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j21896

HMS Mars by j21896 - Caldercraft (Modified Kit) - 1:64

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Thanks Augie and Jason!

 

On the waterways Jason, I chose to tackle them in two pieces rather than one: a "backing strip" that would be hidden (you can see it in the earlier photos beneath the spirketting), and the visible waterway strip itself, which is glued to that backing strip.

 

I first determined what I wanted the dimension of the "diagonal face" of the waterway to be (I think around 8 to 10 scale inches).  To obtain that, I took a 1/8" x 1/8" square strip and planed it down to a triangular profile.  I left a little flat lip at the bottom of the diagonal face, roughly equal to the thickness of the margin and deck planks, for them to butt up against.

 

The "backing strip" was made of strip stock 1/16" thick (equal to the thickness of the spirketting) by 1/8" high (equal to the height of the back face of the triangular waterway strip).  After that had soaked in hot water for a bit, I clamped it in place to form it to the curve at the bow, and glued it in place once dry.

 

After a couple hours of soaking in hot water I clamped the waterway strip up against the backing strip and false deck to form it to the curve at the bow.  Once dry, I removed it and did a little sanding of the back, right-angle portion of the triangle where necessary to get it to sit flush with the backing strip and false deck all the way around.  Then I cut the scarph joints using an exacto knife, and filed/sanded them to fit.

 

From there it was just glue and clamp.  The "backing strip" is completely hidden by the waterway and spirketting.  Once the margin plank was installed, I fine sanded the waterway as best I could to form a smooth transition to the deck.

 

I hope this helps.

 

Robert

Edited by j21896

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Capstan
 

The kit-provided capstan was made of plywood, and since I’m not using paint on any parts of the ship, it was time for a scratch-built replacement.  (I also wasn’t crazy about the shape of the kit capstan.  Plus, I really just want to scratch build the rest of this ship anyway!)


Unlike the companionway – which was improvised – there is a drawing of the capstan on the NMM plans which I could use.  I couldn’t however, resist taking a bit of “artistic license” with some aspects of the piece.      ;)                                                                                                                   

 

Kit-Provided Capstan vs. NMM Plans

 

post-130-0-26238800-1361572183_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-130-0-88335700-1361572191_thumb.jpg

 

 

The spindle was made from Swiss pear, and to fabricate it, I got some practice using the technique for making masts that should come in handy later:   I planed down some square stock to 8 sides, then 16 sides, and then sanded it round.              


The welps are made of cherry – shown here temporarily glued together side-to-side, for uniform shaping with a file.  (I would ultimately use only six of them, but I made a few extra just in case.  And yes, they came in handy!)

 

post-130-0-21898100-1361572274_thumb.jpg

 

Next, slots for the chocks were cut, and the welps were tapered and glued around the spindle.  The chocks were then fabricated in cherry and added – which took about five times more effort and time than the rest of the capstan components combined!

 

post-130-0-32036500-1361572336_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-130-0-72809000-1361572343_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-130-0-37842200-1361572349_thumb.jpg

 

 

To make the drumhead, I used a compass to draw circles on cherry sheet, and roughly cut out the discs using my new scroll saw for the first time (Very roughly!  I definitely need practice scrolling!)
 

I trimmed them a little closer with an Exacto knife, drilled a hole through the compass point in their centers, and screwed them into a Dremel mandrel.  Using a Dremel drill press and sand paper held against an angle iron, I sanded them round. (see the many “just in case” extra discs in the background!)

 

 

post-130-0-70628400-1361572456_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-130-0-04079300-1361572464_thumb.jpg

 

 

I cut out the slots for the capstan bars using a micro chisel blade – destroying several of those "extra" discs before getting it right -- and assembled the drumhead.

 

post-130-0-55664500-1361572537_thumb.jpg

 

 

post-130-0-30837400-1361572544_thumb.jpg

 

Edited by j21896

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A first rate addition to an already top rate model.

 

Nicely done!!!!!

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Capstan – continued
 

Okay, time for that “artistic license”!                           

