CaptainSteve

The Kit-Basher's Guide To The Galaxy

372 posts in this topic

Jewelry

 

Jewelry was already mentioned but here's a fun spin on it.  I made this for one of my early ship in bottle builds.  The ships to ugly to show and this was just rattling around in the bottle so I pulled it out and got a couple shots.  

 

A treasure chest.

 

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This was some of my earlier work and it's a bit sloppy.  A better modeler could make the gold chain look more like coins.  

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I'm sure, at the small scale you work in, Daniel, that they looked just fine.

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Ensign, on 03 Jan 2014 - 10:40 PM, said:

After much searching I have found a source of the correct diamond pattern Hammock Netting for period model ships, I was looking in a store called Spotlight for those in Australia and NZ, not sure if they are in other countries but I'm sure there are similar haberdashery, craft type stores. The material is Mosquito Netting and found in the curtain department, it comes in a range of colors but most importantly cream and black it cost $4.99/Metre, enough for a flotilla. Hope this benefits others.

Can you post a picture of your product? Is it something like in post #19 above? I bought about a 1mt. of this material and have enough for a lifetime.

 

 

 

Sorry for the late reply Ulises, only just noticed your question. Yes that is the stuff.

 

Gary

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I'm sure, at the small scale you work in, Daniel, that they looked just fine.

It does look better when your not looking at it through a zoomed in camera lens.  Actually it's bigger then you'd expect.  The scene I created was a ship sailing into shore with treasure on the beach.  The treasure was much bigger then the scale of the ship.  It's probably more to scale with the larger scale models.  Would have made a major haul for the tiny ship I had in the bottle.  I'll have to redo the scene one of these days.  A better ship and a launch rowing into shore would make it much better.    

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As well as Daniel's aforementioned masts for small ships, BAMBOO BBQ SKEWERS are also the perfect material for making Treenails. A pack of 100 skewers costs about $2.00 and will make about 80,000 treenails (rough estimate :D ).

 

Using a sharp Xacto knife, split the skewer lengthways into as many strips as possible - depending on the quality of the bamboo used (which varies between brands and even individual skewers) you can get up to 8 or 9 thin strips. Pull these through a Drawplate until the desired size is reached - 0.024" is perfect at 1:48 scale. Use pliers to pull any stubborn strips through the drawplate - bamboo splinters are almost impossible to get out of your finger :huh:  . Trim the end as needed.

 

One finished piece should yield about 100 "nails".

 

:cheers:  Danny

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I've found that brass eyelets (like on shoes) make great porlight/deadlight frames.

 

I also use double backed tape on a square of plywood to make a good sanding block. I've used 1/4-1/2" think wood before for sanding blocks, but find they do warp.

 

When putting beeswax on line, I stretch and drag the waxed line over one of my lights (the shield, not the bulb itself). The heat from the incandesent bulb gets the cover to about 150 deg F, and melts the wax into the line.

 

To straighten a piece of brass wire, clamp one end in a vise and the other in vice grip pliers. Pull hard for a little bit and the wire will work harden into a straight rod.

 

Harvey

 

For a quick sharpen of a chisel or plane, I tape a sheet of 400 or 600 grit sandpaper on a sheet of glass instead of using a sharpening stone. It also works on exacto blades.

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Hammock netting

 

This is a great source for netting.

http://www.meshuk.co.uk/index.php?option=com_ixxocart&Itemid=121&p=product&id=4&parent=8

In the UK but might export?

They offer a large range of materials and sizes.

For instance 'Pet polyester mesh Black

Counts per inch 15 ((1"/15) x scale 72) = 4.8 inch pitch

They also do woven stainles steel wire.

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ROUND TOOTHPICKS (AGAIN): To simulate treenails.

1- Cut a bunch (big bunch) of round toothpicks in half.

2- Drill the hole  in your deck or hull of the desired size.

3- Dip one point of one of your half toothpicks in full strength wood glue.

4.- Stick it in the hole and let dry.

