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md1400cs

How do I make a "made mast"?

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Hi,

 

I would like to make a "made mast" for the main mast of my Vasa. I have searched MSW and Google for "how to" put one together that would look period correct, but can't find any advice. I do see many of you add the ropes, and metal bands around the main masts. I would like to add the made look as well. R.C. Anderson explains what they are, but skips over how to properly replicate one.

 

I do have a Proxxon lathe. (a Clayton Jennings pic is attached). His Vasa is the most accurate ever scratch built. He has received awards from the Vasa museum. 

 

Any leads or links would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

 

Michael

post-735-0-11603000-1387409188_thumb.jpg

thibaultron likes this

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Hi Michael, never heard that term "made mast" , what does that mean?... I'm sure with the talent you have , you'll have no problem doing what ever that entails. :)

Frank

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Frank,

 

A "made mast" as opposed to a "single stick" had to be made up of several (two or three) single trunks. This was done, according to R.C. Anderson, when the builders could not procure tree trunks that had enough girth to result in a large enough main mast. Here is an other pic from Clayton's Vasa.

 

Anderson suggests that this "detail" be skipped, but my wife tells me that I've become obsessive. So I need to prove her right, because as we know women are always right. As I tell people when they meet her, "This is my 19 year old girlfriend from 40 years ago". still my sweetheart.

 

Thanks for the vote of confidence. I will also search the scratch built side, looking for an easy way of replicating this without having to do too much thinking on my part, it being near the end of the year and all (:-)

 

Cheers,

 

Michael

post-735-0-34340300-1387412968_thumb.jpg

Ulises Victoria and riverboat like this

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I was going to suggest you ask this question directly to Clayton or Fred Hocker in the VASA Forum, but saw you already did. 

This is interesting enough for me to follow. I may apply this knowledge in my next build... for my Vasa, it's too late. :)

md1400cs likes this

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I was going to suggest you ask this question directly to Clayton or Fred Hocker in the VASA Forum, but saw you already did. 

This is interesting enough for me to follow. I may apply this knowledge in my next build... for my Vasa, it's too late. :)

Ulises,

 

I don't remember you mentioning a name for your next build. Have you chosen a subject?

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There is a article in Ship Modeler's Shop Notes II published by the NRG that details how to make a made mast and the article was written by a man named John M. Bobbitt . I'm sure you can procure the info you are looking for there.

 

Happy Modeling,

Marty G.

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Made masts in Sweden in the early 1600's were very different from Steel's British practice of 1800, Henry.

 

My suggestion is to study photos of the Vasa's masts to see where the joints appear. The inside construction, being invisible, will be unimportant, as long as the joints are in the correct places on the surface of the mast when you've competed shaping it.

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Henry, Marty, and Druxey thanks guys!

 

Your responses put things into perspective. I will check out the source material as well as making sure that I will be period appropriate. Noted, the inside construction will hide any errors the intent will be to make the main look correct.

 

Thanks

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An interesting project Michael.To join the segments together will require the use of a miller more that a lathe.Yes I know you have just acquired one ;) If you look at Jeronimo's build,while this may not be the same as Vasa,it gives you an idea of how the pieces fit together.He doesn't show the manufacture but if you look at the completed work you can see the joints on the end.All pictures I have seen involve some sort of 'keying' between the sections.

Kind Regards Nigel

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Ulises,

 

I don't remember you mentioning a name for your next build. Have you chosen a subject?

Michael: Yes. I'ts in the super small print in my signature. :) Most likely I will build the Royal Louis in 1/90 by Mamoli.

 

Best regards.

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Michael: Yes. I'ts in the super small print in my signature. :) Most likely I will build the Royal Louis in 1/90 by Mamoli.

 

Best regards.

Oh yes, now I see it. Hmmm that will be a very challenging and amazing project. Beautiful ship. I will look forward to your new log. I looks as though your Vasa is ready to launch. Be sure to close the lower gun deck doors, and remove some of the weather deck cannons; then is should be ok. (:-)

trippwj and Ulises Victoria like this

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Michael

There is a pretty good pdf article in the "Article Downloads" section here at MSW.  It s called Making a Mast (or Yard) from Square Stock by

Elia Gianopulo.

 

Look at the top of the page for the download site.

Tom

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Tom,

 

Thanks big time. Great source info. In fact I saved several other excellent files as well. I appreciate your post.

 

Michael

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Hi Michael. Frolick shows how to make a mast in his book, The Art of Ship Modeling, on page 185. Its a very good book and does give one some insight's in to other items like casting cannons, framing and a whole lot more. Good book for your library.

Gary

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twintrow wrote about a pdf article wich were in article downloads section about "making a mast......." were is that section in the MSW?

 

Tanks in advance.

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Here is the picture of the made mast of the Great Britain from Greenwich, nicely seen at least 8 parts.

 

800_Victory_Mast_417.jpg

 

and the Victory with different structure 

800_Victory_Mast_7781.jpg

 

Just one small question: Did the Vasa have made masts? I always believed it to be pole masts. Even the much bigger Victory had pole masts when build in 1765.

 

Cheers, Daniel

Edited by dafi

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I'm considering making a laminated (Glulam) mast for long term stability. Even a piece of square stock halved then glued reversing the grain direction should eliminate any warping in one axis, four pieces would be even better, and with a carbon fiber arrow shaft center about the ultimate. Look at the Maltese Falcons' masts for an example of how far mast making has come. This would permit more tension on the rigging without sagging making the model look really well trimmed out.

 

Ed

Canute and mtaylor like this

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