 

Having read that decorations were often added to the “caps” of capstans, I thought I’d take a crack at it.  I figured a nautical star design might be appropriate.

 

post-130-0-62522700-1361574642_thumb.jpg

 

For the required contrast, I used some left-over walnut and lime wood strips (about 0.02” thick), and glued them edge-to-edge.

 

post-130-0-20852900-1361574647_thumb.jpg

 

Once dry, I sliced down each colored side to a width of 1/32”, for a total strip width of 1/16” for the larger points of the star -- and then a little thinner for the smaller points.  Because they were so small, I cut them to shape, and then glued them to a paper backing to aid in alignment, as well as strengthening.  Once the glue was dry, I trimmed around the edges.

 

post-130-0-02738000-1361574652_thumb.jpg

 

post-130-0-19292300-1361574659_thumb.jpg

 

I used another cherry disc for the cap, and marked it up to align the star.

 

post-130-0-36492400-1361574666_thumb.jpg

 

post-130-0-09744600-1361574682_thumb.jpg

 

Then I used a micro chisel blade to carve out the area, and I inlaid the star.

 

post-130-0-43845300-1361574690_thumb.jpg

 

post-130-0-89143600-1361574696_thumb.jpg

 

Next up will be final assembly, and some tung oil -- to hopefully make the color contrasts in that star "pop".

Edited by j21896

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Haha! You know what? Your scratched capstan looks much better than the supplied one!

Good to see work done without a mill also..often you think you need a mill to get things right. You have proven otherwise ;)

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Capstan – completed
 

I had drilled a hole all the way through the center of the spindle, so that I could match-up and center the drumhead on the body, and the cap on the drumhead.  I also drilled a hole in the capstan deck platform, so that placement on the platform could be centered using a short piece of dowel as a locator pin.  I used 100% tung oil for the finish.

 

post-130-0-17819100-1361624837_thumb.jpg

 

A tale of two capstans:  Scratch-built vs. Kit

 

post-130-0-80611800-1361624842_thumb.jpg

 

post-130-0-77944700-1361624847_thumb.jpg

 

And finally, a few views of it in place on deck.

 

post-130-0-16674800-1361624854_thumb.jpg

 

post-130-0-05266100-1361624865_thumb.jpg

 

post-130-0-65716900-1361624871_thumb.jpg

 

post-130-0-72269600-1361624858_thumb.jpg

Edited by j21896

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Robert, Stunning piece of work, the inlay (veneering) and the capstan. 'specially the size you're working on.

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Robert,

 

That scratch capstan looks fantastic, far better than the kit supplied one.  Very very nice work on that inlay, too.  Very very nice small scale work.

 

Cheers,

 

Elia

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I sense that you're enjoying yourself to the extent that you made me smile.  I'm sure your next addition will look as well as the capstan.

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Robert, that capstan looks pretty sweet! I'm sensing that your dabbling with the dark arts of scratch building may lead you to the 'other half' of this website. Just adding the star to the top would have been cool but you went made it impressive when you inlaid it there. It's a very cool addition and I am very much looking forward to more updates.

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Thanks very much you guys!

 

Elia -- I'm realizing that my eyesight certainly ain't getting any better :)  For the inlay work, I could have used more magnification than my store-bought, reading glasses provide.  I tried to augment their magnification by also looking through the magnifying lense of my fluorescent desk lamp, but the clearance needed between the lamp lense and the chisel blade handle wouldn't allow me to get close enough to the piece to bring it into focus.  Could be time for an eyewear upgrade.

 

Augie -- This ship model thing sure is a lot of fun, huh?  Having this MSW community and the resources on the site, make it even more enjoyable!  I know you folks had a cool sub-group of Syren builders, but I'm glad you're in the main forum so the rest of us are more apt to discover your work!  (Now give us some more updates to your rigging :D  )

 

Patrick -- I can't deny my "itch to scratch" ;) but I'm not going anywhere until I actually see Mars through to completion!  That said, I did happen to take delivery of a Byrnes thickness sander and table saw this past week, so ...