5- Cut using a toe nail clipper or similar utensil. A nail clipper is better because it has a straight edge and both edges come to close at 

the same level. Unlike scissors which overlap the cutting edges and put more tension on the object being cut. This 'may' tear the toothpick out of place.

6- Sand until flush.

7- Apply your favorite finish.

Sometimes is better if the treenails do not stand out too much, so I prefer not to stain the toothpicks. When you apply your finish, the treenails and the surrounded wood, being different, will assimilate the finish differently and provide a nice smooth contrast.

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FISH HOOKS - To make whale-boat harpoons.

 

I cut the tips from some small fish-hooks and attached the barb piece to a round tooth-pick to make harpoons. There are thousands of different sizes of hooks, so select ones to your own scale.

 

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As well as looking good, they will also help to reinforce any "Do Not Touch the Model" signs you may have.

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ROUND TOOTH PICKS (Yet one more use)

 

As  "plugs" to temporarily fix the line in their belaying pin holes, while making adjustments and making sure everything is as it should be.

I use these instead of the actual belaying pins as these are easier to handle, and if one is lost, it really doesn't matter.

Once I'm sure everything is OK I glue the definitive pin in the hole, and add the coil. Photos of this last step later.

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I have used the small eyelet from hundreds of fish hooks as jackstay eyebolts on my Cutty Sark (1:78) and on every block. The trick is to find the right size according to scale. I used Dry Fly Fishing Hooks, No. 14 and 16 for the CS. Since the eyelet on top of the hook is manufactured at an angle it needs to be bent straight again, most brands will brake during bending, they're made from steel. The only brand, I found that will not brake (or very few only) is MUSTAD from Norway. My fishing and hunting store always orders them for me.

For my current project (1:96 scale), I will even go smaller and will use No. 16, 18 and 20 Size. When using these eyelets in blocks, I have to make sure the remaining stem on the eyelet is short  enough so it does not interfere with the sheave hole. That is kind of tricky.

Regards,

Ulrich 

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@ Daniel Siemens.

Your ships in a bottle are so intense.  The details on such a small scale is amazing.  The shrouds and the sails......... amazing.

I love looking at your finished builds.

Excellent wo9rk.

Marc

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BROOM BRISTLES FOR TREENAILS

I got  a broom with plastic black bristles and thought about this for my ships.

I am assuming you drill holes first or because the bristles are of such a small diameter, you push a pin to make the holes.

I would love to know the process, as this is something I want to do in my next built.

Thanks,

Marc

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ROUND TOOTH PICKS (Yet one more use)

 

As  "plugs" to temporarily fix the line in their belaying pin holes, while making adjustments and making sure everything is as it should be.

I do this as well and it works great.

Marc

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I am assuming you drill holes first or because the bristles are of such a small diameter, you push a pin to make the holes.

I would love to know the process, as this is something I want to do in my next built.

Thanks,

Marc

Hey Marc. Yes holes are drilled. They usually go all the way through the planks and the false deck.

Find a suitable drill,  about the size of your bristles. Drill several holes and then dip one end of the bristle in CA and glue in the hole. (This is one of those very rare occasions in which I use CA.) Once glued, snip them at an angle (see second photo) so you have a sharp point to insert the next time. I usually use a toe nail clipper, the kind that has a straight edge, to snip them flush just before sanding.

To be honest, I now lean more towards using toothpicks instead of bristles. Wood to wood adheres better and the contrast is more subtle, but that's just me. ;)

Hope this helps.

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Thank you Marc.  :)

 

I thought of another material.  Paper.  

 

I use paper for the tiny details I can't other wise do but there's another use.  At out ship club some one demonstrated making boats out of paper.  I had done this before on a much smaller scale and I was surprised to see it on a large scale.  

 

Here's the long boat I did for my Mercury build.  even the benches are paper stained with wood stain.

 

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Here's the process I use.  First carve a wood plug in the shape of your boat.  

 

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I then plank on the paper.  For the larger scale this isn't needed.  use cigarette paper and paint on big strips with water.  You may need to make some cuts around the curves so the paper doesn't crinkle.  After it's on paint it with glue and add another layer.  They used five or six layers on the bigger models.  Once dried details and paint can be added.  

