc.   

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Thanks Mark. Yes, I am aware of the team makeup and it was a surprise to see that back then. It didn't happen very often.

That's a cool story about them autographing your friend's model.

 

I began to fall in love with the pro stock class when that first came out, an evolution of the super stock class. But then the pro stocks became so much like funny cars, it was neither fun nor funny any more. Funny cars were fun when they were wheel standing machines, like the Little Red Wagon. What happened over a rather short time, is they drove out the little guy from drag racing. That's the way I saw it evolve.

 

One of my best friends growing up had an older brother who was shipped off to Viet Nam while we were still in high school. His big brother was an avid drag racer/builder and had a newly built A/Gas '55 Chevy in their garage, He tasked us to start it up once a week while he was gone. We couldn't resist and took it out on the street in front of their house a couple of times for a "test" burnout. The neighbors were not impressed. Neither was his big brother when he got back home. He knew we took that car on the street. If nothing else, he probably knew we couldn't resist and just assumed we did. We confessed anyway.

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15 hours ago, CDW said:

I suppose they have to go at it from the stomach as their hides are like armor plate.

Okay you brought it up. This same biologist went on a hunting trip (deer) he only shot an armadillo.  So we tried to figure out how to cook it. He had a recipe for fried fish balls, we opened it up with tin snips scraped out what we could. I said Hugh this smells a little more than just gamey he swore it was not road kill he picked up. So he grabbed all his spices bread crumbs garlic Tony Cacheres Cajun seasoning cayenne pepper salt black pepper and peanut oil. He did his magic mixed all up and deep fried. Now I have eaten his fish balls and his homemade hush puppies excellent, but these still did not smell right after cooking. Man the Alligator Gar sausage would gag a maggot these things would gag the same maggot at twenty yards. I was too chicken to eat one he did. I was waiting for him to keel over he just said we don't need to eat these ( bet he picked up a fresh road kill a biologist will eat anything. )  He turned it upside down glued some plastic legs on it and made a cookie basket out of the shell last time I saw it he still had it. (same biologist had me bring a goat back in  my patrol boat that was posted here a couple of years ago.

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30 minutes ago, mtaylor said:

If you'll note, Lou, there's not a roll bar or cage either.  I think they had a lap belt but harnesses weren't around back then.   

The three-point seat belt we have today was invented by Nils Bohlin who was working for Volvo. Volvo introduced the first production three-point belt in 1959. The first car with a three-point belt was a Volvo PV 544 that was delivered to a dealer in Kristianstad on August 13, 1959. However, the first car model to feature the three-point seat belt as a standard item was the 1959 Volvo 122, first outfitted with a two-point belt at initial delivery in 1958, replaced with the three-point seat belt the following year.

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Hi Mark

I was going to mention the roll bar as well but I was being yelled at to get out the door!:(

 

Per

Was that the shoulder harness like we use today in the family auto? Lap belt plus one shoulder belt? I remember back as a kid that all of the SCCA track cars and Sports Prototypes had aircraft harness H style seat shoulder harnesses and at least a roll bar. 

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The 3-point is used in non-race cars and some drag race classes (speed, horsepower, etc are determining factors).   The 4-point lap/over the shoulder is the racing version for many classes.  It could be the kit just didn't have them.

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13 minutes ago, mtaylor said:

It could be the kit just didn't have them.

Yes I considered that a possibility as well. Models of that era seemed to be missing a lot of things we consider required details today. They were called "Curb side" models and needed to be embellished considerably if you wanted a really nice model.

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I intentionally left seat belts off this model. However, Mark is right, the original and reissued kits never came with seat belts. What I wanted to do with this model was build it as closely as I could to resemble the model I built 50 years ago. In it's day, this (and other Revell kits) was about as detailed a car model as you would ever find unless you could afford a Pocher kit from Italy which hardly any kid ever could.

