woodrat

Venetian Carrack or Nave Rotonda 1/64 by woodrat

434 posts in this topic

Ah, of course! Thank you for the explanation, Dick.

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On 10/03/2017 at 4:36 PM, Matle said:

For what it's worth, I remember an original drawing of an 18th century Swedish galley showing the same concave-convex arrangement on the joint of the two halves of each yard. So it seems like a persistent technology.

Yes. It survived well into last century as this photo of a dhow from 1972 attests.

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This the mainyard ready to be swayed up

 

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Yes, four rows of parrels. However, the problem is how to attach them in such a way as the parrels can be loosened and tightened as required for adjustment of the position of the yard on the mast. Many of the contemporary illustrations show the yard positioned at varying distances from the top. This may have been a way to adjust for varying wind strengths and directions (?)

Dick

 

This is one of the best illustrations of running rigging to the mainsail

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The mainyard is temporarily attached to the mainmast by ties and halliards. Note that the halliards pass through large blocks on either side of the top of the mainmast

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Nice going, Dick. Might I suggest a either a little wax or a light singeing? (Not for you, but to get rid of the fuzz on your line!)

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Thanks Druxey. I did wax the halliards but I might try your singeing. I used a different line which is inferior. I will redo it.

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Thanks Druxey and Jesse. Here are the halliard block being temporarily installed to get the halliard length right. The blocks are made of jarrah, a West Australian hardwood.

I have made the mainsail using paper and hopefully will install soon.

Dick

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A beautiful timber, jarrah. Am I right in thinking you've made sheaves for those blocks?

 

What kind of paper are you going to use for the sail?

 

Steven

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I regret to say, Steven, that I bought the sheaves, although I did blacken them myself. The paper I am trying is acid free calligraphy paper which is a bit like vellum. It is an experiment and may end in tears (pun!)

 

This shows the paper strips glued with acid-free clear glue. I will do a mainsail with 2 bonnets. One of my other hobbies is bookbinding so this feels OK to me.

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Dick

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