 

Cheers,

Robert

Edited by j21896

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Working on it!  The blizzard hitting us today insures some quality workshop time :D  :D

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Hi Robert,

 

Excellent work on the capstan my friend, thanks for sharing your technique on making those whelps uniform in shape, it'll come in handy as I wish to try making one for my ship :) That nautical star really looks a treat, it'll really spruce up your capstan very nicely B)

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I like the innovations you have made to your build Robert, very nice work.

 

Well done.

 

B.E.

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Capping Rail

 

A very brief update:  after a few weeks of indecisiveness coupled with a small case of “builder’s block”, I finally began to fabricate the capping rail.

 

I taped in a short piece of dowel as a placeholder for the bowsprit, and after scrolling out the approximate shapes of the rail sections from cherry sheet , I've started test fitting and sanding them to about 90% of their final shape and dimensions.  With them temporarily taped in place, I can work on fit between the sections.

 

 

post-130-0-06049400-1363119282.jpg

 

 

Using hooked scarphs for the joinery.

 

 

post-130-0-33507300-1363119286.jpg

 

 

post-130-0-62970800-1363119290.jpg

 

 

post-130-0-73611500-1363119294.jpg

 

 

In addition to holding things in place with tape, I’ve drilled a few holes where some of the treenails will eventually go, and temporarily inserted short pieces of copper wire to ensure proper alignment, and consistent positioning after removal for shaping and replacement.

 

 

post-130-0-40242800-1363119300.jpg

 

 

The deck furniture waits patiently in the foreground (atop some sections of old test planking) to be returned to their homes.

 

 

post-130-0-19208300-1363119305.jpg

 

 

Now back to cutting scarph joints!

 

Cheers,

Robert

Edited by j21896

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Hi Robert

You may feel it is slow going but you are setting a very, very high standard. A benchmark. Beautiful jointing.

 

We'll get impatient to see more progress but as good as it is we'll just have to learn to wait and enjoy it when it is posted!

 

Cheers

Alistair

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Robert,

 

That hooked scarf jointed rail looks great - well worth the time and effort put into it.

 

Cheers,

 

Elia

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The cap rail and it's scarf joints are very nicely done. I'm looking forward to seeing that deck furniture in place.

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Beautiful work, Robert.  I'm just joining the chorus of admirers.  Nicely done on the scarfs.

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Capping Rail – continued

 

All joints are cut and sections of the rail for the port and starboard sides are now scarphed together and taped & pinned temporarily in place.  I won’t sand them to their final shape and dimensions until they are all permanently installed.

 

However, before I can permanently install them, it’s decision time on the catheads:  under the rail as per the kit plans, or over the rail as per the NMM plans?  Plus, I have to fabricate them!

 

I think I’m kind of leaning toward under the rail – though that involves a bit of nerve racking “excavation” work, as I did not leave openings in the planking at their positions.

 

 

About 3/64" more will be taken off the width in final sanding and shaping.

 

(Here the tape hides the "hooks" in the hook scarphs, but they're all there :))

 

post-130-0-20270200-1363635821.jpg

 

Almost there...

 

post-130-0-43028500-1363635826_thumb.jpg

 

 

And finally, all sections port and starboard.

 

post-130-0-71025200-1363635831.jpg

Edited by j21896

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Very nice.  Will be looking for the final position on the catheads!!!

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I think I’m kind of leaning toward under the rail – though that involves a bit of nerve racking “excavation” work

 

I think you're making the right choice - but I fully recognize I'm not the one who will have to do it.   :) That capping rail really enhances what already was looking very nice. It must be good to know that you'll have a capping rail that actually fits vs the kit supplied version.

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Some very sharp work you've been at. looks real good! The catheads ... hmmm that sounds familiar. I had to move them, that turned out alright. I used small drill bits (1 mm) to 'cut out' the opening for the catheads, and filed them to size. Though I must admit it is almost a sin to start that on such a lovely hull ...

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Great close-up shots of your deck planking Jason, love your work on the hooded planks and scarphs.

 

Cheers,

 

B.E.

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Robert, the capping rails look good. Carl is right about making any holes in the hull.... 

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