 

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I trimmed off the edges and got a very small ship.  

 

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This could be great for dories and whale boats.  Making each ship doesn't take as much time as carving or planking.  

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A stupid person's (me) guide for making pulleys, Capt. Steve was nice enough to ask me to share (:-)

 

 

My first attempt at using a Proxxon lathe to make pulleys in the early stages looked ok. Then came the part that I had to cut and trim the grooved dowel piece in order to slip the new pulleys into the new blocks I just built; Hmmm no good - they looked weak.

 

I then noticed that I had a loose cannon wheel lying about that was the same width as my dowel. Eureka, as a solution I then used my Proxxon rotary tool to spin the carriage wheels in order to cut grooves; again weak and inconsistent results.

 

Then another thought popped in. I could use small deadeyes that are so nicely pre-grooved and then just thin their sides a bit with a rotary tool, and just slip then in; Voilà.

 

The synapses were responding to absolute frustration with my inability to actually make these silly little monsters; cannibalization seemed to be an approach. 

 

Regards,

 

Michael

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WATCH PARTS - Search E-Bay for this phrase: "steam punk". A 30g packet containing hundreds of miniscule cogs, gear-wheels, coils and springs cost me less than A$20.00 (including shipping). Watch-spring coils will, I imagine, make excellent mast-bands!!

 

 

Watch parts can be used to make a jig for "makeing" or simulating rivets on cooper plates etc etc

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OFFICE PAPERCLIPS

 

Inexhaustible source of different thickness wire that can be easily processed. I made ( just making) inside bulwark staanchions from paperclips

 

TELEPHONE LINE WIRE

 

Inexhaustible source of thin cooper wire for different purposes

 

Cellophane from a cigarette box

 

 Can emulate glass on windows, lanterns etc etc

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Those small "gourmet" foods for dogs and cats... clean and keep the trays.  They are excellent for holding parts, sub-assemblies, and even using them for blackening solution.  I also use them for soaking parts that need to be disassembled in alcohol (but NOT acetone!!!).

 

I also have a small collection of plastic "pill cups", the kind used in hospitals (some pharmacies/chemists sell them). Used also for blackening and/or keeping bits and pieces in.

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I also have a small collection of plastic "pill cups", the kind used in hospitals (some pharmacies/chemists sell them). Used also for blackening and/or keeping bits and pieces in.

You have a small collection and I have way too many of them. Keep parts in them as well as computer parts. Because they close nicely with the little lock, nothing falls out.

 

I make fine rings out of the old fashion ball point pens I still see lying around. The springs are nice and round and easy to cut.

 

The admiral got on my case the other day when I took apart an old vacuum cleaner which she was throwing in the trash. I started separating all the parts I could use and trash. Then I found a little motor with copper wire on it and started unraveling that. She told me if I need that so bad go buy it, and it would be new and I did not have to clean it.

 

So I did that, but kept a few parts I can mold into something else.

 

Marc

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Since long time ago, everything electrical or mechanic which must go to trash, first cross through my hands, to cannibalize them, put off screws and nuts first. Many times in life this collection of different screws and nuts I keep, save my time and resolved problem. Wires of different kind also.

 

Ship modelling opened my eyes for another potential useful pieces/things/stuff/issues of all kind in surrounding

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I've often thought that the fluff gathered in the filter of my tumble dryer machine ought to be useful, somehow, for modelmaking.  Seems to come in such an interesting range of colours, and it's so fine!   Wool bales?  Something to do with the cannons?

Or do you think I ought to chuck out the box-full I've already got stored away ...

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I've often thought that the fluff gathered in the filter of my tumble dryer machine ought to be useful, somehow, for modelmaking.  Seems to come in such an interesting range of colours, and it's so fine!   Wool bales?  Something to do with the cannons?

That is an excellent idea and I am going to start doing that. On a very early model I built I used Q-tips for the sponge and the rammer for the cannon accruements. I did shape the Q-tip somewhat and painted it black.

 

Marc

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