 

As for "curbside models", those are models that have no engine and very basic chassis and interior details. They are made to capture the shape details of the body, only. Most often, they were called "promotional models" because you could buy them pre assembled from the major car dealers, GMC, Ford, and Chrysler. Those had chassis that screwed down to the body. Remember those?

 

PS: if you look closely at the photos, you will see a protrusion in back of the driver's seat that rises above the top of the seat back...this is the roll bar. There is an actual roll bar and it is covered with a padded interior piece that matches the rest of the interior.

 

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Edited by CDW

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I missed that entirely, but it's pretty clear once it's pointed out.

 

Almost all of the Sports Prototype/Can Am cars I built or are waiting to build have no frames and only the tops of engines. On some of them you can't even turn the front wheels like on both my Chaparrals, 2C and 2Ds They were both shelf kits that Cox and Monogram modified from slot cars. Other cars like the Ford GT40 MKII and Ferrari 330 P4 are much more intricate models. It seemed like the quality and detail of the kits was all over the map. Either way though they were fun to build and bring back a lot of memories. 

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I took some photos of my 1:18 scale Maserati 250F, Juan Manuel Fangio die cast car today. The model is produced by the CMC company out of Germany. I bought this copy about 15 years ago when they first came out. At the time, they sold for around $200+, but I do not know what they get for them today. The level of detail found in these models is astounding. The metal body panels are thin "sheet metal" rather than thick, clunky, die cast metal. Every single panel is removable to reveal a complete chassis and highly detailed suspension, cooling system, linkages, plumbing, fuel tanks, etc. The engine cover has working fasteners that open by twisting them to the appropriate location. The steering wheel is Walnut. The seat upholstery is padded cloth. Evry wire wheel is attached by a threaded knock off and when removed, reveals the detailed scale brake system.

It's levels of detailing like this that make the average modeler like me only build for fun. I could not achieve this level of detail in a model even if I wanted to, but if I did, it would probably take me years to do it. Who they find to construct models like these and then sell them for "peanuts" is a complete mystery to me. Along with this model, I have a number of other historically significant race cars that are equally detailed. 

 

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9 minutes ago, cog said:

Mr Bunny,

 

I could look at that beauty all day long ...

It takes days of staring at it to see, and then realize the level of detail that's there. 

Even if one could buy a kit of this exact model, it would likely cost more than the finished model as I bought it.

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These are the last two i am able to keep out after we got the terrorist kitten a few months ago. My other Ferrari 330 P2/3, Dino Ferrari, Porsche 908, McLaren, and three Chaparrals and a few others had to be put away after getting knocked off the shelf a few times. One of the Chaparrals and the Porsche suffered the worst. I finally found one wheel and tire for the Chaparral in the next room!

I can't remember the kit manufactures of either car it has been so long, but the Ferrari is a European kit and the Ford American. I have a couple of other kits still in boxes for Ford GT40s by the same maker. All of my collection is 1/24th and none of them can even come close to matching your Maserati in detail. I think I my IMC Mclaren that is still in the box might come close if done well, but it would still not have the threaded knock offs or padded seats!KIF_4082.thumb.JPG.eff2eec94f821e0eb2db710c7b4f7653.JPGKIF_4083.thumb.JPG.546280006a4dc5ce80333af9dc31970b.JPGKIF_4084.thumb.JPG.d0ab320f1a01950f477a5d3c0f1d0742.JPGKIF_4085.thumb.JPG.872e71c14ec57f6652fe9bba3c5fd55d.JPGKIF_4086.thumb.JPG.0f68ab09dd9fa13a5302e204fbc2dcd2.JPGKIF_4087.thumb.JPG.52de4da385290fd2956e8f4943ec03a7.JPG

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Love the GT40.  The original and the recent road version - actually sat in one of the new ones at the local dealer - he asked me if I wanted a test drive - I sure did but had to be honest and tell him I wasn't actually in the market - way out of my price bracket.

