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The "What have you done today?" thread.

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3 hours ago, lmagna said:

Veggie burgers with Avocados! :(:o  

Lou,

 

You folks on the west coast are into organic this and organic that and vegan and vegetarians and I do not begrudge that and believe to each his own! You have the crazies and we have the rednecks even they have some value to society (haven't figured out exactly what yet). Home grown is the best asst veggies, raise your own chicks fresh eggs are wonderful. Grain fed Angus if you have the room. I grow the best tomatoes in the southeast if you saw how I fertilized them you would probably not eat one to say the least there very organic in the opposite way.

 

Nothing is better than a plate of green fried tomatoes and a pile of hot spicy crawfish (mudbugs), the sour of the tomato sets off the heat of the crawfish especially when you suck the fluid and spice from the heads first. Guess I'll finish my food postings.:cheers:

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1 hour ago, CDW said:

Beef Liver for example

At last someone brings up something I have eaten!

 

Beef liver is one of those dishes that like Harry Potter's Bertie Bott's Every Flavour jelly Beans depends on what you get! Liver can range from good and flavorable, (With onions) to dried shoe leather. As it has no fat it can go from one flavor to the other in seconds. To be honest it is a love/hate food for me. I like it when it is made right, (seldom) and detest it when it's not, (most times). Unfortunately like Bertie Bott's there is too much chance of getting Vomit, ear wax, or booger flavor so I almost never order it.

 

Lou

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26 minutes ago, John Allen said:

You folks on the west coast are into organic this and organic that and vegan and vegetarians

NOT ME! I am pretty much a meat and potato fan with junk food thrown in for good measure! I probably won't live that long but at least i will have lived! Man was not designed to live like a rabbit. Every veggie person I know insists that they are allergic to this or that or can't eat something or another. In addition, the ones in my age range look like they have been put out in the sun to dry like a raisin. I must admit that long time smokers look worse though.

My only food limit is taste, at least so far!

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On 8-4-2018 at 11:18 AM, Omega1234 said:

What did I do today?

 

Well, folks, this morning my lovely wife treated me to a yummy Sunday brekkie and I LOVED IT!!!!

 

What a great way to start the day!😃😃😃

 

Enjoy!!!!

 

Cheers. 

 

Patrick

 

 

 

 

Mjammie (yummy)

 

eggs, beans, bacon and mushrooms as breakfast

I'm jealous 

 

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Posted (edited)

I just can't get my mind wrapped around that black pudding thing. Haggis I read up on and learned the USA does not allow it's import as I understand it. However, there was a toned down product that was allowed import, but there was something about the English recipe that is not allowed here. Just can't remember what exactly.

 

Edited by CDW

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2 hours ago, John Allen said:

Lou,

 

 

 

Nothing is better than a plate of green fried tomatoes and a pile of hot spicy crawfish (mudbugs), the sour of the tomato sets off the heat of the crawfish especially when you suck the fluid and spice from the heads first. Guess I'll finish my food postings.:cheers:

Add some fried Okra and cold brews and this New Orleans boy would be in hog heaven!

 

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Posted (edited)

My first mother-in-law - the French one - used to make jam (ie, jelly in US) using green tomatoes.

Sounds horrid.  But delicious, actually.

 

Reason was, they had a 6-acre garden and lots of tomato plants, and I'm talking about the couple of decades that immediately followed WW2.  Wasting green tomatoes at the end of the season was just unthinkable.

Edited by probablynot
Historical anecdote

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2 hours ago, probablynot said:

Wasting green tomatoes at the end of the season was just unthinkable.

Brian 

I think the wasting thing may be generational. I could possibly be considered a hoarder in some circles stemming from the fact that I didn't really have all that much when growing up and tried to make everything last forever by reusing and repairing. As an example I only had one bike during my entire childhood from the time I could almost not reach the peddles, all the way into high school, and it was used when I got it! Today it seems kids around here won't even ride a bike to high school! 

My kids and grandkids seem to think that if you don't have an immediate use for it, or if you have too much you just get rid of it. This goes along with having to have the latest of everything.

Drives me crazy sometimes.

 

Lou

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For your taste buds try this Swedish dish that I don't want to try.

The stories I heard about it while growing up in Sweden turned me away 100%, haggis is nothing in comparison.

It's called surstromming (fermented herring), look it up on youtube

Happy Dining! lol

 

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My mother's family have been farmers and cowboys here in Florida for generations. Growing up, we had the best fresh vegetables you can imagine and lots of them. These farmer families didn't have a lot of money, but man we had plenty to eat. During the harvest seasons, we all spent lots of time canning fresh vegetables. Big corporations have driven out most all the family-owned farms that used to be around. But they still grow large gardens and some still farm commercially.

 

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For us canning was a yearly event and involved everyone in the family for hours each day until that particular item was sitting on the shelf in the basement. Then we would start all over for the next item until the season was over. We did the same with cheese for a few years. Got so used to the routine that every kid knew what their jobs were without supervision.

 

We also had chickens and ducks for eggs and food. Tried to do the same with a cow once but having raised it pretty much by hand by the time Dindin became old enough to be food he was almost as much of a pet as the dog to us kids. My dad sold him and we bought the meat instead.

