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The "What have you done today?" thread.

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On 12/19/2018 at 7:47 PM, BETAQDAVE said:

      SO HALLELUJAH!!  Apparently the elevator odyssey has come AT LAST to an end after a mere 70 days!     

I think this is the guys Dave hired:

 

Top 25 Engineer’s Terms and Expressions
(What we say versus what it means)
1. A number of different approaches are being tried. 
We are still guessing at this point.
2. Close project coordination. 
We sat down and had coffee together.
3. An extensive report is being prepared on a fresh approach. 
We just hired three punk kids out of school.
4. Major technological breakthrough! 
It works OK; but looks very hi-tech!
5. Customer satisfaction is believed assured. 
We are so far behind schedule, that the customer will take anything.
6. Preliminary operational tests were inconclusive.
The darn thing blew up when we threw the switch.
7. Test results were extremely gratifying! 
Unbelievable, it actually worked!
8. The entire concept will have to be abandoned. 
The only guy who understood the thing quit.
9. It is in process. 
It is so wrapped in red tape that the situation is completely hopeless.
10. We will look into it. 
Forget it! We have enough problems already.
11. Please note and initial. 
Let’s spread the responsibility for this.
12. Give us the benefit of your thinking. 
We’ll listen to what you have to say as long as it doesn’t interfere with what we have already done or with what we are going to do.
13. Give us your interpretation. 
We can’t wait to hear your bull.
14. See me or let’s discuss. 
Come to my office, I’ve screwed up again.
15. All new. 
Parts are not interchangeable with previous design.
16. Rugged. 
Don’t plan to lift it without major equipment.
17. Robust! 
Rugged, but more so
18. Light weight. 
Slightly lighter than rugged
19. Years of development. 
One finally worked
20. Energy saving. 
Achieved when the power switch is off.
21. No maintenance. 
Impossible to fix
22. Low maintenance. 
Nearly impossible to fix
23. Fax me the data. 
I’m too lazy to write it down.
24. We are following the standard! 
That’s the way we have always done it!
25. I didn’t get your e-mail. 
I haven’t checked my e-mail for days.

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I worked for a small company once, that made graphics systems for garment manufacturers. It helped them layout the patterns for max usage of the cloth. We setup one unit for display, when a customer was interested in a system. When the salesman stuck his head in just before he was ready to show the customer, the unit was pouring out black smoke! He quickly led the customer on an imprompto tour, while we exchanged it for another one!

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Every year one of our vacations is between December 24th and the 31st, my wife an I go somewhere. Last year was Peru and this year is Texas. We are staying in Corpus Christi on the beach and to my right is the aircraft carrier, the USS Yorktown, or as the Japanese called her the 'blue ghost'.

 

Rented a car and driving all over the place. San Antonio is on the list of retirement cities. Retirement will eventually be somewhere in the Southwest. Has to be warmer than Chicago. 

If there is no ship club, I'll just create one. 

Marcus 

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The last couple mornings I’ve been insulating the back wall of what will be the ship building section of the shop. This is the hardest part, as it is a 16x7 foot section of shelving. So I have to take down the “stuff” do the wall, then put the shelving and “stuff” back up. Limited room makes this interesting. The first pictures are right after I removed the left hand side of the shelving. I’ve gotten the left hand side double studded and double insulated (R-13 x 2 for R-26), so far (last picture). The side wall shown in the left of the first picture is already double studded, and has the through wall AC installed. The AC unit is a 5000 BTU window unit, semi-permanently mounted with bolts to the wall. A few years ago someone broke into my shop by pulling out the window AC unit, so now the shop has no windows and both units are bolted to the wall! For access to the filter I cut the mounts for the front of the AC so I can put it off and clean the filter. The one on this unit, normally slides out to the side. Great when in a window, but not so good in this use.

Wall_01.thumb.JPG.edf1ef0c130000cf26381f410ede57c1.JPG

Wall_02.thumb.JPG.6c699f17b5e6fa41160b1f040a4e3ecf.JPG

Wall_03.thumb.JPG.93eabb053313ddd9986d1fd6fbea4742.JPG

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Did you make sure getting the air gap in between the two layers of insulation? It's needed to avoid moisture build up. It's recommended to have 1" gap. Your wall thickness should be 10".

Edited by Nirvana

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1 hour ago, Nirvana said:

Did you make sure getting the air gap in between the two layers of insulation?

Ron

    Be careful with this gap and be sure that you provide fire-stops.  This was a feature of what was called the Envelope Home.  That was back in the days where everyone was so GUNG-HO about insulating to the extreme to save energy.  This gap was basically to completely separate the outer structure from the inner structure walls, even the roof!  However, due to leaving this gap there was no longer any fire-stop, and there were several tragic fires that exposed this short coming.  How this ever got by the building codes and the inspectors was somewhat of a mystery, as fire-stopping has been required for over 100 years! 

    We had one home in our neighborhood built this way that had a small fire in the basement that spread like wildfire after just a few minutes.  The fire department was there within 4 or 5 minutes, but all they could do was hose down the surrounding area to contain it to the one home.  This was because, once the fire got into this gap it raced throughout the structure with nothing to stop the spread of the fire and no way for the firefighters to even get at it. The entire home was totally engulfed within minutes and it was a total loss. 

    The fire inspectors later revealed that this gap created a chimney effect that made fighting the fire a futile effort.

     

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On 12/20/2018 at 10:37 PM, geoffs said:

...

 

One bright point, I took the opportunity while in town, to pick up a new Dremel 4300.

Look like the Dremel 4300 does not fit the Vandalay ACRA mill !  I'll ask Larry if he makes an adapter for it. If not, I might just have to get the Marathon rotary tool instead  as well.

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The last two weeks I got the back wall of the ship building area insulated, the electric lines in, and the bottom half sheet rocked. Today I installed the GFI for one of the 15 AMP lines and three outlets. This gives me power on both side walls, to eliminate the extension cord, that has been running through the door to the finished section. Next is dry walling the upper half of that wall, and the upper half of the shorted side wall, then spackling and painting. After all that is done, I can reinstall the shelving, and get to the rest of the walls.

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Today I stopped taking any more steps backward with the live edge coffee table.  For weeks I've been trying to find a finish that will allow the expoy to be crystal clear without creating a high gloss "bar top" look to the wood.  I officially gave up and laid the first of the final coats of epoxy over the top this morning.

 

Yesterday I ordered some gumbo limbo tree seeds.  When they arrive I'm going to see if I can get them growing.  Maybe one day one of them will become a tree out front.  I read the tree can grow from a seed to 6-8 feet in 18 months.  Maybe by the time I am too old to climb it, it will look like this:

2023923661_gumbo_limbo1.jpg.7e5194b915c44d2be13791dd247cdd9c.jpg

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1 hour ago, Julie Mo said:

Yesterday I ordered some gumbo limbo tree seeds.  When they arrive I'm going to see if I can get them growing.  Maybe one day one of them will become a tree out front.  I read the tree can grow from a seed to 6-8 feet in 18 months.  Maybe by the time I am too old to climb it, it will look like this:

 

That looks similar to the Kapok Tree.

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3 hours ago, CDW said:

I can see the tops of my work counters again. 

Now it's to work on another model so I can completely clutter it all up again. 🙂

 

WOW! You did such a great job I'm going to actually let you come over to my workshop and show me how you do that trick!

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22 minutes ago, Julie Mo said:

WOW! You did such a great job I'm going to actually let you come over to my workshop and show me how you do that trick!

My tricks to clean things are nothing to compare with my ability to clutter things up. I'm like an evil Jedi in that regard. A master of disaster. 😃

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