 

Years ago a guy pulled up at the Fire Station in a Pantera when I was on duty and asked if I would give his kid a tour.  I jokingly said "OK if you let me take your Pantera for a spin".  He said sure thing.  I gave the kid the tour and then he said "keep it in the neighborhood - we will wait here for you".  Had to get the Capt. to take us out of service so I could take it around a few blocks.  I had to do a few favors for the Capt. but he was a car guy and completely understood.  Jay Leno featured a Pantera just last week which jogged me memory of the car.

 

Kurt

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Lou

 

Love your Ferrari and GT40. Those cars were racing when we were most impressionable - as teens and pre teens. 

My Dad was a big race car fan and we went to many many circle track races. Daytona, the Fairgrounds, and even Sebring a time or two. Dad didn't care as much for Sebring as Daytona and similar tracks. Those cars bring back so many good memories.

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Glad to bring a few smiles to everyone. I LOVE these kinds of cars and even got to see a few of them race at Laguna Seca in my teen years and of course the Cam Am cars in the late 60s. It's nice to see that others like them as well. It's probably going to be another year or more before will be able to do much more than open the box that most of them are in and pet them now and then. When the cat gets old enough I can possibly put them out again. The Porsche will need some pretty major repairs though. I guess I didn't do as good a job of building it.

 

All my cars are 1960-70 Sports Prototype and Can Am cars in 1/24th. I also have the #10 Ferrari TRI that Phil Hill and Olivier Gendebien won the 1961 Le Mans in. It is in resin as well. Both cars were fairly hard to find. In fact looking back almost all my Ferrari's were kind of hard to find other than the 330 P4 hard top. 

 

Kurt

If it was me I would have taken the drive. If the guy was dumb enough to offer me the drive who am I to correct him? The closest I ever got to the same thing was a dealer offered to let me take a Glas for a test drive when I was just dreaming in a car lot one day looking at all the fast cars that I could never afford. I wasn't even 19 yet. I had a BALL, I'm not so certain he did! That car may not have been as fast as a GT 40 MKII but it could still handle, And I did some putting it through it's paces!

 

It's funny that you brought up the Pantera as well. They had a classic car show here this weekend and one of the cars i saw was a perfectly restored Pantera along with LOTS of hot rods

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I got to ride in a close cousin to the Ferrari, an Alfa Romeo. It was given to a friend as a college graduation present when he graduated from Notre Dame University in the 70's. The most impressive thing I remember about the car was the sound of the engine and how smooth it ran at high RPM's. Very fast and nimble. I can only imagine what a ride in a GTO 250 must feel like.

Speaking of which...I have a very nice kit of a Ferrari 250 California Spyder with a resin aftermarket v-12 engine I'll get around to building sooner or later. 

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2 hours ago, CDW said:

I have a very nice kit of a Ferrari 250 California Spyder

That's going to make a very pretty car. I always wondered if Shelby used that car as a design basis for his AC Cobra?

 

I had a couple of rich friends like that. One of them was given a Jaguar XK and we went all over the place in that car. It was quite the ride. Only problem was that it had a non syncro  transmission and I could never get the hang of driving it no matter how many times he tried showing me. He made it look so easy going up and down the gears as smoothly as a modern day automatic. I would do OK going up the gears but coming back down was a terror to behold. I'm sure I must have taken years off of the gear faces! I gave up for fear of wrecking the transmission and was just satisfied to sit back and enjoy the ride. THAT car would almost pin you back in the seat when you took off from a dead start and the first three gears!

Edited by lmagna

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My baby daughter turned 21 today, so we took her to Outback to celebrate the occasion.

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Our two oldest grand daughters were there

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and our next-to-youngest daughter was there.

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Then my wife had to get a picture of my ugly mug.

 

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6 minutes ago, CDW said:

my ugly mug

At least you helped make good looking kids and they made good looking grand kids. So we can overlook your shortcomings, :D I suspect they take after your wife anyway!

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