 

Not too many years later we moved into town and that life pretty much came to an end.

 

Lou 

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Can't help it one more. Was a biologist aide for a couple of years (step and fetch it) when sampling trawling seining etc it was usually 8 to 10 hrs in a boat and we always brought lunch.

 

There was 1 exception for me when a certain biologist went along. He would bring a very large can of Sweet Sue tripe, pour in hot sauce and dribble it in his mouth with his fingers it running down his shirt. Soon as he opened the can a cloud arose and a stink from hell really bad in summer 98 degree heat no gag reflex an immediate chuck it all up. When I had a heads up he would be going I could usually come up with an excuse to avoid the trip, or not take a lunch because I would lose it.:(:angry::huh:

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As a kid, I'd be sent to the local chicken market for a freshly killed hen. Mr. Damiano would take one out of his crates and do his business on it. I brought home darn near everything except the head and some of the innards. Mom would make  chicken for dinner and everything else went into the soup pot, even the feet (after first scrubbing them clean). Home made chicken noodle soup, yummy.  I did draw the line at eating the feet, but Mom, being a Depression era lady, thought it was fine.

 

That Vietnamese fish sauce(?) was unique. The Thais had some similar stuff, although I avoided it like the plague. The Norwegians have something called lutefisk (?) and it was another dish I declined to sample. Did try haggis once, on a dare, to say I did. A few pints washed that "taste" away. I'm a born and bred Yankee, but I see no problems with well prepared grits. Been eating it since college (50 years ago). Best with breakfast (eggs, bacon, toast) on top of your eggs. Better grits than scrapple (meats and grain scraps from a meat packing plant ^_^).

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10 hours ago, lmagna said:

... by the time Dindin became old enough to be food he was almost as much of a pet as the dog to us kids. My dad sold him and we bought the meat instead.

 

You didn't ever wonder about having a pet cow named Dindin, Lou ??

:cheers:

(PS In Tasmania, my parents had a lamb they'd named Dinner.)

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My "country" family says there is something about those chicken feet that make the best-ever soup stock. It's a flavor they say you don't get with any other part of the chicken. They don't actually eat the feet, just render the flavor for stock. I only know this because I saw the feet for sale in the supermarket and asked "what the heck do you do with chicken feet?" I thought it was part of some type of voodoo ritual. :D

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2 hours ago, Backer said:

In Belgium OKRA is an association for those over 55.

Fried okra ? Do not order this in Belgium in a restaurant ;) LOL

 

https://www.okra.be/

 

I remember being in a pub in Portsmouth England in the early 70’s with a bunch of my shipmates as they were all drunkenly bragging  about their memberships and belt buckles from the IRA. The pub got real real quiet. I had to explain to the patrons that my idiot drunk cowboy friends were talking about the International Rodeo Association and show some belt buckles in order to calm things down. My friends were clueless about bragging about  IRA membership in England. Ship made an announcement over the 1MC the following day about no IRA talk in town.

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Posted (edited)

The more I read on this the more I become certain that I have truly lead a sheltered life!:huh:

 

I am having to look some of this stuff up just to find out what it is, and I watched at least a couple of seasons of Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern! You guys are putting him to shame.

 

Captain Steve

We were pretty young at the time and thought Dindin was more generic rather than descriptive. We did know that the meat on the table was cow, we just didn't think that some day it would be OUR cow.

 

CDW

What make you think it isn't part of a voodoo ritual? Our store has so many chicken feet in the meat section, they can't ALL be for making soup and after all you and John kind of live in Voodoo country!:o By the way what do you do with pickled chickens feet?

 

Lou

 

Edited by lmagna

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Oh trust me, there ARE voodoo and similar rituals around here. I ran across some of the sites of it while at work, and unknowingly started moving some of the objects around looking at them. Friends who knew what it was, yelled at me to leave the stuff alone. I guess they believe in the power of the stuff...I don't.

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1 hour ago, lmagna said:

Voodoo country

Lou, It is voo doo country I order new dolls and pins every quarter.

 

There are folks here that deep fry chicken legs kind of like cracklin pork skin, or fried pig intestine chitterlings.

A lot of these recipes were handed down from slavery or when the Acadians were sent to the swamps in Louisiana and wasted nothing and ate anything to survive.

 

Okra was brought from Africa. A mainstay for a good gumbo it is used as a thickener, gumbo is another dish where un-identifiable items float around. Mine is the best I ever had bar none, chicken, sausage, oysters, shrimp a little ham. scallions red onions celery file bell pepper and a little cayenne pepper its one of those all day cooking's I make a perfect roux (the starter) no chicken feet. and its cooked better when the cook is :cheers:

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I was at the Basel fleamarket today and picked up a dozen 50 mm diameter saw blades still in their packing. 110 teeth and 10 mm bore which fits my proxxon saws. Down side is they're only 0,4 mm thick,however should be ok for cutting thinner timber and brass or copper sheet. Only cost one Franc each (about US $1) so I'm a happy bunny with that buy :)

 

Dave :dancetl6:

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